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How badly have I messed up? (Bought new boots, think a size too small)

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I recently bought my third ever pair of ski boots online.

 

I had previously owned a set of Salomon in a 30 (or possibly 30.5?) - and had then moved to Lange Comp RS 120's in a 31-point size.

 

In these I had volume reducers, two wedges to raise my heel, as well as a custom footbed and some foam wrapped around the outside of the liner with a gap for the anklebone.

 

The Langes were quite heavy and for some time now I've been looking for a lighter boot.   The Full-tilt boots were very attractive to me and a boot fitter in Whistler tried to persuade me to buy a 29.5 Fullt-Tilt boot last year, they did not have a 30 or 31 size Full tilt boot anywhere in the village!

 

At the time I tried them on and gave up as they seemed far too small.

 

Since then a number of bootfitters and friends 'wisdom' persuaded me that my existing size 31 boots were too big for me and that I should go down to a 29 or 29.5

 

as a result of all this my wife bought a pair of 29.5 Full Tilts online and had them shipped internationally to us in Europe.  Returning them is not an option so I will either use them or give them away.

 

I've tried on the boots and I can physically close them and fit my foot in (Just) but it is really painful and I cannot see how this could possibly make any sense.

 

I guess my FIRST question is - should my feet be absolutely crushed into the boot, is that REALLY the sign of a proper fit, because it doesn't seem that way.

 

and My SECOND question is - is there any way to make the boots slightly 'bigger' - i.e. specifically provide an extra few mm at the point of the big toe, without affecting how the boot fits into the binding?

 

Sorry for the newbie p[oints, but while I can sort-of diagnose problems I'm not sure what to do with a boot that seems "just too small" to me.

 

Thanks in advance for any guidance

 

(probably worth mentioning that as a resident of Ireland I am not exactly surrounded by expert bootfitters nor do I get the opportunity to spend a lot of time working on boot fit in resort during our all-too-brief ski trips)


Edited by catharsis - 1/5/14 at 4:58pm
post #2 of 9

full tilts are all made with intuition heat moldable liners. you need to get into a ski shop that can heat and custom mold the liners for you.

 

if the 29 shell is the correct shell for your foot, and assuming that your foot sits somewhere in the size dimensions of the full tilt model that you now own, doing a proper heat molding, including using toe caps, and pre padding any of the obvious bony spots on your feet that could cause pain, you have a high probability of getting a comfortable boot after the heat molding is correctly completed.

 

good luck with that.

 

jim

post #3 of 9

​possibly worth having a chat with Des at Climate ski in Belfast

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
 

Full Tilt can be challenging for high instep or wide feet .  Can you describe a little better your size, or how these boots are crushing your foot?  A thinner liner might do it, or some pro help.  One-size too small is not so bad as one-size too big.  There are some solutions out there.

I believe I have a relatively low volume flattish foot.... according to bootfitters.   

 

The crushing sensation is very simply at the big toe.   It is just barely acceptably painful when the knee is bent etc, but very much feels as if the toe is being painfully squeezes when the leg straightens.

right foot more painful than left even when at rest.  Right foot also experience some slight pins and needles sensation (presumably restricted circulation) and pain under the outside of the foot behind the pinkie - but note that my custome footbeds are not surrently in the FT's as they fo not fit.

 

Note also that all of the above experiences are at room temperature and NOT while skiing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by starthaus View Post
 

full tilts are all made with intuition heat moldable liners. you need to get into a ski shop that can heat and custom mold the liners for you.

 

if the 29 shell is the correct shell for your foot, and assuming that your foot sits somewhere in the size dimensions of the full tilt model that you now own, doing a proper heat molding, including using toe caps, and pre padding any of the obvious bony spots on your feet that could cause pain, you have a high probability of getting a comfortable boot after the heat molding is correctly completed.

 

good luck with that.

 

jim

 

I think that is my primary worry - what is the scenario if the 29 is NOT the correct shell - can a bootfitter help or is it back to the drawing board.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CEM View Post
 

​possibly worth having a chat with Des at Climate ski in Belfast

 

I'm based in Dublin, but I've always thought it's difficult to get a boot fit right without access to a slope to test.   There is a Snow and Rock branch in Dublin I could visit.

 

My current plan is to bring both the Langes and the new FT boots on my upcoming trip to Jackson Hole in March and spend some time in JH with a good bootfitter (Recommendations would be welcomed) getting the FT boots to a point where they fit more comfortably.

 

I'm also going to be in Davos for a couple of days in case anyone could recommend a bootfitter in Davos, Switzerland.

 

Historically I got the Langes worked on little by little over a couple of trips by Snell Sports in Chamonix, so I am aware of and happy to pay fo the services of a good bottfitter, my main aim with this thread is to determine whether a bootfitter can resolve a situation where I suspect the shell for my left foot is just about perfect but the shell itself seems slightly too short for my right big toe resulting in the painful crushing sensation

 

Thanks

 

C

post #5 of 9

what is the shell fit like on the FT that you have?

