or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Looking to move up to a 98mm All Mountain ski for my "one ski quiver" - suggestions?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Looking to move up to a 98mm All Mountain ski for my "one ski quiver" - suggestions?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

I'd consider myself an advanced skier.  I'm 44, 190 lbs., and have skied for about 35 years.  I'll ski almost anything - steeps, chutes, double black bump runs, groomed, back country, etc., with varying degrees of success. By that I mean, that it isn't always a thing of beauty, but I survive and have fun. I ski mostly Vail - about 30% steep, groomed and 70% back bowls.

 

I also alternate between quick turns from the days of my youth, and more carved, GS-like turns.   My current skis are Dynastar Sultan 85s which have served me pretty well.  But a few deep powder days in Vail's Blue Sky Basin last season had me wishing I had something wider underfoot with more float.   

 

I've looked at Brahmas and Kendos, but the difference between those and my Sultans, in terms of width, seems pretty negligible.  I figure if I'm going to get new skis, I should probably move to at least 98mm.  Aside from the Bonafides, what else should I consider? 

 

I'll be in Vail in February and would like to have a list of 3-4 skis I can demo before making a decision.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Max  

post #2 of 28

It's a little wider at 106, but do put the Soul 7 on your demo list. I don't think you will be disappointed.

post #3 of 28
Go with a Bonafide. It fits your description to a T. You will see a huge performance jump from the Sultans.

Other skis to try are Rossi ex98, Soul7 and Cham107, Nordica Hell&back, all will carve and float better than your Sultans. But Bonafide will be my first choice. While you are demoing, try a Kastle mx88. It's only 88 but a terrific ski.
post #4 of 28

I like an 88 better than a 98 for Vail.   On 80% of days when there is no new snow at Vail everything gets very bumped out.   I've found an 88 is a much better bump ski than a 98 because it's quicker edge to edge, and in firmer bumps having a ski a lot wider than your boot sole creates weird angular forces on your joints.  So, for me a 90ish ski is about as wide as I enjoy in bumps... which you see a lot of in CO!

 

So I'd suggest trying the Kendo, Brahma, Steadfast, E88, mx88 in addition to the 98's you are considering.  IMO Vail really calls for either a two ski quiver, or learning to ski and enjoy powder on, god forbid, a little narrower ski.  

 

This is a bit of a pet peeve of mine, as I know several people who bought wider skis (usually 105+), stopped skiing bumps as a result, and now just ski on powder days or groomers, which many of the wider skis do very well.   But on the 80% of days with no new snow, they are not interested in skiing most the mountain that is bumped out.  What fun is that?

post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

Go with a Bonafide. It fits your description to a T. You will see a huge performance jump from the Sultans.

Other skis to try are Rossi ex98, Soul7 and Cham107, Nordica Hell&back, all will carve and float better than your Sultans. But Bonafide will be my first choice. While you are demoing, try a Kastle mx88. It's only 88 but a terrific ski.

This ^^^

post #6 of 28

Do you still like your Sultan for bumps and no-new-snow days? Keep them for that and go a little wider than 98.

post #7 of 28

As an OSQ, the ~~ 98's make a lot of sense for a western skier. While some of the 10X skis are nice, they are mostly pretty soft snow biased and at least for my own tastes, don't offer enough balance between soft and firm conditions to be your one ski. There are a ton of great choices in that 98mm width range. Rather than use the "shotgun approach" I might suggest you approach it like this. Keep in mind the day! Is it soft snow everywhere or is there some firm snow available, or is it mostly firm everywhere? If you can find a run with with a mix of conditions available that's best. One or two runs (max) per ski should do it. Try and get the first run through the list done before lunch. Remember the conditions. If it was soft everywhere, you may end up liking a softer ski better. If it is firm everywhere, the opposite may be the case.Take a rest and review your conclusions. Take a run or two after lunch on your winner just to confirm it.

 

Try two medium-stiff flex skis first:

 

Bonafide: metal layup,smooth and damp, tip and tail rocker.

Nordica Hell and Back: glass and carbon, light and energetic, tip rocker only flat tail.

 

Choose which of these two you like the best and then try an alternate from that;

 

If you like the Bonafide best, try a Rossi E-98: A fair bit stiffer and more sidecut.

