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Ski upgrade.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hello all!

 

I was wondering if someone might be able to help me out with advice.  I'm looking to upgrade my skis.
 
I am currently a 47 year old, who has been skiing eight years.  East coast only.  Poconos (Elk, CBK, Blue Mt, BBJF) and Vermont (Okemo, Pico, Killington, Stratton).  That profile avatar of me was taken at the loft bar at Pico last year actually.
 
I'm 5'11", 200 lbs.
 
Ski mostly groomers, but do some off-piste tree skiing and ungroomed (like the Sundowner at Pico).   I also like to do side and tree cuts. Occasionally, as with all East coast skiing, I'm on ice (Forty-Niner at PICO anyone?)
 
I think I am considered advanced or advanced intermediate.  I ski about 10 times a year.
 
My CURRENT skis are 160mm, K2 FOUR R's.  I know that is short for my size, but I bought them after my 2nd year skiing and I wanted stability and ease of turning more than anything. Speed is not my #1 priority anymore and I've been happy with them. 
 
If possible I'd prefer to stay with K2.
 
Thank you!

 

John from South Jersey.


Edited by jflaherty - 12/29/13 at 12:50am
post #2 of 17

Welcome to EpicSki. I grew up skiing the Poconos. Loved Elk. 

 

160 is way too short for you, even if you're just skiing groomed blues. 

 

One thing to decide is whether you want a more dedicated carving ski or more of an all-mountain ski. There are so many good skis in these categories that it's hard to just pick one. K2 makes good skis, but no better than a half dozen other companies so don't wed yourself to that brand. That said, the Amp 80XTI may be just what you're looking for.

 

Check out these guides by SierraJim to get a good starting point:

http://starthaus.com/wordpress/2013/10/09/2014-frontside-carver-ski-comparison-sierra-jim/

 

http://starthaus.com/wordpress/2013/10/10/skinny-all-mountain-ski-review-82-to-90-mm-sierra-jim/

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hi kauffee. Thanks for your reply!

 

I love Elk. My favorite Poconos, I just hate the slow-lifts.

 

I knew the 160' would draw comments.  :-)

 

I've received a bit of push-back from some, but most people I talk to, including the salesmen at three different locations, did not push the idea of lengthening them.  As I sad, I was looking for stability and turning ability.  My understanding is that longer basically means faster but also less stable and turns harder.  What length would you recommend?

 

I will look at the Amp 80XTI and the links you sent.

 

Thank you!

 

John from South Jersey.

post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 

Yikes!  $800!

 

Hmmm.

 

That was a tad outside my range.

post #5 of 17
Less stable??? Maybe if they're soft? I'm a K2 fan, have the Recon and the Outlaw. I think the Rictor is the new Recon. No shorter than the 177 IMO. I am not a gear expert, but spent 25 years skiing the Poconos. I think if you stuck to only groomers, you'd want longer, but since it is a stiffish ski, the shorter length might be better. K2 doesn't get a lot of love here, but it's forgiving of technique flaws, which for me at least are heavily ingrained.

To save money, wait to buy until later in the season or buy last year's model.
post #6 of 17

A shorter ski may be easier to turn, however it is LESS stable than a longer ski. At your height and weight, you need a longer ski for more stability when you're at speed. You'll be far more comfortable on a longer ski because of that added stability and you won't lose the ability to turn the ski easily... it will just carve much better. If you don't believe me, demo a ski somewhere around the mid 170s and you'll see. 

 

What's your budget for skis and bindings? (Most of the dedicated carving skis will have system bindings included.)

post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 

"K2 doesn't get a lot of love here, but it's forgiving of technique flaws, which for me at least are heavily ingrained."

 

  • sibhusky:  
  •  
  • You just descibed me to a T.  I've never had a lesson.  I'm certain I am LOADED with technique flaws and forgiving is what I want.  :-)

 

 

post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
  •  

Kaufkee:  Thank you again for your insight.  Perhaps you are correct on length.

 

What I mean is, I'm sure you know what you're talking about...

 

Budget?  I don't know.  I guess I was hoping to come in under $600? Those AMP 80XTI do sound promising to me however.  I guess I'm not going to get away with $399.  :-)

post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jflaherty View Post
 

Hello all!

 

I was wondering if someone might be able to help me out with advice.  I'm looking to upgrade my skis.
 
I am currently a 47 year old, who has been skiing eight years.  East coast only.  Poconos (Elk, CBK, Blue Mt, BBJF) and Vermont (Okemo, Pico, Killington, Stratton).  That profile avatar of me was taken at the loft bar at Pico last year actually.
 
I'm 5'11", 200 lbs.
 
Ski mostly groomers, but do some off-piste tree skiing and ungroomed (like the Sundowner at Pico).   I also like to do side and tree cuts. Occasionally, as with all East coast skiing, I'm on ice (Forty-Niner at PICO anyone?)
 
I think I am considered advanced or advanced intermediate.  I ski about 10 times a year.
 
My CURRENT skis are 160mm, K2 FOUR R's.  I know that is short for my size, but I bought them after my 2nd year skiing and I wanted stability and ease of turning more than anything. Speed is not my #1 priority anymore and I've been happy with them. 
 
If possible I'd prefer to stay with K2.
 
Thank you!

 

John from South Jersey.

