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You Don't Wear a Helmet Yet? - Page 10

post #271 of 292
Cat in the helmet; they saved my wife's life. People will argue anything, it is not worth arguing with them over the obvious.
post #272 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomfifield View Post

Cat in the helmet; they saved my wife's life. People will argue anything, it is not worth arguing with them over the obvious.

 

Hey I like that one!

 

Good to hear about your wife, falling is never fun and I am grateful we live in a day and age where the development of safety gear is taken to this level. I do realize some people like to live with their head in the sand, but I figured I'd do my part by posting an actual picture with a story that might help someone somewhere make the right decision.

post #273 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by catinthehat85 View Post

..If you think helmets can't prevent/lessen head injury you're living in a dream world.

After reading your narrative I can think of a couple of other preventative measures that might have helped even more.
post #274 of 292
In all endeavors that are dangerous, some safety precautions are taken to mitigate risk. In the flying world, we have many levels of training and safety procedures to make sure we don't fly into the ground. We have instrument approaches that give a step by step instruction of how to fly the plane safely to the runway through a cloud. We could rely on those steps to prevent crashing but safety rules go several steps deeper than just saying, fly a good approach, don't screw up. We have special radar altimeters that let you know how high you are above the ground, special databases which take your GPS position and give you warning messages if it thinks you might fly into the ground. Autopilot helps relieve some workload for the pilots so they can put more attention into flying a stable approach and not crash. There are special lights on the approach ends of the runways that help guide the pilot in, the radar approach controllers help guide the airplanes in and avoid hitting each other. The maintenance of the airplanes is documented well and above what the most studious gear head would ever dream about for their car. Safety systems such as antilock brakes and stability control systems were developed for airplanes to help the pilots control the big machines in challenging crosswinds and wet/snowy/and icy runways.

All that just to help the pilot land on the runway. We could just say, "hey man, don't suck, just fly a good approach and land." But we don't, we have multiple levels of safety equipment and procedures in place so that if one of the safety features fails, there will be others to save the day or mitigate the potential damage when things go wrong.

My point is, in all the huge helmet thread discussions, can we all agree that it's not the only piece of safety equipment, it is only one of the levels of safety gear and procedures designed to help prevent or minimize injury on the slopes. After all, it can't hurt to wear it, so why try to convince people that it's not worth wearing?
post #275 of 292

My helmet saved me embarrassment at least, this week when the bar on the chair caught me hard.

post #276 of 292
@Songfta, that sounds like no fun at all. Hope you heal up soon.

Some story, catinthehat, and scary picture of your helmet. Sure, you might have avoided the collision entirely by making a different tactical move, but that's not the point. We use safety gear to protect us from our own mistakes, other people's mistakes, or unpredictable or unavoidable events. So when it comes down to brass tacks, all that matters is that you're okay, and I'd say certainly a lot more okay than you would have been without your brain bucket.

As for me, even though I was concussed when I did a header last spring (I suspect I'm vulnerable to them, having had several, including one severe one, when I was a kid), the helmet saved me from a broken nose and maybe a broken cheekbone, and I'm pretty sure my front teeth would have been knocked out without it. As it was I had a scraped nose and cheek, a cut on my eyebrow from my goggles, a fat lip, and some months of cognitive issues. Not as bad as it might have been.
post #277 of 292

I'd say you can avoid about 98% of crashes by being careful, skiing within your limits, and paying attention to what is going on around you.  That other 2% is why helmets are a good idea.    

 

I skied without one for the last 25 years, but I finally broke down and got one this year.  It wasn't a big deal.  They are pretty comfortable, and keep you warm as good as or better than a hat.  

 

One thing I will say against wearing a helmet is that there is a psychological effect in some people.  I remember back when I was in high school, and they made us wear helmets for GS races.  While we were free skiing before and after the races, there was no limit to the stupid things we would try because we had helmets on.

post #278 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by TreeFiter View Post
 

 

One thing I will say against wearing a helmet is that there is a psychological effect in some people.  I remember back when I was in high school, and they made us wear helmets for GS races.  While we were free skiing before and after the races, there was no limit to the stupid things we would try because we had helmets on.

 

I've never really bought into this theory, speaking for myself and my ski buddies when I was in high school. We didn't wear helmets for tech events in those days, and while we were free skiing before and after the races, there was no limit to the stupid things we would try because we were teenagers.

post #279 of 292
The fastest I ever went was without one.
Last Sunday on the radio there was a person talking about skier safety, one of the things he said was that there was one skull fracture with a helmet to forty skull fractures without a helmet. My wife hit a tree and cracked her helmet to bits; she was bruised but lived to tell about it and lived to tell about it. Yes you still need to smart.
post #280 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by CluelessGaper59 View Post
 

 

I've never really bought into this theory, speaking for myself and my ski buddies when I was in high school. We didn't wear helmets for tech events in those days, and while we were free skiing before and after the races, there was no limit to the stupid things we would try because we were teenagers.

