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Which ski goggles to choose?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Hi.

I'm about to buy me a pair of new goggles. I can't say I know a lot about different glasses, and I have never switched between glasses ever before. I just want the a pair of goggles with the best lens.

I'm a Norwegian skier and only goes skiing in Norway. Our weather is mostly cloudy. For reference, I'm a telemark freeride skier.

I've been looking at Oakley splice, crowbar and airbrake.
Do you guys have some recommendations?


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post #2 of 22

Welcome to EpicSki.

If you wear a helmet skiing be sure whatever your buy is compatible i.e. fits well with the helmet.

post #3 of 22

Can't say which make or model would be best, but if you wear a helmet, try different goggles with the helmet and look for the best fit beween the top of the goggle and the helmet.  Forehead freeze is not good.

 

Jack

post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
I use a Giro(G10 I think) helmet. I have tried several goggles, but comfort has never been an issue as far as I can recall.

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post #5 of 22

My son has a pair of Oakley  - Seth Morrison goggles he's been using for 3 years now - likes them a lot .

 

I've been using Smith I/O goggles, they're ok, but honestly a little dissappointed in them, - leak a little cold air between face and foam sometimes - not a fit issue, take a look at the layers of foam and compare to the Scott LCG and you'll see why.    We just bought the new Scott LCG goggles for another one of my sons - very impressed - seems like a great goggle, but only one day on the mountain with them so far.

 

The thing that they all have in common is that they all have spherical lenses - which I highly recommend. All three cost about the same,  about $185.

post #6 of 22

OP: In my opinion, your basic assumption is off. Most current brands have good optical qualities, and in any case, few of us have good enough eyes to register minute differences between brands. On the other hand, brands differ greatly according to their fit. And that's the real bottom line. If your googles don't seal well with your helmet in place, you're going to have wind and snow coming in the side, you'll get more fogging from moisture that the snow creates, and so on. So try several different brands to see which fits your face and helmet.

 

Then when you've narrowed it down, worry about the construction (double lenses, for instance, claim to prevent fog but in my experience once moisture does get in, you can toss the googles) and whether the lens is polarized (makes a difference if you ski in bright conditions). 

post #7 of 22

the ones that fit your face the best.

 

You should be concerned about your face first, then helmet 2nd.

post #8 of 22

+1.

 

It  depends on your face / helmet size. There is a huge range of sizes - one so called adult pair I got cheap off ebay is used my my 7 year old daughter, whereas I wear a large Giro helmet and most goggles look and feel like kids goggles on me. I tried pretty much every goggle in a few shops while also wearing my model of helmet and only a mid range Giro pair and the Oakley Canopy fit properly, so Giro it was. Key thing to look for is a close fit between the top of the helmet and goggle. Otherwise you will have a 2cm strip of sunburned and windblown skin on your forehead.

 

Another thing I'd recommend is buying boxed and unopened goggles. Ones which have been on display will have been cleaned 5x per day and the internal antifog coating will be non existent. Also get a reasonably light lens tint - it's not summer cycling, you will need to see the mountain in the shade at the end of the day.

 

I would not spend $300 on goggles as the $50-100 ones are functionally very close out of the box. After they get a few smears and a bit of snow on the lens there is even less difference.

post #9 of 22

What everyone says above about the fit is great advice.  Here is more advice: Consider lenses for both sunny and overcast days instead of one lens to do it all.  I'd rather spend less for goggles and get two lenses (or two goggles of older, less expensive models) rather than buy one super-premium expensive goggle with one lens.  Yeah, I know the weather is mostly cloudy.  But you will not want to squint on those sunny days when you need a darker lens.  If you do go with an expensive model with a "do everything" lens, do a quick Internet search and make sure you can get a lens replacement.  It wouldn't be a wise financial decision if you badly scratched those great lenses the day after you bought the goggles and had no access to a lens replacement.

post #10 of 22

If you're looking at Oakley and you ski in mostly overcast weather, the HI Yellow lens is their best lens for flat light conditions. The Airbrake model will come with 2 lenses, one for bright light and one for flat light. I don't think the bright light lens makes much difference, but make sure you get one of the combos that has the HI Yellow as the flat light lens. (I like it a lot better than persimmon lenses, which I think are the other low-light choices.)