 

and if you have no return options, why not get them heat molded (with extra padding on the big toe, thick toe caps, and thick socks) and see if that is better after.  When trying on after use a VERY thin socks too.    what is the down side?

the pressure is on just the big toe?  and in length, width or height?    and this pressure is less (or gone) when you have the boot buckled and you are flex forward?

I bet the boots will be fine.

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

Shell fit is what concerns me

 

the left foot is so close to being bearable that I am basically unconcerned.  They are very tight and there is a little pressure on/against the front of the big toe but I expect to be able to work that out as the liner packs down or with tiny adjustments to the shell.

 

The right foot is more problematic and I would think there is probably only 2-3mm at the rear of my right foot in the shell without liner.

 

In response to your direct question above, the pain is unbearable when NOT buckled in and when NOT flexed fully so that the toe pressure against the front of the boot is lessened, but the issue I am worried about is that the pain/pressure is still substantial when flexed and so on....

 

 It is even possible for me to be touching the front and back of the empty shell at the same time with my right heel and right big toe if I stretch out fully, as it were.

 

The problem is related solely to length as far as I can see, the boots are not too narrow and seem to otherwise fit okay (in a gross sense) albeit with the fine tuning expected of any new pair of ski boots.

 

 

I know about heat molding the liners, and I have had Snell in Chamonix "blow out" or "punch" (sorry for not knowing the correct terminology) sore points in boots (e.g. above the anklebone).before, but I wan't aware of heat molding the shell, or is that the same thing?

 

What I guess I am really trying to find out is whether it is possible to make my right boot LONGER by blowing it out at the toe slightly or whether that will cause the boot not to fit into the binding.


Edited by catharsis - 1/6/14 at 8:18am
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by catharsis View Post
 

Shell fit is what concerns me

 

the left foot is so close to being bearable that I am basically unconcerned.  They are very tight and there is a little pressure on/against the front of the big toe but I expect to be able to work that out as the liner packs down or with tiny adjustments to the shell.

 

The right foot is more problematic and I would think there is probably only 2-3mm at the rear of my right foot in the shell without liner.

 

In response to your direct question above, the pain is unbearable when NOT buckled in and when NOT flexed fully so that the toe pressure against the front of the boot is lessened, but the issue I am worried about is that the pain/pressure is still substantial when flexed and so on....

 

 It is even possible for me to be touching the front and back of the empty shell at the same time with my right heel and right big toe if I stretch out fully, as it were.

 

The problem is related solely to length as far as I can see, the boots are not too narrow and seem to otherwise fit okay (in a gross sense) albeit with the fine tuning expected of any new pair of ski boots.

 

 

I know about heat molding the liners, and I have had Snell in Chamonix "blow out" or "punch" (sorry for not knowing the correct terminology) sore points in boots (e.g. above the anklebone).before, but I wan't aware of heat molding the shell, or is that the same thing?

 

What I guess I am really trying to find out is whether it is possible to make my right boot LONGER by blowing it out at the toe slightly or whether that will cause the boot not to fit into the binding.

yes it is possible to change the shape of most boots in the toe box.

 

order of what to do: 

 

get into a ski shop that has a boot fitter and the tools that go with being a boot fitter

 

get your footbed or a working footbed in the boot that will help to keep your foot stable and shorter

 

heat mold the liner

 

then see if shell work will be necessary

 

jim

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by starthaus View Post

yes it is possible to change the shape of most boots in the toe box.

 

order of what to do: 

 

get into a ski shop that has a boot fitter and the tools that go with being a boot fitter

 

get your footbed or a working footbed in the boot that will help to keep your foot stable and shorter

 

heat mold the liner

 

then see if shell work will be necessary

 

jim

 



Thanks for the encouraging answer of 'yes' ! My issue was the concern that the shell modification might not be possible in the toe box without affecting the fit into the binding.

I would regard the rest of that advice as a MINIMUM set of steps to be carried out by anyone buying a new set of ski boots!
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by catharsis View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by starthaus View Post
 

yes it is possible to change the shape of most boots in the toe box.

 

order of what to do: 

 

get into a ski shop that has a boot fitter and the tools that go with being a boot fitter

 

get your footbed or a working footbed in the boot that will help to keep your foot stable and shorter

 

heat mold the liner

 

then see if shell work will be necessary

 

jim

 



Thanks for the encouraging answer of 'yes' ! My issue was the concern that the shell modification might not be possible in the toe box without affecting the fit into the binding.

I would regard the rest of that advice as a MINIMUM set of steps to be carried out by anyone buying a new set of ski boots!

with the correct tools and skills a good bootfitter will be able to make that shell a great deal longer without affecting the fit into a binding, unfortunately there are many places selling boots that are not carrying out those MINIMUM steps 

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