If you like the Helen best, try a Sollie Quest 98 or K2 Annex 98. Both a little softer than the Helen with flattish tails.

 

That should about do it.

 

SJ

post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the quick and sage advice!  My Sultans are fine in the bumps.  Not great by any means, but bumps are more work for me at my age anyway.  

 

That said, as tball pointed out, much of Vail gets 'bumped out' if there's no new snow in which case, I could just ski my Sultans. Since I'm not getting rid of them, I guess I'll end up with a 2-ski quiver. With that in mind, adding something more along the lines of the Bonafides makes sense to me but at least I have a few other choices to consider. 

 

Hopefully, the rental places have them available when I'm out there! 

post #9 of 28
Bonafide is not a "wide" ski for a quiver, it's too stiff for real soft snow. Just about any 10x ski will be better than Bones in powder.
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxandersonjr View Post
 

Thanks for the quick and sage advice!  My Sultans are fine in the bumps.  Not great by any means, but bumps are more work for me at my age anyway.  

 

That said, as tball pointed out, much of Vail gets 'bumped out' if there's no new snow in which case, I could just ski my Sultans. Since I'm not getting rid of them, I guess I'll end up with a 2-ski quiver. With that in mind, adding something more along the lines of the Bonafides makes sense to me but at least I have a few other choices to consider. 

 

Oh good, a 2-ski quiver is much better, of course!  For your wider ski, you really want a softer ski than the Bonafide, E98 or Mantra, etc.

 

@SierraJim's list of softer 98's up above would be better, but you may want to go wider with 2 skis and try his list of 10X's if you get some soft snow:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim 
 

The Soul 7 may have promise for sure as will the Nordie Vagabond, possibly the Sollie R2 106 and others that I possibly haven't seen yet. However, that same promise is available right now with the Head Rev 105 and Atomic Ritual.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/117234/2014-gear-105mm-and-rethinking-that-quiver-thing/180#post_1540202

 

That LONG thread he started is worth a read on creating a 2 ski quiver:

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/117234/2014-gear-105mm-and-rethinking-that-quiver-thing

 

Here are the cliff notes:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

 

..... if you are truly deprived and can only manage two skis. It lays out like this.

 

  • Hard/Mixed...........85-90mm with a bit of a hard snow bias. These are just as good as a 98 in 6" of new and better when there is no new snow.

 

  • Mixed to Deep.......102-108mm with a bit of a soft snow bias. Better than a 98 in 12" of new and really good up to 24"

 

post #11 of 28

Some skis I like in that width range, and quickie reviews. Disclaimer; we sell some, but not all, of these models.  I am 5 foot 9, 155lbs.

 

Nordica Hell n'Back: fairly stout ski, light on the snow, no speed limit, probably best for heavier skiers; bounces me around a bit

Nordica Soul Rider: if you want something softer and more playful, yet still a great carver and bump ski, look here!  Great ski

Kastle FX94: this ski rips in off-piste conditions and is a decent carver.  You won't be disappointed. Refined and subtle, powerful.  

Kastle MX88: all-mountain rocket ship. Easy to ski, refined, wide GS on the groomers. Best carver here.

Kastle BMX98: a softer, more playful all-mountain ski. Might be too soft for you, but I like it, mostly in bumps/off-piste. 

Rossi EXP 98: powerful, more carvy feeling all-mountain ride.  Very good in bumps

Rossi Soul 7: playful, soft, very quick, not super substantial though at speed.  

Stockli Stormrider 95/100: worth a demo: smooth, powerful, refined, no better carver in this width, excellent in bumps

Blizzard Bonafide: stout, powerful, very stable and confident ski.  Nice tip profile in softer snow and trees

Blizzard Kabookie: a little softer version of the Bonafide. Everything that ski is, but superior for us lighter skiers, or if you ski a lot of bumps

Blizzard Peacemaker: very playful, relatively stable, best in soft snow and off-piste.  Can be compared to the Soul 7, but a bit more serious and stable. 

Fischer Watea 96: fairly light, playful ski, not the most stable.  Somewhat akin to a Soul 7, but with a bit more damp feel. Fun.

ON3P Vicik: very powerful off-piste weapon, reasonable carver, no top end really.  Really an 80% off-piste ski though

Volkl Mantra: powerful all-mountain ride.  Stable, not the most smooth, lots of raw horsepower and edge grip. 

post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxandersonjr View Post
 

Thanks for the quick and sage advice!  My Sultans are fine in the bumps.  Not great by any means, but bumps are more work for me at my age anyway.  

