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New here ... had a few questions

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I purchased Magna 8.0 Ti in 172 today.

 

I have done some research and it seemed like a good fit. I am coming over from Rosi Z6 170 ( very very heavy skis )

 

I am new to rocker, maybe someone can explain in lamans terms

 

 

I usually do not keep left and right skis, do I need to with rocker ?

 

 

I have Lange Liquid 120 boots. I was told that these are not the best boots for these types of skis.

 

I purchsed these boots at sure feet a few years back. If there is a better boot for this type of ski do you think that I could reuse my surefoot liners in a new shell ?

 

I have very very flat feet, my ankle bone protrudes a little so boot volume is always a factor can anyone reccomend a good carving boot with good foot volume.

 

Are carving boots more flexible than traditional boots ?

 

Any insight to my questions would be great

 

Thanks all !!

post #2 of 14

No left/right skis.

 

Rocker in this case is a slight rise of the tips and tail lessening the skis contact length on firm snow but helping it be more versatile on mixed and loose snow conditions.(it also can make the ski "ski short") There is only a slight rocker or rise on this particular ski.

post #3 of 14

I am assuming that you mean the Lange Fluid 120?  The boot should be fine with those skis.  There really isn't a "carving" boot.   I think your current boots will be fine.  Give them a test drive with the skis and see how they work for you.

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 

yes my apologies it is the fluid 120.

 

I was looking into the Salomon X Pro 120 boot.

 

my surefoot boots are very hard to put on and take off so Im considering a new boot.

 

Are the Salomons the only moldable boot ?

 

I read that these boots are easier to put on and take off due to the softer material

 

is this a gimmick ?

 

What about the heated shell ? will this be a better fit than my surefoots ?

 

I dont want to waste money but I dont mind spending for comfort ...

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpc12 View Post
 

yes my apologies it is the fluid 120.

 

I was looking into the Salomon X Pro 120 boot.

 

my surefoot boots are very hard to put on and take off so Im considering a new boot.

 

Are the Salomons the only moldable boot ?

 

I read that these boots are easier to put on and take off due to the softer material

 

is this a gimmick ?

 

What about the heated shell ? will this be a better fit than my surefoots ?

 

I dont want to waste money but I dont mind spending for comfort ...

Are your current boots uncomfortable when you ski? How do you like them as a tool?  One of the difficulties with ski boot is the variety.  I like to go to a reputable bootfitter and have them recommend boots, make me custom footbeds, whatever I need.  Custom footbeds will work for a long time and transfer to new boots.  The biggest issue with boots is foot shape.  In street shoes, anyone who wears the same size as you will fit the same shoe.  That's not true in ski boots.  Foot and leg shape plays a huge role in fitting.

 

If the only problem is the on/off part of ski boots, you are not alone.  A lot of ski boots are really hard to put on and take off.  Some people use a boot heater which make the "on" part easier.  The colder the plastic shell, the stiffer it gets.  

 

If you don't mind spending for comfort, then I recommend a bootfitting with a QUALIFIED bootfitter.  Be aware that salespeople are not bootfitters.  Where do you usually ski?

post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 

I ski in the north east mostly Mass and VT

 

I would say the boots I currently own are the most comfortable I have owned. I have been to some good outfitters out west when I was younger. I have fallen arches so back in the day they would just bulge the boot where my ankle pronated.

 

I am a sucker for technology. I always buy into marketing and I dont mind dumping 600 on a pair of boots. As for boot fitters, they all have there favorites.

 

Im not miserable in my boots but if some new technology would buy me the 3pm to 4pm range again I would be grateful.

post #7 of 14

There are too many variables to answer much of this very accurately. However................

 

  • First, what is wrong with your current boot? Not tight enough?
  • At times, I have seen boots from SF that were "upsized" and then used the foam liner to take up space.
  • The Fluid is a relatively high volume boot so re-using a liner from a fluid might not be practical in many other boots.
  • The foam liner may be one reason why the boot is hard to get on/off. A hot gear bag can help enormously with the 'on'
  • Some newer boots such as the Salomon will probably be easier on/off than what you have.
  • As mentioned, there is no such thing as a "carving" boot however, a boot that is snug and close to the foot is the best at transmitting your input to the ski and the Fluid was/is not the best at fitting closely.

 

 

You need to have a qualified bootfitter evaluate your current setup and he/she can give you better guidance in person than can be accomplished on the internet.

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpc12 View Post
 

my surefoot boots are very hard to put on and take off so Im considering a new boot.

 

Are the Salomons the only moldable boot ?

