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First True Black Diamond

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I'm feeling pretty good about myself over the last 24 hours. I skied my first real black diamond run yesterday at Copper Mtn. I was bombing down Andys Encore and stopped about midway down, on my left was more of the same, on my right was Triple Threat and something new....I pushed through the gate and down I went. I'm hooked, and on to steeper and deeper! I credit a lot of my advancment to my new found confidence to my 2014 gotamas, they've given me that warm fuzzy feeling that I can conquer anything on the hill! I see the sierra chair in my sights!
post #2 of 20

Good on you Jason. Welcome to the wonderful world of wild snow.  The very best parts of most mountains are in places where no one else will ever see you.  

 

Now that you have tasted the fruit, learn quickly to respect it A LOT. Often the same run can be a different place on each run and show a different personality, kind of like a bear.  If it is happy a bear can be fun to watch up close, if it is hungry or out of sorts it might eat you.

 

Go out there but go with respect.  You gave yourself an incredible Christmas present, enjoy it.

post #3 of 20

Kudos! :D

post #4 of 20

That's great!  The trail is actually called Triple Treat but I bet a lot of first timers see 'Threat' :)

post #5 of 20

Good for you!  Next up, your first Double Black.  Don't forget to report back.

 

Happy New Years!

 

Rick G

post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
Its a whole new world out there now.smoking blues and skiing blacks. Thanks for the comments bears! We went to loveland today, I lived at chair 8 and had a blast on the plunge and subsequent blacks that leads to the return road. Even as much fun as I had skiing chair 8 today, my proudest moment came while skiing with my son after lunch. My six year old switched from skis to a board this year.today we legitimately skied chairs one and two together after lunch. On his second run up chair two he pointef to bennets bowl and said"daddy lets go that way this time" we disembarked the lift and without hesitation he skied his first blue pitch! I'm a very proud papa!
post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abox View Post

That's great!  The trail is actually called Triple Treat but I bet a lot of first timers see 'Threat' smile.gif
Steep, bumpy, and long...triple threat!
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
First green of the day off chair one

At the top of chair two...uncle in tow this time. It funny how when they find out a six year old is capable of making the two miles from top to bottom everyone follows suit!
post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
I did learn that equipment and run choice is alot more important than before. Extra long pow skies are a pretty big hindrance on steep tight bump runs.that whole tips on a peak tails on a peak and you in the middle can lead to a few issues...they're still manageable if there's room between moguls, but if its a true tight bump run.....forget about it. On a blue pitch this wasn't much of an issue.
post #10 of 20

I think all of us remember that first black run, and definitely that first ungroomed black with man eating moguls.

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Robertson View Post

I did learn that equipment and run choice is alot more important than before. Extra long pow skies are a pretty big hindrance on steep tight bump runs.that whole tips on a peak tails on a peak and you in the middle can lead to a few issues...they're still manageable if there's room between moguls, but if its a true tight bump run.....forget about it. On a blue pitch this wasn't much of an issue.

 

You want to initiate the turn high enough up on the mogul where you are not trapped in the trough and you can make the turn shape that you want to make to manage your speed.

 

A lot of beginner/intermediate skiers think the goal in mogul skiing is to stay locked into the bottom of the trough, and to make mogul skiing a luge run. In reality, riding the trough will get you to warp speed within a few feet, spit you out, slam you over a few bumps, and then its yardsale time.

 

If you watch good mogul skiers running a zipper line in the bumps, they spend very little time in the trough. Most of their limited time with skis touching the snow is higher up the mogul, with the skier managing how deep they are in the trough to dictate how much of the lip they hit to help bounce the ski in the air to reorient for the next mogul.

 

Don't be afraid to make your turn on top of the mogul to manage your speed and direction, THEN point the skies down into the trough, aiming for the next mogul to ride up enough to free the ski to make the next turn.  The trick isn't how to stay in the trough, the trick is reading how high you need to be on the mogul to make the turn shape you want to manage your speed.

post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

You want to initiate the turn high enough up on the mogul where you are not trapped in the trough and you can make the turn shape that you want to make to manage your speed.