 

That said, as tball pointed out, much of Vail gets 'bumped out' if there's no new snow in which case, I could just ski my Sultans. Since I'm not getting rid of them, I guess I'll end up with a 2-ski quiver. With that in mind, adding something more along the lines of the Bonafides makes sense to me but at least I have a few other choices to consider. 

 

Hopefully, the rental places have them available when I'm out there! 

Of course, you've just totally changed the parameters of the original question. ;) IMO if you're going to keep the Sultans for bumps and normal Colorado days, then I'd add at least 20 mm for a soft snow ski. Which takes you into the land of the "100-somethings" and beyond. Otherwise, you're creating a lot of overlap for a comparatively slight gain in soft snow. 

 

Some ideas for Vail: If you like smooth and powerful, want to aim more at charging broken snow, then the Stockli Stormrider 107, Kastle BMX108, or Cochise would seem like a starting point for a guy your size. If you like quicker and looser in tight places, want to aim more at new powder, then the Soul 7, Patron, or Gotama come to mind. 

post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Some ideas for Vail: If you like smooth and powerful, want to aim more at charging broken snow, then the Stockli Stormrider 107, Kastle BMX108, or Cochise would seem like a starting point for a guy your size. If you like quicker and looser in tight places, want to aim more at new powder, then the Soul 7, Patron, or Gotama come to mind.

Charging broken snow at Vail? Vail doesn't really get much of that, unless you're there on a 12"+ powder day or for a run when they open it for the first time of the season. At Vail, you're skiing groomers or bump runs with powder on top (or tight trees). What you,re describing makes more sense at Breckenridge, Arapahoe Basin or Loveland - places with alpine terrain and a lot of wind. A charger ski makes very little sense to me on that mountain. Playful and quick does.
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post
 

Some skis I like in that width range, and quickie reviews. Disclaimer; we sell some, but not all, of these models.  I am 5 foot 9, 155lbs.

 

Nordica Hell n'Back: fairly stout ski, light on the snow, no speed limit, probably best for heavier skiers; bounces me around a bit

Nordica Soul Rider: if you want something softer and more playful, yet still a great carver and bump ski, look here!  Great ski

Kastle FX94: this ski rips in off-piste conditions and is a decent carver.  You won't be disappointed. Refined and subtle, powerful.  

Kastle MX88: all-mountain rocket ship. Easy to ski, refined, wide GS on the groomers. Best carver here. Except if you include the  Elan Amphibio XTI88... :-)

Kastle BMX98: a softer, more playful all-mountain ski. Might be too soft for you, but I like it, mostly in bumps/off-piste. 

Rossi EXP 98: powerful, more carvy feeling all-mountain ride.  Very good in bumps

Rossi Soul 7: playful, soft, very quick, not super substantial though at speed.  

Stockli Stormrider 95/100: worth a demo: smooth, powerful, refined, no better carver in this width, excellent in bumps

Blizzard Bonafide: stout, powerful, very stable and confident ski.  Nice tip profile in softer snow and trees

Blizzard Kabookie: a little softer version of the Bonafide. Everything that ski is, but superior for us lighter skiers, or if you ski a lot of bumps

Blizzard Peacemaker: very playful, relatively stable, best in soft snow and off-piste.  Can be compared to the Soul 7, but a bit more serious and stable. 

Fischer Watea 96: fairly light, playful ski, not the most stable.  Somewhat akin to a Soul 7, but with a bit more damp feel. Fun.

ON3P Vicik: very powerful off-piste weapon, reasonable carver, no top end really.  Really an 80% off-piste ski though

Volkl Mantra: powerful all-mountain ride.  Stable, not the most smooth, lots of raw horsepower and edge grip. 

post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Lindahl View Post

Charging broken snow at Vail? Vail doesn't really get much of that, unless you're there on a 12"+ powder day or for a run when they open it for the first time of the season. At Vail, you're skiing groomers or bump runs with powder on top (or tight trees). What you,re describing makes more sense at Breckenridge, Arapahoe Basin or Loveland - places with alpine terrain and a lot of wind. A charger ski makes very little sense to me on that mountain. Playful and quick does.