 

I read that these boots are easier to put on and take off due to the softer material

 

As a longtime sufferer in the trenches of the boot wars, I can say this much:

 

1) The only boots that are significantly easier to put on/take off are cabrios (three piece) boots. They are made by Dalbello, Full Tilt, and sorta by Nordica. But they involve other issues which may or may not make them a good choice for you. Moreover, if a two piece shell is too easy to get on and off, odds are that it's way too big for you. Or so soft that it's pretty much for beginners. Sorry for being the bearer of bad news, but the ritual of getting boots on and off is just part of skiing, really. Some brands have reps for being particularly tough - Langes come to mind - but none are easy. One thing that helps is making sure they're at room temp before trying. Don't leave them in the car at night, or put them in the trunk in the am while you go eat. Personally, I find it a lot more pleasant to put boots on sitting down in the lodge than standing beside the car in the lot, but YMMV. In any case, the fact your boots are hard to get on and off is no reason to dump the boots. Do your boots do what you want them to once they're on? 

 

2) Frankly, boots are fairly conservative in their tech; it's not like some models are computer controlled or made of piezoelectric materials. Companies use the same three or four plastics, maybe a bit of carbon so they can charge more, and the same fairly ancient design with two pieces and four buckles. Marketing departments make a lot of hoopla over microadjustable buckles, or a minor change in the last, or "adjustable flex" (couple of screws that can be removed). So being a sucker for high tech doesn't mean much with boots. And all upper level boots will do the job in terms of your skiing needs. So the deal's about fit. Unclear about Sollies being the only "moldable" boot, but AFAIK, they just use a lower temp plastic along the lower front side. Any higher level boot from any maker can be heated and stretched by a good fitter. Then ground for the details. So again, while a "moldable" model may be the one that fits you best, it might not. I wouldn't limit my choices just to boots that make that claim. Also, if you pronate enough that your foot completely flattens, you should have a custom insole that supports your arch. Among other things, this will reduce the functional width of your foot. 

 

3) Comfort to some degree inevitably represents a tradeoff with performance. Yep, the right fitter can make several higher performance models work for your particular feet, but work doesn't mean they'll feel comfy compared to leather boots you wear around town. It means they'll feel a lot better than the wrong models fitted by an amateur. Also, keep in mind that different brands have characteristically different lasts, so the shape of your foot, not just its length and width, are relevant to a good fitter. 

 

4) Cannot speak to SureFit, but I do know that a thick liner is not a solution to a shell that doesn't fit you. The liner will be inefficient at transmitting force from your leg to your ski, so you'll have to work harder and still will end up feeling behind your skis. Also, a thick liner will allow your foot to bounce around once it packs out a bit, and that'll result in some serious discomfort. The key is the right shell, not the right liner.  

 

5) So get thee to a qualified fitter, and ask their advice with an open mind, rather than showing up with an agenda, such as a liner you want to use. 


Edited by beyond - 12/23/13 at 8:04pm
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

I would love to meet with a great boot fitter. I will travel

 

Problem is how do you know a good one from a bad one ?

 

does anyone recommend a kick ass fitter in the NY CT area ?

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpc12 View Post
 

I would love to meet with a great boot fitter. I will travel

 

Problem is how do you know a good one from a bad one ?

 

does anyone recommend a kick ass fitter in the NY CT area ?

Here's a thread from 2011 to get you started:

http://www.epicski.com/t/97705/boot-fitter-recommendation-nyc

 

One way to look around EpicSki is to do a directed Google Search.  For instance, "nyc boot fitter: epicski" brings up a few threads.  Just be sure and check the dates of the posts.

post #11 of 14
Try Greg at Heinos in Pequannock, NJ. Make an appointment first, though. http://www.heinosskiandcycle.com. I've also heard good things about Keith at The Pro in hunter, NY (in town, not at the mountain), but I haven't used him personally. https://sites.google.com/site/proskiandride/.

It will likely involve several trips, so go somewhere convenient either to where you live or ski.
post #12 of 14

Here's a link to a shop in Vermont near Okemo.  They come highly recommended by some of the Eastern Divas from the skidivaforum

https://www.thebootpro.net/

 

This guy is also super highly recommended.  He's at the base of Mount Snow if you ever ski there.  One of the advantages of getting boots near where you ski is that it makes it easier for tweaks.  Expect tweaks.  The artistry of a good bootfitter is that they he/she can do little things to the boots that make a world of difference in comfort and performance.

 

Bootfitter's Name: Nick Blaylock
Name of Shop: Mount Snow Bootworks
Address of Shop: Mount Snow base lodge
Phone Number: # 802.464.4052
Website: http://mountsnow.com/bootworks/

 

Happy Holidays.

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the info.

 

I will be in VT next week and I will call before I head up

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpc12 View Post
 

Thanks for the info.

 

I will be in VT next week and I will call before I head up

Good luck.  Let us know how it all works out for you.  BTW, you are going to love your Magnums.  I bought my hubby the Magnum 8.1 ti for our anniversary 2 years ago, and I can't get them off his feet!  His other skis are whining that they're lonely.

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