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Best action photo camera for skiing?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Look for a camera with really high quality pictures for action ski photos. Something easy to carry. I already have a go pro and its not very high quality so not that.
post #2 of 16

If you're looking for something that takes good still photos, I recommend the Panasonic Lumix FZ-200, very long zoom, constant f/2.8 aperature and it also shoots in RAW format if you want to be able to do serious editing.  It also has a video mode but I haven't used it much.  You can also attach filters like a circular polarizer or ND to it.  I also own a Nikon D200 and several good lenses, the Panasonic is the camera that usually goes with me anymore.

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
looking to do more action photos then stills
post #4 of 16

Action photos are stills.

post #5 of 16

Just make sure it has a viewfinder with rules out most P&S cameras.  DSLRs are bulky so have a look at the Micro 4/3rds cameras (Very happy with Olympus EP3 - used with EVF).

post #6 of 16

Check out the Cannon G15, G16, or G1X.  They easily fit in your jacket pocket, have a viewfinder, are great low light cameras and take fantastic photos. I have been using the G series for 6 years and have never been disappointed in the quality. They have a very loyal following and very high ratings.

Good luck!

post #7 of 16

The biggest difficulty in getting action shots with such cameras is the frame rate.  Most point--n-shoots shoot about one frame per second or so, which means you generally get ONE shot each time you pull the camera out and someone skis for a photo.  

 

Even P&S cameras that allow 10 frames per second give you only one opportunity to shoot.  That is, if you rip about four frames, you can't shoot another burst one second later.  The camera typically would be locked up  processing those four frames until about 5 or 10 seconds later.

 

That is, unless you have such a long telephoto that you get a couple of frames, some being a little too far away and others being too tight.  And one of the problems with telephoto shots is that they give no sense of place-- it's usually a skier with framed in solid white.  Or maybe solid trees beyond.

 

To show the terrain, shoot close and wide.  Shoot one perfectly timed frame as the skier comes by.  Or a burst of frames, if your camera allows.  Most of the best action shots that show the skier well (larger than a small speck at the head of a serpentine curve on a steep powder slope) are shot close up with a wide angle lens.

 

Good luck.

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

post #8 of 16

I just got the Sony RX100, II and it'll do about 6 fps in burst mode. 21mp in a pocketable camera. You can also get an electronic viewfinder.

 

I don't consider the Canon G series as pocketable. The 100S and later are, but the Sony kills 'em. I have the 95S for underwater and the 100S for other, but the Sony's completely taken its place.

post #9 of 16
Another vote for RX100. This is why I sold my DSLR telephoto. It's not the same IQ but good enough and it beats skiing with a camera backpack every time.
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
what about the canon 60d
post #11 of 16
Could never depart from a DSLR as a primary camera. I do see the need for a pocket am era for skiing ad the iPhone isn't it.

Now if I was truly trying to get great action shots of skiing, I'd still use a DSLR with a fast lens, probably 70-200/f2.8. Note, this is not a cheap solution, nor easily portable but doable in a backpack if the goal of the day is photos of others, not skiing yourself.
Edited by Sportsman - 12/29/13 at 4:05pm
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joeymw8 View Post

what about the canon 60d

 

I thought easy to carry was one of your criteria? The 60D is a fine camera (as is the 70d, the Nikon 5200 ++++), but if easy transportability is a criteria well the RX100 has a higher pixel count, and if you were to put a zoom on 60d of the same length, well, have fun hauling that around the hill.

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sportsman View Post

Could never depart from a DSLR as a primary camera. I do see the need for a pocket am era for skiing ad the iPhone isn't it.

Now if I was truly trying to get great action shots of skiing, I'd still use a DSLR with a fast lens, probably 70-200/f2.8. Note, this is not a cheap solution, nor easily portable but doable in a backpack if the goal of the day is photos of others, not skiing yourself.

A DSLR has a viewfinder!  The issue I have with the mirrorless cameras is the lack of a viewfinder (except for some Fuji models).  I have problems seeing a screen in the bright sun, and I imagine others do too. I disagree about the f/2.8 zoom.  There are plenty of good f/4 lenses that are much lighter weight, just as sharp and a whole lot cheaper.  Some have more reach.  If you are not shooting in low light, and most action photography on a mountain isn't in low light, the wider aperture lens is not absolutely necessary in order to shoot at 1/500 or 1/1000+ at a relatively low ISO.  The sensors are so good now that I usually set the f/stop and shutter speed and just let the ISO float to a predetermined maximum.  

 

I suppose we would all want to shoot our friends using a medium format camera with an 80 megapixel back, and having a full staff on hand with speedlights, wireless triggers and portable battery packs to make each action photo pop during the horrible mid-day sun.  That ain't gonna happen.  So the real question is what are we comfortable lugging around?  For me, it is something smaller and lighter.  The OP hasn't mentioned what he thinks, nor has he quantified the quality of the photos he desires.

 

When shooting action shots, an obvious key is the "ecosystem" of the camera.  The OP will need the right lenses.  Nikon is starting to mess around with this now, which I suppose is designed to push sales of their own lenses (see: http://www.diyphotography.net/nikon-changes-lens-mount-rocks-dslr-and-mirrorless-ecosystem-boat  );  For me, getting the right lens is all about tradeoffs.  For example, I can find an excellent f/2.4  70mm pancake for my DSLR that is super lightweight, or get a much larger and heavier f/2.8 that doubles as an excellent macro.  Or I can get a decent zoom instead of the primes, but be constrained by its size, focusing speed (compared to some primes), and  shooting where the lens is going to be the sharpest.  

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post
 

A DSLR has a viewfinder!  The issue I have with the mirrorless cameras is the lack of a viewfinder (except for some Fuji models). 

 

Plenty of mirrorless cameras with viewfinders and without the bulk of DSLRs: micro four thirds cameras from Olympus and Panasonic as well as proprietory systems from Sony, Richo, Samsung and Fuji (mentioned).  In addition, Nikon and Pentax have producted shrunken DSLRs, thought the sensor sizes tend to be closer to P & S quality.  Only issue is very few pocketable digital cameras with EVFs.

post #15 of 16
I don't know much about current point and shoots but I'd still think you are better off with a low end and smaller DSLR for action shots due to lag and frame rate. My wife has an Ollympus waterproof P&S that takes great photos but haven't tried action with it.

I agree lots of good f4 lenses (would love 300/f4 but wish Nikon would add VR) and I still use my 18-200/f3.5-5.6 because of the portability and flexibility. You're not going to get the bokeh of a pro lens buts that's ok for many uses.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sportsman View Post

I don't know much about current point and shoots but I'd still think you are better off with a low end and smaller DSLR for action shots due to lag and frame rate. My wife has an Ollympus waterproof P&S that takes great photos but haven't tried action with it.

I agree lots of good f4 lenses (would love 300/f4 but wish Nikon would add VR) and I still use my 18-200/f3.5-5.6 because of the portability and flexibility. You're not going to get the bokeh of a pro lens buts that's ok for many uses.

 

"I don't know much about current point and shoots, but I think you'd be better off with a low end and smaller DSLR for action shots due to lag and frame rate" :rolleyes.

 

If you don't know, then why would you comment? Again, a Sony RX100 II, shoots (at least) as fast as ANY low end DSLR (6fps), and has essentially no lag, with a megapixel rate far greater than any low end DSLR, and, in fact, more than the mid-range 60d that was asked about above, while shooting in RAW or jpeg. And, of course, there's full HD video and an electronic viewfinder available.

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