 

It's really tough to pick a ski for powder morning at Vail.   It's going to get skied up and bumped out, but you can still find stashes all day.   Add to that all the different exposures ski very differently, and it's next to impossible to switch skis.  Whatever ski you pick on a powder morning better be fun in pretty much every other condition.    I think one of the softer flexing 100ish ski is a safe choice.  I'd likely just stay on my all-mountain 90 and leave my 110 at home, but others ski the 110 even when there is nothing new.  So many folks come up with a different right answer.

post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxandersonjr View Post
 

 But a few deep powder days in Vail's Blue Sky Basin last season had me wishing I had something wider underfoot with more float.   

 

 

Brian, here's the relevant quote from OP. I was going by his criteria. Elsewhere he mentions liking GS turns, skiing most everything, a Bonafide, and he weighs 190 lbs. And later in his second post, he mentions keeping his 85 mm Sultans. So not sure what he's asking for is a quick and playful ski. This may be an issue of whether our mission is to respond to an OP's questions as directly as possible, or persuade them that they're looking for the wrong gear. If I get a guy who's been skiing 35 years, and is familiar with the place he's asking about, I tend to go with direct response. :dunno

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Lindahl View Post


Charging broken snow at Vail? Vail doesn't really get much of that, unless you're there on a 12"+ powder day or for a run when they open it for the first time of the season. At Vail, you're skiing groomers or bump runs with powder on top (or tight trees). What you,re describing makes more sense at Breckenridge, Arapahoe Basin or Loveland - places with alpine terrain and a lot of wind. A charger ski makes very little sense to me on that mountain. Playful and quick does.
post #17 of 28

You think that you will keep the Sultan... But I'm not sure you will if you buy another ski in the 80-98 range... The sultan was a good do-it-all ski but excel only in crud and not at top speed.And carving and bumps? Just ok... Almost all of the new all-mountain skis can now do much better than the sultan... so you should look for a 1-ski quiver and maybe keep the sultan as rock skis or if you find that they are better than your new skis for one particular ski conditions...IMHO...

 

Also, if you didn't demo since the Sultan, you should demo a lot, trying skis with different type of rocker since you're not used to rocker...

post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxandersonjr View Post
 

I'd consider myself an advanced skier.  I'm 44, 190 lbs., and have skied for about 35 years.  I'll ski almost anything - steeps, chutes, double black bump runs, groomed, back country, etc., with varying degrees of success. By that I mean, that it isn't always a thing of beauty, but I survive and have fun. I ski mostly Vail - about 30% steep, groomed and 70% back bowls.

 

I also alternate between quick turns from the days of my youth, and more carved, GS-like turns.   My current skis are Dynastar Sultan 85s which have served me pretty well.  But a few deep powder days in Vail's Blue Sky Basin last season had me wishing I had something wider underfoot with more float.   

 

I've looked at Brahmas and Kendos, but the difference between those and my Sultans, in terms of width, seems pretty negligible.  I figure if I'm going to get new skis, I should probably move to at least 98mm.  Aside from the Bonafides, what else should I consider? 

 

I'll be in Vail in February and would like to have a list of 3-4 skis I can demo before making a decision.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Max  

Edit: I didn't realize I had already responded to this post!  Anyways, I cleared the cobwebs out of my head to remember my old 94's, which I did like in many, but not all, conditions. 

 

 

 

Hi Max,

 

I had the Sultan 94 for awhile, and have skied the Brahma and Bushwacker, as well as the larger Bonafide and Kabookie.  Here are some quick comparos:

 

Grooomers: Blizzards (definitely the metal skis, and somewhat the Kabookie/BW as being more exciting, stable at speed, GS-oriented) get the nod.  I didn't care for the 94 on groomers; the tip felt odd, the ski too dead.  Blizzard's rip on groomers; not the most exciting, but certainly stable.  

 

Bumps: Softer tip and tail, better flex pattern, the Sultan is equal to the BW, and I like it better than the rest of the list.  Some of my most confident bump skiing ever at Squaw on West Face was on the 94.  

 

Crud: at moderate speeds, the BW and 94 are fairly similar.  You can power through crud at speed better on the metal laminate Blizz models, as well as the Kabookie.  Bit higher speed limit on the Kabookie, much higher on the Brahma/Bonafide.  

