or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › 98mm ski for intermediate
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

98mm ski for intermediate

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Looking at 3 "98" skis.  62 yrs old, 5'-10", 180 lb,  10 years skiing,  Dark blue skier, all blues fine, occasional black.

 

Three skis interest me

 

Blizzrad Kabookie,   Solamon Quest 98,  Rossignol Experience 98

 

Love what I hear about Skiogik Ullr's Chariot TT, but figure that is a stretch for my abilities

 

My Fischer AMC73's  have been a great experience, but if I venture into 6" of powder I'm likely to do a forward flip when they dive.  (Actually I've done this in deeper pow)

 

Which of these will be the closeest to a 80/20 ski?

post #2 of 13

A couple of thoughts:

 

1. Where do you ski?  That makes a big difference in the type of terrain and snow you regularly encounter which affects (but doesn't necessarily dictate) what you might want in a ski.

 

2. Those 3 skis are definitely not all in the same group as each other, personality-wise.  So what is it that attracted you to those three?  Understanding why you gravitated towards them will help understand what you might be looking for.

 

3. When you say 80/20 do you mean 80% groomed?  I assume so but just want to be sure.  If so, I probably wouldn't recommend any of those skis, or any 98.  If you're going to be spending 80% of your time on groomed trails, a narrower ski would probably serve you better.  Something in the 88 range would still be much more off-trail biased compared to your Fischer's but would also be more at home on the groomed that just about any of the 98's.  The 98's that are best at groomers also tend to be the stiffest and most demanding of the bunch and therefore less suited for an intermediate+ skier.


Edited by jaobrien6 - 12/27/13 at 2:57pm
post #3 of 13

Line Profit 98 or a K2 Annex 98 are nice smack middle of the roaders for a 98mm. I'd steer clear of the Experience 98 for an intermediate regardless of your piste/groomer percentage ratio.

post #4 of 13

Gary,

I LOVED my AMC 73's.

I have not found another brand that has the same feel (the 'pop') of the Fischers.

Why not check out one of the new Fischers?

I can't find the Watea's on their website, but there seem to be plenty of last years models available.

I had the Watea 84's, shouldn't have sold them.

I ski mostly on Watea 101's.

I've got some Watea 94?'s that are a couple years old that I'm going to get mounted in a couple weeks.

I've tried some Dynastars and Heads but they just don't do it for me.

I might look around for some of the Motive's.

post #5 of 13
If you're determined to stick w/ a 98, consider the Volkl Bridge.

You can search and read other threads where I gush about it, but: super fun, super easy, lots of pop.
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by garyd5 View Post

Looking at 3 "98" skis.  62 yrs old, 5'-10", 180 lb,  10 years skiing,  Dark blue skier, all blues fine, occasional black.

Three skis interest me

Blizzrad Kabookie,   Solamon Quest 98,  Rossignol Experience 98

Love what I hear about Skiogik Ullr's Chariot TT, but figure that is a stretch for my abilities

My Fischer AMC73's  have been a great experience, but if I venture into 6" of powder I'm likely to do a forward flip when they dive.  (Actually I've done this in deeper pow)

Which of these will be the closeest to a 80/20 ski?
You have three vastly different skis listed, why did these three interest you? The Kabookie, is NOT a soft Bonafide, just a light Bonafide. The Experience 98 is a 98 that feels like a gs ski. The Salomon is a great choice for an intermediate that wants a 98 (shhhh thought, it's a 97) and a winner as an option. Other easier 98's are the Rossignol Sin7, and the fore mentioned k2 annix98 . It is tough to pass up the value of the Salomon at $499' killer deal.
post #7 of 13

If you are an intermediate skier and want to continue progressing your skills, I recommend that you ski something under 85mm underfoot in most conditions.  A narrower ski will give you the needed responsiveness and feedback to progress.  Sure, a 98mm ski can hold an edge, but you need advanced skills to do so.  Also, a 98mm ski can be very hard on the knees, when skied mostly on groomed snow, especially for us more mature skiers;) You can of course choose to have a second ski in the 98mm range to make learning off-piste and powder more enjoyable, but I just don't know too many "intermediate" skiers spending their days in conditions where 98mm skis perform best?  Here in Tahoe I know plenty of intermediate skiers that ski a 98mm most days, but I certainly don't see these skiers truly progressing their skills and would not personally recommend such a combo as a primary ski.  If your goal is an easy skiing ski that will make softer and deeper snow easier, there are a number of wood core around 90mm skis that may fit the bill as well.


Edited by ssm949 - 12/28/13 at 10:53pm
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 

I ski in the NW.  Crystal Mountain, Mt Hood, Whistler, Silver Mountain

 

Reviews make the 98's sound like they can do it all for everybody, but I'm looking to be able to get off trail when a pocket of powder shows up without trying to get my backside over the tail of my skis. So enough float to would be a good thing.  Just not sure the ski is out there that can be both at the same time.  Looking at skis that are light and flexible in the wider waist so I won;t have to wrench an old knee injury.  Have been skiing using my uphill ski to turn for a couple of years now and won't go back to riding the downhill one around the corners.   

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 

The more I read about the Quest the better it sounded.  Now if I could find a demo any where near the Seattle Tacoma area I could see if I want to clinch the deal.  Thanks.

post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 

Bought my kid some motive a couple years ago.  Strangely enough we both have the same shell size.  Definitely would consider the watea 96's if I could locate a demo set.  Thanks.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by garyd5 View Post

The more I read about the Quest the better it sounded.  Now if I could find a demo any where near the Seattle Tacoma area I could see if I want to clinch the deal.  Thanks.

Sturtevant's and probably Louis shop in Greenwater on the way up to Cystal will have them. Doubt that anyone is letting out their demo fleets at the moment though.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by garyd5 View Post

 

Reviews make the 98's sound like they can do it all for everybody

 

No ski can do it all for anyone, much less everyone.  Every ski is a set of compromises, and you have to pick what matters to you.  That said, you'll probably be very happy with the Quest 98 if that's what you do end up with.

post #13 of 13

Quest 98s (or Atomic Theory) skis are great.  Have you thought of going with a Rossi Experience 88 - if you get a chance to demo it, maybe add it to your list.  A bit narrower, softer than the Rossi 98, and a good all around ski.  The Rossi Exp 98 is a great ski, but really stiff and not all that playful off piste.  I have friends who ski both and they all agree they prefer the 88.  Anyway, one more input to help in your decision making.  No, I don't work for Rossi.  I have a quiver of skis and only my powder boards (S7) are Rossis.  Good Luck!  T. - wasatchreport.com

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › 98mm ski for intermediate