 

These days, I think it's worth buying an interchable lens model. However, if you're not going with an Airbrake and you end up with another Oakley model with just one lens, the VR50 Pink Iridium is a pretty good do-it-all lens. The HI Yellow is not so comfortable in bright light.

post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thank for advice!
I'll have a look at the store today and hopefully make a decision.

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post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thanks for great feedback!

I went with Oakley Splice HI-Yellow. Will be interesting to see how they perform in cloudy weather.

I'm looking to get a new helmet as well. Taking into consideration what you guys have been telling me about comfort, I really feel like my helmet is too big.

Are there any good-fit, compact helmets out there? I have looked at a Trooper helmet, but it's over $370, which is out of the question.

Any suggestions is appreciated!


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post #13 of 22

Well, I guess the first step for you is trying the helmet *with* your goggle to test the fit. Make sure you have it with you.

 

As for good brands, hard to say. There are many :D

 

I usually try to go for a light model with good vents. Comfort is paramount (once it fits perfectly). My current helmet is an Atomic Nomad LF (LF stands for LifeFit). I have a rather large head and very few brands fit me well. Since you're looking for a more compact model, Atomic may not work for you. But again, try different models and brands and see what fits you best. With your goggle ;)

post #14 of 22

You need to try a few models, ideally with your glasses on to get one which comfortably fits your head.

 

Helmets protect you from abrasion and also reduce the forces from a sudden impact on your brain by decelerating your skull over a short distance as the padding and helmet compress. The latest marketing thing is to add a layer which absorbs shearing impacts (e.g. latest scott helmets). However, certification has not caught up with this to measure the effect, and it's not very clear whether helmets really need this given they shift on your head on impact anyway. The top of the range helmets are definitely better in terms of venting, quality of padding and chicness etc, but in terms of protection there appears to be little difference between a $300 helmet and a $50 helmet if both are certified to the same standards. Certainly when it comes to cycling helmets, the more expensive ones are designed to maximise airflow and minimise weight while still meeting a standard, so can be worse from a protection point of view than cheaper, thicker heavier helmets which have more depth of material to decelerate your skull on impact. Cycling studies also show that older EPS helmets work as well as new ones, so no problem buying last season's colour.

 

So really you need to make 4 choices on what to buy:

 

1) How many impacts does the helmet need to deal with? Either you can get one constructed like a skate helmet to take multiple impacts - typically constructed with a polypropylene outer and open cell foam, or a one-hit helmet either constructed like a bike helmet from EPS with internal plastic ribs to hold it together, or a motorbike type helmet which is similar but with a glass fiber outer layer.

 

2) What style do I want - race look, recreational ski look, skate look, mountaineering look, jet pilot look...

 

3) Does it fit my head / glasses?

 

4) Do I like the brand / style / colour? e.g. Giro (fashionable mainstream), POC (Crazy Swede), Scott (off piste shredder) Casco (Italian jet pilot), Shred (Liegety lover), Unbranded (Too cool to care).

 

Then you need to choose were to buy, either at the store who let you try on all their lids with your glasses, the internet, big box retailer... Typically there are some really good bargains around - my wife's top of the range Giro helmet was GBP30 from the UK as it was 2 seasons out of style instead of a crazy GBP150. Currently the best value helmet in Switzerland is from Landi, a kind of farmer's store, who is selling something similar to a Giro but with worse adjustment system but better goggle strap in matt black only for CHF39. Probably not a good idea to buy a one-hit helmet second hand. If it's at all cracked or compressed it's already had its one hit. And you often can't see cracks until you take out all the padding and flex the helmet.

post #15 of 22
Hey there!