Check out the K2 Richtor 90 Xti. 

I think Philpug did a review on it recently. 

 

I'll tag it on the side of this page. 

post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 

Much obliged Trekchick.

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 

K2 Richtor 90 Xti. might be too much ski for me from what I am reading.  Also looks more like a powder ski, and I don't see a lot of that.

post #12 of 17

Not to push you into a purchase, but I believe Start Haus has them in stock.  You can contact @Start Haus or @Philpug if you decide this is something you want to buy.  They treat EpicSki Bears pretty well.  But then.....I'm a little bias:D 

 

Edit:  Looks like we posted at the same time. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jflaherty View Post
 

K2 Richtor 90 Xti. might be too much ski for me from what I am reading.  Also looks more like a powder ski, and I don't see a lot of that.

Its not really a powder ski, more of an all mountain ski that is also happy to go off piste if you're inspired.  We've had mostly groomer days here in Tahoe this season.  The Richtor 90 has been great for that kind of terrain. 

post #13 of 17

Watch for a "demo" day at one of your ski-resorts or one you would like to go to.  Okemo just had one back on the 14th.    I went to that one.  It is a great way to check out skis.   It really helped me feel the difference between a "forgiving" ski (my skiing needs a LOT of forgiveness) and a performance ski that feels really good when I am doing the right things but gets squirrely in a big hurry when I got a little in the back seat.   You can also check out different lengths and widths.  

 

As some others have said, don't start out with your mind set on a brand.  Ski some different skis and see how they feel for you.  If you can afford it and can't find a demo day you can always hit the demo shack at the slopes and rent what you want to try.  Talk to people on lifts and ask them about their skis (people who aren't renting).  Once you've found something you like you can start poking around the interwebs and find a demo/used pair for considerably less that retail.  I've got a pair of demos enroute to me for 1/2 retail.  If I would have moved quicker on another opportunity I could have save $50 over that.

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thank you Knucklehead.

 

I'm going to Demo  set of K2 AMP 80x's (but not 80t) next weekend.  I'll let ya'll know how it went.

 

Knucklehead, any particular site you like to use for purchasing used/demo skis?

 

John 

post #15 of 17

I live in Utah and have the luxury of skiing enough to own a quiver of different skis for different conditions.  Between the dry winters we've had recently and my involvement with the local USSA alpine races, I've rediscovered the fun of carving groomers.  I'm skiing on the discontinued Rossignol 80Ti in a 170cm length (I'm 5'8" and 160lbs) and the ski is phenomenal - very solid and aggressive.  Many local ski instructors ski on that ski, as well as its replacement, the Rossi Avenger 82 Ti.  Both skis come with integrated bindings and can be found online used at good prices.  Definitely a great frontside charging ski, but not for off piste...too stiff, too narrow.  Just my two cents -- good luck selecting a ski to meet your needs.

post #16 of 17

This is the first pair I've bought using the web (in this case eBay).  But other than my first skis the other three pairs I've purchased have been used and I haven't had any issues.  My next two paris were through friends of my ski nut daughter.   They are both still in service.    

 

Most interweb used-ski highways lead to eBay or places near there as far as I can tell.  I googled the skis I was interested in with "demo" and "used" following the model.  Liquidationsports.com and levelninesports.com seem to have a decent selection, but I found mine directly on eBay from a user "demo_skis".  Liquidation is an "eBay Store", I think, whatever that is.  I was going to purchase from them but the ones I wanted were mislabeled.  They were upfront about it and offered other sizes for the same price but I wanted what I wanted so went back to searching.  My daughter likes Levelnine but they didn't have what I was looking for at a demo price.

 

Probably too early in the season now, but towards the end of the ski season it might be worthwhile to ask the demo tent or shack what they want to let you take the skis with you rather than dry and wax them again.  

 

Another thing to consider, if you can wait, is to attend a ski show.  In the east they have one in, IIRC, November or thereabouts at the Meadowlands Sports complex.  I got my boots once when I happened to be in Denver while there was a ski sale at the Denver convention center.  I got boots (and socks and such) for as low a price as I could find anywhere, including the net.  To me the advantage of finding the best possible price (within reason) is that it allows me to go for something a little better than I would have gone for at retail.  It isn't that I spend less $$ overall, just that now, for example, I have better boots than I would otherwise own.  And it leaves you a few $ to go get them fitted.

 

Also, if you got to the larger ski areas (Summit County, CO being an example - Frisco, Breckenridge, Dillon, Silverthorne, etc) most sports shops (and there are MANY) will have a consignment section.   I know people who stock their quiver that way - add a pair of fatties for powder days, well worn but OK and cheap for early and late season rocks, etc.  For the price of one rental they wind up with a pair of skis they use for certain conditions - or sell to friends and acquaintances who get the bug.  The yutes are forever trading and buying and selling bits and pieces of equipment to one another.  They're like pushers ;)

 

I love skiing but not that much ;)

post #17 of 17

jflaherty -- here's another option that might be perfect for you...the Atomic Blackeye.  It includes a tip rocker for more versatility, too.  No, I don't rep any of these skis I've written about or Level Nine Sports.  Again, good luck.

 

$499 with bindings at Level Nine Sports -- http://www.levelninesports.com/Atomic-2014-Blackeye-Skis-Wxto-12-Bindings

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