 

Edge grip; favors the Brahma and Bonafide.

 

Trees: at moderate speeds, the 94 is an awesome tree ski.  The BW and Kabookie are also excellent as well. The Brahma and Bonafide make me work harder in the trees, but are very rewarding if I ski well.  Less forgiving if I don't.  

 

The Blizzard lineup has a 180 degree difference in feel from the Blizzard lineup. If you like the Sultan feel, you may want to check out stuff from Rossi and K2, the feel tends to be more along the lines of Dynastar.  Head also is more on the damp side (REV 98). I wish Dynastar made a wide 98mm-ish all-mountain ski, but alas, they don't.  

 

The ideal ski for you would be a wider version of the current Outland 87 from Dynastar (to get the extra width you want and the update to the Sultan design).  That ski is one of the best on the hill, but more importantly, is characteristic Dynastar in feel.  

 

Other skis in that width range to look at: Kastle FX94, Stockli Stormrider 95 or 100, Rossignol Experience 98 (underrated but sweet), Nordica H&B (similar to Blizzard's snow feel), Head REV 98.  

 

Another poster mentioned the Soul 7. While it is a great ski, it feels totally unlike the Sultan 94.  You will either like it or you won't.  

post #19 of 28
I've skied most of the skis on dawgs suggestion list (including the elan 88xti suggested by mogsie) and they are all pretty dang good. Hard to go wrong with any of em. For what it's worth I ended up with the blizzard peacemaker and the elan 88xti for my quiver. Best blend of power and finesse that I found in that bunch.
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skeebum View Post

I've skied most of the skis on dawgs suggestion list (including the elan 88xti suggested by mogsie) and they are all pretty dang good. Hard to go wrong with any of em. For what it's worth I ended up with the blizzard peacemaker and the elan 88xti for my quiver. Best blend of power and finesse that I found in that bunch.

 

Yeah, the 88xti is a sweet ride!  We stopped carrying Elan last year due to poor brand recognition, I sometimes forget about how much I liked that ski!

post #21 of 28

I managed to demo the Elan 88XTi mid-last year in 186cm.  Such a smooth and stable ride.  Quoting from my notes "... wide-shouldered and burly ski ... in this length they're not as nimble as some others ... decide where you want to go, make your turn and go there with authority and gravitas."  For me they were the most stable ski of the weekend in the junky, refrozen crud we were skiing, most likely as a result of the extra length.

 

Great skis.  I'd probably opt for the 178 on my crowded home hill.

post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinbad7 View Post
 

I managed to demo the Elan 88XTi mid-last year in 186cm.  Such a smooth and stable ride.  Quoting from my notes "... wide-shouldered and burly ski ... in this length they're not as nimble as some others ... decide where you want to go, make your turn and go there with authority and gravitas."  For me they were the most stable ski of the weekend in the junky, refrozen crud we were skiing, most likely as a result of the extra length.

 

Great skis.  I'd probably opt for the 178 on my crowded home hill.

I would love to try the 186 cm! I have a 178  that I like a lot but feel that they are too short for my liking...

post #23 of 28
Mogsie, I have owned the mx88 in 178 and the I own the elan 88xti in 186. Skied both a lot. My thoughts (6'1" 220 lb): both are exceptional skis but there are some differences for sure. The elan has a radius of 19 m at 186 which gives it a very nice versatility of quick turns or larger GS turns. Piece of cake to lay down fast slalom turns and also super stable as GS turns. 178 mx88 at least for me felt more locked into its 20 m radius. While I've never been on the mx88 in 188 I can only guess that it feels like an even longer radius GS ski. The mx88 178 held very well in most conditions but on the really really hard stuff the elan holds better. In soft snow it's a coin toss. The extra length in the elan isn't much of a detriment for turning and is a favorable characteristic for flotation. In hard bumps I really don't love either ski - but that probably is as much me as The skis. The elan is superior in crud when comparing those two lengths (I'm sure the 188 mx88 would be awesome in crud). So for me - in exchanging the mx88 178 for the elan 88xti 186 I gained a more smooth, quiet and stable ride at speed, better crud performance, more flotation, better edge grip without feeling like I had to move to a longer, heavier, less forgiving plank. I also added a more flexible turn radius as well which I love ( and is hard to find in a ski this size). I think the 188 mx88 is 22+ radius which would be more limiting for me.

