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Anyone have feet that point outwards? Tiring. - Page 2

post #31 of 58

You fools need to learn to keep your noggin up over your shoulders instead of forward or off to the side messing with your gear or whatever when the bar is coming down.  If you are sitting on the lift properly the bar won't hit your head unless you are over 6'5" tall or something..  If you're leaning forward messin' with your boots or off to the side digging for your stupid phone or something like that you'll get cracked when the bar is coming down.

post #32 of 58
How bout just say....bar down
post #33 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Robertson View Post

How bout just say....bar down

Won't work.  I'll have my headphones blaring.

post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

I have this problem every time my feet leave the snow.  Will any of the advice above help my issue of it happening even when not sitting on the chair?
 

 

Boot alignment will probably help with the splaying ski issue as many have posted. But I would definite consider canting for your ski pole grips to eliminate the hand issue.

post #35 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Robertson View Post

How bout just say....bar down


I always do but..  it isn't and shouldn't be mandatory for people to say anything at all.

 

Need me to tell you when to sit down too as the chair comes around the bullwheel like I did with my 6 year old? 

 

There are some things about the sport of skiing everyone should have learned before being allowed to ski solo.  Keeping your head over your shoulders as the lift is leaving the ground to keep the bar from hitting it is a pretty important basic skill.  If you haven't learned that after being hit more than once Darwin needs to do his job.  Bar down is mandatory at some resorts and it is mandatory for anyone riding with a resort employee like a patrol or instructor.  Watch your head!

 

I don't bitch at the liftie if the chair slams my calf because they didn't hold it "just right" for me.  I pay attention and sit at the right moment or reach back and grab the chair myself if I don't like where they are or aren't holding it.  Same goes for safety bars coming down.  I anticipate others pulling it down unannounced if I haven't started to grab it already.


Edited by crgildart - 12/29/13 at 12:45pm
post #36 of 58
If you're having issues on the flat or on a tow lift, and taking a lot of energy just to go straight getting pulled, then yea you have a stance/align issue. Perhaps lay off the crossfit for a bit and get to the yoga/pilates studio.

Then to the bootfitters
post #37 of 58

No doubt about it - those duck feet really suck for skiing but I'll bet that would be the perfect set up for a snowboard. Just turn sideways

post #38 of 58
Well, if you ski with Sib, she will actively make sure she gets everyone's parts out of the way when she pulls it down. There's no need for this rapid yanking stuff. Consideration!!
post #39 of 58

Get someone to video of you skiing and post it,and some of us could tell you what you are doing.

Do try and see how you stance is (do as I said before), if your stance is pronated or off camber it will have a big effect on your ability to control your skis.One thing I do when helping people learn to be better skiers is to see how their skis set on the snow when just standing; feet should be the same distance apart as if you were standing in you street shoes when you do your checking.

post #40 of 58

I always get everyone's attention before bringing the bar down, if you have you music blasting in your head phones I make jesters and make sure you know, I have not hit anyones head yet. 

post #41 of 58
Thread Starter 
Today I made some more observations and have confirmed that it just has to be an alignment issue.

On the lift, even with my thighs together and parallel, my feet splay out quite a bit, way more than anyone else on the lift. I feel almost self-conscious because my skis are always hitting other peoples' crap. And this is first few runs of the day too, so it's not fatigue. When I try to emulate the spread that other people have I simply can't hold it for very long before feeling thigh burn, not to mention it actually feels out of alignment to me. It feels like I'm turning my feet and thighs inwards much more than normal, even though visually it's exactly the same as everyone else.

I remember riding a bicycle and having pedal clips. They had my feet at a parallel stance and I remember getting incredible thigh fatigue as a result and wondering why. As soon as I started riding with my feet on the pedals in a splayed position the fatigue disappeared and I could ride for longer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

If you're having issues on the flat or on a tow lift, and taking a lot of energy just to go straight getting pulled, then yea you have a stance/align issue. Perhaps lay off the crossfit for a bit and get to the yoga/pilates studio.

Then to the bootfitters

Ahhh... I hadn't though about that. I hate tows. Those have always kind of tired me out because I'm forced to keep my feet parallel. I have to keep my thighs flexed the entire time (having my knees touch and putting pressure on each other helps me hold the parallel stance).

*sigh*

I've been to two different boot fitters now and have thrown $1500 on boots just to make them wide enough. I guess I'm looking at yet another boot that'll be like $1000.
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

I have this problem every time my feet leave the snow.  Will any of the advice above help my issue of it happening even when not sitting on the chair?
 

