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Am I too old to start racing - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Thread Starter 
Are there any at deer valley? As that's or next planned resort.
post #32 of 47

From Deer Valley Website you have a phone number and link to NASTAR registration online:

 

NASTAR

Deer Valley Resort offers the excitement of NASTAR ski racing at its race course on Bald Mountain near the Silver Lake Lodge. All races will be held daily from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the Dual GS venue (weather permitting). Exceptions to the schedule are noted here. NASTAR is the largest recreational ski race program in the world, developed by SKI Magazine in 1968, and is available at over 120 of the nation's premier resorts. This fun, competitive and easily accessible racing program allows racers of all ages and abilities a means to compare themselves with one another, regardless of when and where they race. This is accomplished by establishing the National Standard on each NASTAR course and through a racer handicap system. Each time you race NASTAR, you could win a Platinum, Gold, Silver or Bronze medal based on the handicap you earn. On Saturdays (schedule permitting), race against the daily time posted by Deer Valley’s NASTAR pacesetter, three-time Olympian, Heidi Voelker.

For more information and on-site race registration, contact the Race Course start facility at 435-645-6876 or pre-register online at nastar.com.

post #33 of 47
Thread Starter 
Ok thank you I will be going there tomorrow where I can try
post #34 of 47
Where was the video taken? No traffic whatsoever. What a great way to start a new year.

Three observations from your video. Many will probably agree that this is the holy trinity in ski racing, especially when they are beginning.

1. Knees to skis - Keep forward pressure by putting your shin against the tongue of your boot and by bending your ankles, knees, and hips like sitting down on a chair but forward motion.

2. Shins apart and parallel - ski on the pinky toe edge of the inside leg and big toe edge of your outside leg.

3. Steady top - keep your head and upper body steady and forward upright, and both arms forward at about 45 degree.
post #35 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

Where was the video taken? No traffic whatsoever. What a great way to start a new year.

Three observations from your video. Many will probably agree that this is the holy trinity in ski racing, especially when they are beginning.

1. Knees to skis - Keep forward pressure by putting your shin against the tongue of your boot and by bending your ankles, knees, and hips like sitting down on a chair but forward motion.

2. Shins apart and parallel - ski on the pinky toe edge of the inside leg and big toe edge of your outside leg.

3. Steady top - keep your head and upper body steady and forward upright, and both arms forward at about 45 degree.
Solitude. Not many people were there was able to hop right on the lifts.
Could you please expand on 2 and 3 please?
post #36 of 47
Sure. You can get a good visual on the form by watching these videos.

Look at the guys legs -
http://youtu.be/eWyhB47yAqc

GS stance and turns -
http://youtu.be/QIdVaBIX64o

Slalom stance and turns -
http://youtu.be/RSdMXsluGj4

If #2/3 aren't speaking to you, just remember #1--knees to skies at all times. That'll immediately make a noticeable difference in the way you ski and help develop certain muscles. Then remember and practice #3. Then #2. (I should've reversed the order of 2 and 3). Don't try to practice all at once. It's like learning how to play golf. Form and balance are paramount for skiing. Keep things simple and take one thing at a time in the beginning.

Practice on intermediate to low runs first to really get the form down and develop muscle strength and endurance. Buy a used pair of cheater GS skis in 180 cm and start practicing long slow GS turns first. Get yourself into a program ASAP. You'd like rigor and practice of basics rather than lots of information.
Edited by nochaser - 1/1/14 at 11:18pm
post #37 of 47
Thread Starter 
Alright a update. The coach of the team replied saying that tryouts ended and he can't do anything and to watch website for next year. So I'm wondering what my next move should be. It seems more racing programs and teams have already started
post #38 of 47

Have you tried Nastar yet?

post #39 of 47

Do Nastar.  If you're lucky and get to know the regulars, maybe eventually they'll give you some pointers. 

post #40 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Do Nastar.  If you're lucky and get to know the regulars, maybe eventually they'll give you some pointers. 
Alright thanks. Sadly I want able to do the nastar at deer valley due to the fact that I wasn't over 18 and had no parent to sign the waiver
post #41 of 47
But you can do it where you live, right?
post #42 of 47
Thread Starter 
Alpine doesn't have it and I don't think Wilmont has it but a little north there is a place that I know has it
post #43 of 47
If you're serious about this, you need to put in the time. That means every week if not daily. You're starting late by about five years at least.
post #44 of 47
Thread Starter 
I'm going to try and get out there as much as I can. It is not a short drive but I will try to get out every weekend
post #45 of 47

Chestnut Mountain IL seems to have an active program LINK

post #46 of 47

You're definitely not too old to start, but you will need race skis. If you try racing on, say, park skis, you'll have a very hard time. If you plan to ski both slalom and GS, get slalom skis. You can ski both slalom and GS on slalom skis, but you would have a very hard time skiing slalom on GS skis.

post #47 of 47

I have some fantastic GS skis with bindings in this thread.  They are 21meter FIS World Cup Fishers in 180cm.  Great for Nastar.  $25 discount for being a new racer.

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