So no regrets on the change and certainly no disrespect to the mx88 - fantastic ski. I just found myself desiring more than the 178 had to offer and scared to take the plunge on the 188. The elan 88xti 186 was a great fit.
post #24 of 28

Sounds like you're a happy camper. Excellent. FWIW, I'm 6', 165 and ski the 178 MX88. Yours was too short for you. But that said, agree that the Kastle has more of a GS-ish, planted feel than some of that genre (have not skied the Elan), and that it has that typical Kastle heightened snowfeel along with the smoothness, which can be disconcerting in crud. Not the top of the heap for swiveling through bumps, either. 

post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skeebum View Post

Mogsie, I have owned the mx88 in 178 and the I own the elan 88xti in 186. Skied both a lot. My thoughts (6'1" 220 lb): both are exceptional skis but there are some differences for sure. The elan has a radius of 19 m at 186 which gives it a very nice versatility of quick turns or larger GS turns. Piece of cake to lay down fast slalom turns and also super stable as GS turns. 178 mx88 at least for me felt more locked into its 20 m radius. While I've never been on the mx88 in 188 I can only guess that it feels like an even longer radius GS ski. The mx88 178 held very well in most conditions but on the really really hard stuff the elan holds better. In soft snow it's a coin toss. The extra length in the elan isn't much of a detriment for turning and is a favorable characteristic for flotation. In hard bumps I really don't love either ski - but that probably is as much me as The skis. The elan is superior in crud when comparing those two lengths (I'm sure the 188 mx88 would be awesome in crud). So for me - in exchanging the mx88 178 for the elan 88xti 186 I gained a more smooth, quiet and stable ride at speed, better crud performance, more flotation, better edge grip without feeling like I had to move to a longer, heavier, less forgiving plank. I also added a more flexible turn radius as well which I love ( and is hard to find in a ski this size). I think the 188 mx88 is 22+ radius which would be more limiting for me.

So no regrets on the change and certainly no disrespect to the mx88 - fantastic ski. I just found myself desiring more than the 178 had to offer and scared to take the plunge on the 188. The elan 88xti 186 was a great fit.

You know what? I was thinking exatly the same thing about the mx88 ( 178 cm)! I liked the ski but didn't find it super and it was lacking edge grip... But did some researchs on the net and epicski and founded posts where people said that they skied the mx88 1.5 cm in front of the line ( Beyound is one of them if my memory is correct). Tried it and WOW! What a change! The edge grip is now amazing and the carving is much better! Now, the mx88 has a lot more edge grip than the Elan 88, still float better, is better for crud ( 178 vs 178), I like both in bumps but maybe a notch more the mx88 and as for carving, well, they are different. I like both but for pure carving on nicely groomed snow, the elan 88 is superb; it is almost as fun as my F.A. 84 EDT! For carving in all other conditions: the mx88. For trees: like both!

 

So they are very similar except for the carving... In crud, what may differ for me beside having 178 vs your 186 is that I bought mine flat... So no xti system, so much lighter...

 

Would love to go to demos where instead of having 56 differents skis to try, you would have maybe 10 but they would have all the different lenghts!

 

post #26 of 28
Amazing how much a mount point can alter a skis dynamic performance. I have marker schizos on all my wider skis for that very reason. I enjoy playing with the boot position and it offers flexibility in differing terrain type.

I never tried shifting it forward in my kastles. That would have been neat to try. Maybe one day. Thanks for your thoughts mogsie.
post #27 of 28
And I would agree with your comments on the mx88 178 vs the elan 88xti 178. If you get the chance - try the 186 elan. I'd be interested to hear your thoughts. Thanks.
post #28 of 28

Another ski you should consider...the Liberty Variant 97.

 

We just received this ski for review, and based on my short time on it before our irritating rain-polarvortex-rain cycle the last two weeks, this is a serious contender for those who crave the GS turns.  The Liberty Variant 97 is not a surfy, floaty 97, but more of a precision cutting tool with super responsive feel underfoot and a prodigious edgehold. Bamboo core with titanal strip embedded into the topside of the core.  It skis much narrower than 97mm on hard surfaces, yet has the surface area to support you in the powdery surfaces.  Very impressive so far...stay tuned...

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Looking to move up to a 98mm All Mountain ski for my "one ski quiver" - suggestions?