 

Boot alignment will probably help with the splaying ski issue as many have posted. But I would definite consider canting for your ski pole grips to eliminate the hand issue.


I have that exact issue on jumps. My feet go opposite directions and it makes the jump just incredibly wild. I've even landed (crashed) like that many many times as well.

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post #42 of 58

Perhaps you should try skiing switch more?:duck:

post #43 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzybabybunny View Post
 

 

I had the same problem while doing CrossFit. My instructor said that my feet need to point parallel while doing a deadlift. Well, I could hardly even do it. My feet are just naturally splayed outwards, a lot. The other people had zero problem doing it. In fact, parallel seemed to be their natural alignment.

 

Stop faffing about with CrossFit and find a trainer who knows something about adductor/abductor imbalances and how to correct them. 

The bad news is that you might have to do an entire spring and summer and fall of soccer drills or yoga exercises or skating drills or something analogous.   The good news is that any fixes you make to your ski gear now will be obsolete by next winter. 

post #44 of 58

My legs are splayed like that on the lift, and it's also quite uncomfortable for me to try to keep the skis parallel so they don't hit other, but everyone has alignment issues or other physical problems and that's why we go to bootfitters, take ski lessons, etc. In Pilates my instructor focuses quite a bit on proper alignment, which none of us in class have naturally; there are definitely exercises that you can do to help yourself in this regard. And don't get too hung up on it--think about blind skiers or skiers with other serious physical limitations that still manage to ski well.

post #45 of 58
Thread Starter 
I'm thinking that alignment issues are a result of natural bone structure, no? My bones and feet have always been like this. I don't know if things like yoga or
pilates would change the bone structure... I just have to get gear that's more tailored to me and compensate in ways that other people don't have to.

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post #46 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzybabybunny View Post

I'm thinking that alignment issues are a result of natural bone structure, no? My bones and feet have always been like this. I don't know if things like yoga or
pilates would change the bone structure... I just have to get gear that's more tailored to me and compensate in ways that other people don't have to.

Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk

 

That's sort of a lazy answer.  You can go to some classes and at least maximize/optimize what your body can do;

Or you can take the easy way out and just go with that explanation.

It's like saying, I'll just eat a bunch of junk food and get lipo or stomach stapling later, my body just naturally has a slow metabolism.

 

EDIT:
Not trying to tell you what to do, so you can take the advice or leave it, won't bother me, I can ski straight without any effort :).  But obviously you have a problem enough to cause you to post; and aren't having as much fun skiing as you could have. If I were in your shoes I would at least get in touch with a pilates/yoga instructor and check it out, rather then just giving up and saying forget it, I'm doomed to ski tired.

post #47 of 58
It sounds like you may have an extreme problem, and it sounds as if you did all you could with your boots; I am sorry man, must be a bummer. One person said try snowbaording.
post #48 of 58

It's one thing to have feet that splay out on a chair lift--most of us do, and another to sit on the chair with one's knees as far apart as possible. Can't people confine these little territorial games to airplane seats? (Not talking about the OP here.) 

post #49 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

It's one thing to have feet that splay out on a chair lift--most of us do, and another to sit on the chair with one's knees as far apart as possible. Can't people confine these little territorial games to airplane seats? (Not talking about the OP here.) 

Most people are cool about this, but not all, i have noticed snowboarder have for the most part learned to control their boards on the chair so as not to keep banging into or setting them on your skis.
post #50 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomfifield View Post

It sounds like you may have an extreme problem, and it sounds as if you did all you could with your boots; I am sorry man, must be a bummer. One person said try snowbaording.

Ehhh... I ski well enough that I don't need or want to switch. I'm lucky that it's not debilitating - I'm just not going to be doing any endurance skiing anytime soon and I'll just have to rest a bit more than other people. It's good to know I have this problem though so that now I can be extra mindful of what I need to do to compensate. Like for jumps I need to make it a habit to always always always make a conscious effort to suck my legs together and point my feet inwards (well, inwards to me) so that they're parallel. I can't just relax my legs and feet and let them go wherever.

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post #51 of 58

fuzzy, I think you got this thread off on the wrong foot (ugh,sorry) by showing the lift picture. But clearly you're taking this seriously so I'll try to help.