A lot of beginner/intermediate skiers think the goal in mogul skiing is to stay locked into the bottom of the trough, and to make mogul skiing a luge run. In reality, riding the trough will get you to warp speed within a few feet, spit you out, slam you over a few bumps, and then its yardsale time.

If you watch good mogul skiers running a zipper line in the bumps, they spend very little time in the trough. Most of their limited time with skis touching the snow is higher up the mogul, with the skier managing how deep they are in the trough to dictate how much of the lip they hit to help bounce the ski in the air to reorient for the next mogul.

Don't be afraid to make your turn on top of the mogul to manage your speed and direction, THEN point the skies down into the trough, aiming for the next mogul to ride up enough to free the ski to make the next turn.  The trick isn't how to stay in the trough, the trick is reading how high you need to be on the mogul to make the turn shape you want to manage your speed.
noted, thank you for the insight. That was exactly my issue on the black bump run leading down beside chair four at loveland..splashdown or something of the sort.eithet tails or tips always seemed locked and I did have my first double ejection of the year over it....lol.none the less I gathered myself back up got locked back in, and finished on my skis.
post #13 of 20

This is absolutely great advice Anachronism and something I figured out after many a yardsale. Im at Park City right now and the lack of recent snow has left some absolutely huge moguls. This is exactly how i am dealing with them. 

 

Its working well on the black diamonds, but i've been eating it pretty hard in the bowls on the doubles. 

 

Meanwhile my 9yo continues to put me to shame. Goes from blacks to the terrain park on his board without missing a beat


Edited by Kardinal - 12/31/13 at 6:15pm
post #14 of 20

Good job!  You'll find that black diamonds will get much easier after your first.  Just don't get over confident because the risk factor is much higher on black diamonds and up, especially considering you can gain speed much faster.

post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post
 

Good job!  You'll find that black diamonds will get much easier after your first.  Just don't get over confident because the risk factor is much higher on black diamonds and up, especially considering you can gain speed much faster.

Yep. And the ability to ski one diamond doesn't always translate to another. Its strange how runs can be. I have certain runs ive had some bad wrecks on in the past(mostly blacks but even a couple of blues) and when i go back to them i'm always a little more tense. These runs are almost invariably not the hardest runs at their respective mountains, but I think for that reason I made the mistake of being to cocky on them in the past and now its a head game. On the more challenging, bumped up ones im usually so focused that i do OK

post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 
I'm bringing my shorter narrower skis on those non bowl/pow days in order to try out that advice. I believe the planks that have gotten to this level are going to hold me back in the bumps. They, or should I say I do pretty well as long as there's some spacing, but once they start stacking up and getting tight I start to suffer on my goats.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Robertson View Post

I'm bringing my shorter narrower skis on those non bowl/pow days in order to try out that advice. I believe the planks that have gotten to this level are going to hold me back in the bumps. They, or should I say I do pretty well as long as there's some spacing, but once they start stacking up and getting tight I start to suffer on my goats.

 

I actually forced myself to do it on my wides. It really made me concentrate on what i was trying to do and i think improved my ski control alot. Now that ive got the idea and technique somewhat down, i will occasionally go back to my 78 waisted skis and its even easier and i can actually zip some of those runs

post #18 of 20
Thread Starter 
Well I dropped my first cornice at parsenn bowl winter park monday...there will certainly be more of that in my future. It wasn't much, around 3-4 foot but it was on some of the steeper stuff just before the fireberry glade drop. I was skiing with the family so I only got to make three drops before heading back to the groomers. So far I have the kid skiing anything blue and the wife on groomer blues and away from the greenies where its really dangerous.
post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 
Nice view from atop the Pano Lift...a bit breezy and crusty immediatly skiers left, but the snow was really nice on the protected side of the bowl.


post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 
I was hoping vasquez cirque was open but it appears to need quite a bit of snow still.
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