I am in the market for a ski goggle for my wife who may ski 3 to 5 times a year. I like to buy her a goggle that is broad spectrum for a wider range of skiing conditions, decent quality and will last her for years. There are way too many options and it gets quite confusing. I would like to spend less than 100.00 if possible.

Any suggestions?

Cranedog
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cranedog View Post

Hey there!

I am in the market for a ski goggle for my wife who may ski 3 to 5 times a year. I like to buy her a goggle that is broad spectrum for a wider range of skiing conditions, decent quality and will last her for years. There are way too many options and it gets quite confusing. I would like to spend less than 100.00 if possible.

Any suggestions?

Cranedog


Look for a higher end goggle that's on sale.

 

Here's an Oakley A-Frame from Evo.com's sale:

http://www.evo.com/outlet/goggles/oakley-a-frame.aspx#image=57149/357459/oakley-a-frame-goggles-grape-wine-black-iridium.jpg

For Oakley, if I had to just have 1 lens for all conditions, it would be the VR50 Pink Iridium. There are a few on that page with that lens. 

 

This would also be a good goggle, though the Red Sensor is more of a low light lens:

http://www.evo.com/outlet/goggles/smith-virtue-womens.aspx#image=72600/356554/smith-virtue-goggles-women-s-black-dazzle-red-sensor-front.jpg

 

The Clymb has some POC and Scott goggles on sale, too, though I don't know much about their lines. 

 

\

post #17 of 22
My Costco has Bolle goggles ~$40 the last couple of falls. My wife finds them functional for cruising around the green runs.
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cranedog View Post

Hey there!

I am in the market for a ski goggle for my wife who may ski 3 to 5 times a year. I like to buy her a goggle that is broad spectrum for a wider range of skiing conditions, decent quality and will last her for years. There are way too many options and it gets quite confusing. I would like to spend less than 100.00 if possible.

Any suggestions?

Cranedog


Cranedog,

 

You are saving no money at all unless the goggle fits the helmet properly.  No one wants to look like a gaper or get wind in their eyes, right?  Also, get a lens that is OK in any light condition (it won't be great on a super-bright or foggy day, but useable) or a goggle that comes with two lenses.  In your price range, there are PLENTY of options.

post #19 of 22
So I realize that "make sure your goggles are compatible with your helmet" is Epicski gospel, but I kinda think it's BS. I have a drawer full of goggles from at least 5 different companies and I've never had a problem with any of them fitting any the helmets I've owned. They all come to about the same level on my forehead and there's no noticeable gaps or anything despite them being very different sizes (oakley elevate and anon m2 for example).

There are plenty of goggles that don't fit my face well, but I think as long as you have a pair that fits your face and a helmet that fits your head, they will work together.

Maybe I just have a very average head, but I'm not seeing this incompatibility that everyone worries about so much.
post #20 of 22
I've had them squish my nose down even though they were fine with an earlier helmet. I've had large gaps between the frame and the helmet edge (just what I want when the winds are howling at ten below). I no longer buy goggles online. I bring the helmet into the shop with me. Waste of shipping costs. You end up losing whatever the online savings were in returns.
post #21 of 22

Do not buy goggles off the shelf and especially not off the internet. Many people make this mistake and their skiing suffers for it. Proper vision and eye comfort is vital to good skiing. You will be very lucky to find a goggle to fit your face and be compatible with your helmet without professional help. The very first part of your skiing budget should be allocated to the best goggles you can afford.

 

The number one piece of advice is to seek the services of a certified and reputable goggle fitter.

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post
 

Do not buy goggles off the shelf and especially not off the internet. Many people make this mistake and their skiing suffers for it. Proper vision and eye comfort is vital to good skiing. You will be very lucky to find a goggle to fit your face and be compatible with your helmet without professional help. The very first part of your skiing budget should be allocated to the best goggles you can afford.

 

The number one piece of advice is to seek the services of a certified and reputable goggle fitter.

 

 

:rotflmao:

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