I certainly don't think its a good reason not to wear a helmet.  We did stupid things without helmets too, but we went to new levels of stupidity when we put on helmets.  Everybody is different, but for some, it does create the illusion of invincibility.  

post #281 of 292
post #282 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

I refer you to #5...

 

http://flashbak.com/8-reasons-children-of-the-1970s-should-all-be-dead-323

 

Was I supposed to look at the kids without helmets...or their hot Mom, who was also sans helmet, BTW?

post #283 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

I refer you to #5...

 

http://flashbak.com/8-reasons-children-of-the-1970s-should-all-be-dead-323

 

 

This a really ambiguous article. The tile and the commentary on each image seem to be criticizing the lack of care and supervision. The lead in takes a different view and basically says we are all over reacting. The whole thing seems a little conflicted. Maybe I'm expecting too much from internet memes, but folks do post them like they're word.

 

With regards to #5, I'm really not sure if he is saying we should be wearing helmets, or because we survived childhood without them we are now over reacting.

 

"The way things are going, every kid is going to go to school wearing bubble wrap and a helmet.  Back in the 1970s (and earlier), parents didn’t stress about our health and safety as much as they do today.  It’s not that they cared less – they just didn’t worry compulsively about it.

Parents of 2014 need to be reminded of how less restricted, less supervised, less obsessively safety-conscious things were… and it was just fine."

post #284 of 292
Not every kid did survive that is one good reason for being a bit smarter and safer.
post #285 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

I refer you to #5...

 

http://flashbak.com/8-reasons-children-of-the-1970s-should-all-be-dead-323

 

 

This a really ambiguous article. The tile and the commentary on each image seem to be criticizing the lack of care and supervision. The lead in takes a different view and basically says we are all over reacting. The whole thing seems a little conflicted. Maybe I'm expecting too much from internet memes, but folks do post them like they're word.

 

With regards to #5, I'm really not sure if he is saying we should be wearing helmets, or because we survived childhood without them we are now over reacting.

 

"The way things are going, every kid is going to go to school wearing bubble wrap and a helmet.  Back in the 1970s (and earlier), parents didn’t stress about our health and safety as much as they do today.  It’s not that they cared less – they just didn’t worry compulsively about it.

Parents of 2014 need to be reminded of how less restricted, less supervised, less obsessively safety-conscious things were… and it was just fine."

 

 

The article seems ambiguous to you because the issue is ambiguous. On the one hand, we do worry too much these days. On the other hand there were a lot of preventable injuries back in the day--the best example being cars, which are a whole lot safer than they used to be. But rather than overanalyze it, just read it and laugh. 

 

I've often wondered why--if there is so much danger in the world--why are there 7 billion of us?

post #286 of 292
Easy. We are particularly skilled at procreating. It could be argued that all the dangers we face comprise the predators that keep our population in check.

Except we have overwhelmed the dangers to the point where overpopulation becomes a problem. Then a bunch of us starve and die off and balance is eventually restored.
post #287 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

 

The article seems ambiguous to you because the issue is ambiguous. 

 

Absolutely! Not only is the subject matter ambiguous, but the intent is as well.

post #288 of 292

I will never understand peoples compulsion to justify their own choices by trying to convince other to do the same...

 

Choose for yourself and let others do likewise (it pertains to more than helmets!)

post #289 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Not to mention the safety bars on the chairlifts.  If I were really tall I wouldn't get on the lift without a helmet ever..

This is where my helmet has been mostly used... The taller you are, the more you need to wear an helmet in the chairlift...:D

 

I had a couple of commotion in my life and the last one affected my working memory...it is really a pain in the ass! This year, I'm looking to change for the new Giro Discord: a soft shell helmet with memory foam inside... Watch out safety bars!!!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTDVfRmofkI

post #290 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skierish View Post
 

 

Was I supposed to look at the kids without helmets...or their hot Mom, who was also sans helmet, BTW?

 

DAMN those are some legs..

post #291 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogsie View Post
 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTDVfRmofkI

 

 

Great marketing blurp with non specific phrases like "rebound energy", "fatigue span". The main selling point seems to be that it can take multiple impacts without needing to be replaced. I wanted to be cynical about this at first, but there is no more or less research into it's medical effectiveness than regular helmets. Probably the most pertinent concept is that a good fitting helmet is the safest, warmest and most comfortable.

 

Maybe multiple layers of high tech energy foam are better than a destructible hard shell, but it feels like the the old leather football helmets. Not that the fancy new NFL ones seems to be preventing concussions.

 

Maybe going full circle and coming back to soft helmets is the way to go? Guess the "energy management holes" and "direction venting patterns" are not quite as revolutionary as they claim :)

 

 

post #292 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abox View Post

 

DAMN those are some legs..

 

On that at least I guess we can all agree.   ;)

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