 

I have similar abducted feet (not just on the lift... but looking at my footprints in sand, for example) and there may be some relation to thigh fatigue, but my feeling now is that it's a lot more complicated than just getting thigh burn from having to square your foot. Many people that have abducted feet have limited dorsiflexion in their ankle. The abducted foot requires less dorsiflexion when taking a step than if your foot was straight. 

 

When I got back into skiing heavily a few years ago, I had similar issues with thigh burn. They've been mostly solved with boots and technique. You may be pressing on the front of your boots, but if there's too much forward lean or ramp angle, than you may be compensating by squatting and pulling your butt back. So you may not think you're in the back seat even though, functionally, you are.

 

What you really need is a very good boot fitter to evaluate your stance, range of motion, balance, etc and make sure you're in the right boot. Even then, the two of you may have to experiment with canting, ramp angles, etc. 

 

You didn't say anything about where you live, where you ski, your height/weight, skier ability, current equipment, etc. That would all help.

 

P.S. - I switched to a Fischer SOMA boot this season. I didn't notice a bit of difference with the SOMA stance. As has been pointed out in numerous other threads, almost all boot manufacturers have foot abduction built into the boot. In some it's centered on the center of the foot, and in others it's centered on the heel. Fischer just seems to advertise it more. 

post #52 of 58

As another proud member of the duckfooted clan (Not just toes out, but EEE with skinny ankles) I have trained myself to stay parallel. For me harder issue was that my toes turning out made my knees track inside my big toes when flexing forward, resulting in a persistent A frame. The first time I skied in Fischer SOMA boots my A frame went away. My feet still splay out farther on the lifts then many people, But the Fischer boots are definitely something to check out. 

post #53 of 58

post #54 of 58

My god. Me, my wife, and everybody else riding this chairlift has this problem.

 

 

AND THIS CHAIR

MOTHER OF GOD.

 

I have taken to the habit of setting the go-pro to take a picture every 30 seconds on non-powder days, and when I forget to turn it off, I get 15 pictures of this. :)

 

OP- it is pretty natural for the legs to open up while relaxed. In reviewing pictures like the above in 5 days of skiing, I only found 1 skier we shared a lift with that kept their skis straight, and I suspect they did so because they didn't want to hit another's skis. In the last picture my wife is using the foot bar.

 

IIRC, you are new to the sport and made a pretty immortal threads about powder being terrible.  Most intermediate skiers ski backseat and blow up their quads. 

 

I get that you ski a lot and have probably advanced a lot since that thread, but if I had to guess between you being too duck footed to ski, or being backseat enough to wear out your quads, I would guess the latter. An instructor could give you some feedback on that front, or other pieces of your technique that could be causing muscle fatigue.  I think your money would be better spent ruling out that type of an issue before taking expensive steps on the equipment front.


Edited by anachronism - 1/3/14 at 5:02pm
post #55 of 58

I'm always reminded of "It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World" when there are two or more on a lift...

 

post #56 of 58

I have a ton of natural turnout (way more than shown in the first photo).  This worked well for me as a professional dancer in my early 20s, but took some getting used to with skiing, especially with not hitting other people's skis on the lift.  The thigh pain you're experiencing is unrelated.

 

It hurts like hell for me to try to ski in a wedge, though.  Lift-line speeds are okay, but anything more than that, and my knees get unhappy in a hurry.

post #57 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Well, if you ski with Sib, she will actively make sure she gets everyone's parts out of the way when she pulls it down. There's no need for this rapid yanking stuff. Consideration!!

 

This. If you slammed a door on somebody, it is your fault. It doesn't really matter what they are doing, it is your fault for not checking that the door was clear before closing somebody in it.

 

Come on already. There is no excuse for hitting somebody in the head. It is your fault for yanking it down on them while being too damned lazy to check to see if it was clear.

 

I don't give a damn about wanting to put the bar down, just don't donk me in the head with it.

 

Also, calling "Bar Down" or some variant AND THEN HITTING ME IN THE HEAD WITH THE BAR BEFORE I CAN GET MY HEAD CLEAR also doesn't clear you. It is still your damned fault.

 

This is simple stuff here folks. You generally avoid injuring others in other daily activities, you can do it here.

post #58 of 58

When your feet are haning down from the lift the toes will point out, for all normal people, and when the feet are weighted not so much.

 

You may have an alignment issue, or you may not, but you have to see how your feet line up when they are weighted, not when they are hanging.

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