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opinons on the Rossignol S3 - Page 2

post #31 of 50

I weigh over 200lb and just tried my new s3s they seem better than they should be on hardpack and I find them quite stable at the highest speeds I ski at. Very comparable to my k2 xplorers the reason I got the s3s was for taking on vacations to cover all conditions and they were crazy cheap on sale. I thought I would use the k2s for eastern skiing and s3 for west but I think the rossis may see more eastern skiing than I thought . I am a decent skier but far from expert and I think they are impressive but really good skiers may have a different take on them. I liked the xplorers in fresh snow and I think the s3 should do better based on the width and flex? The k2s are 177 and rossis 186 and they feel about the same length to me when skiing.Anyhoo I like them I like the k2s and most of the skis Ive tried in the last few years maybe I don't know what to look for but they all seem to work pretty good to me?

post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomkat1 View Post
 

I weigh over 200lb and just tried my new s3s they seem better than they should be on hardpack and I find them quite stable at the highest speeds I ski at. Very comparable to my k2 xplorers the reason I got the s3s was for taking on vacations to cover all conditions and they were crazy cheap on sale. I thought I would use the k2s for eastern skiing and s3 for west but I think the rossis may see more eastern skiing than I thought . I am a decent skier but far from expert and I think they are impressive but really good skiers may have a different take on them. I liked the xplorers in fresh snow and I think the s3 should do better based on the width and flex? The k2s are 177 and rossis 186 and they feel about the same length to me when skiing.Anyhoo I like them I like the k2s and most of the skis Ive tried in the last few years maybe I don't know what to look for but they all seem to work pretty good to me?

By hardpack do you mean ice/fake snow crap? Or do you mean fresh soft real snow that has been groomed? Two very diffrent conditions so I'm wondering. 

post #33 of 50

Tomkay1 I sent you a PM.

 

The information on this post is very useful, I don't have much to add other than I too am looking at the S3 and appreciate the information shared here.

post #34 of 50

The hardpack was a blend of real snow fake snow and icey patches I used my K2 the first day and S3 the second day typical crappy early season conditions in Ontario.I was expecting the S3 to suck but was pleasantly surprised at how well they held an edge.I kept looking down to try and see the tip flap but I didn't notice it so I stopped looking for it. I took a few runs as fast as I dared due to the conditions and they were good. I have heard people talk about the speed limit but it must be faster than I would ski so not an issue for me.

post #35 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricardo Snowmen View Post
 

By hardpack do you mean ice/fake snow crap? Or do you mean fresh soft real snow that has been groomed? Two very diffrent conditions so I'm wondering. 

 

Since this is an equipment thread, can you describe how a ski would respond differently between natural and manmade snow?

 

In addition how would you adjust your technique differently for these two different kinds of conditions?

post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomkat1 View Post
 

The hardpack was a blend of real snow fake snow and icey patches I used my K2 the first day and S3 the second day typical crappy early season conditions in Ontario.I was expecting the S3 to suck but was pleasantly surprised at how well they held an edge.I kept looking down to try and see the tip flap but I didn't notice it so I stopped looking for it. I took a few runs as fast as I dared due to the conditions and they were good. I have heard people talk about the speed limit but it must be faster than I would ski so not an issue for me.


Which hill were you at, which runs?

If you had dared, could you have skied faster on that hill and that run?

I'm just trying to figure out how slow you have to go not to run into the speed-limitations on these skis.  I could use a soft slow-speed bendy turny ski for trees, but I'm thinking thiis ski might be going too far, and something like an RTM84 or maybe a Kendo would work well enough without giving up so much.

post #37 of 50
post #38 of 50

I own S3s and like them.  They are forgiving.  I'm a level 8 skier.  I also own S7s, BBRs, and MX83s.  The S3s and BBRs are my daily drivers, based on how much I plan to be in the trees. 

post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricardo Snowmen View Post
 

By hardpack do you mean ice/fake snow crap? Or do you mean fresh soft real snow that has been groomed? Two very diffrent conditions so I'm wondering. 

 

how is it fake snow? does it not exist in this reality?

 

so this snow is coming out of guns and is decidely not ice, what gives?

 

 

ricardo snowman if you had any balls at all you post where you ski at , and your real name, so someone can come meet someone so legendary like yourself.

post #40 of 50

Soooo... it's been a Merry Christmas around here? What'd I miss??? Seems there's some reading for me to do.

post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by powderhound55 (formerly Ricardo Strongmen) View Post
 
  I'm done on here. . Goodbye

 

Cheers.

post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by powderhound55 View Post
 

Why would I want to put my real name on the internet for a bunch of weirdo's like you. . It's scientifically not the same thing as what falls from the sky. Fake snow has a smaller surface area. Also, fake snow doesn't instantly turn to ice, it takes at least a couple of hours after being groomed or skied on. Notice the guns blowing? Also, if you ever skied more than a day in your life you will notice a difference between man made snow and fake stuff. Try to ski through 2 feet of ungroomed fake snow vs 2 feet of the real stuff. Give me a break. Also, even if you groom real snow, it will still maintain it's softness and will not quickly turn to ice like the fake crap. Goto a ski area that has been groomed after blowing fake snow overnight, then go to one that had a real snowstorm that has been groomed. NO COMPARISON. Finally, banning my account was absolutely absurd. THe jackass's on here can't take an opinion different than theres. Also, the fact that you would think there's no difference between real snow and fake shit tells me you know nothing. I've never been to a ski area where people say something like that. They all hope for snow. Why?  I'm done on here. . Goodbye

 

 

I am seem to be doing just fine posting under my actual real name.  So we are the weirdos now? you came to us.....If you want to be gone then just leave.......I am sure the mods are going to ban this account as well.

 

I suggest http://www.tetongravity.com/ for a place where differenting opinions are welcome.

post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

 

I am seem to be doing just fine posting under my actual real name.  So we are the weirdos now? you came to us.....If you want to be gone then just leave.......I am sure the mods are going to ban this account as well.

 

I suggest http://www.tetongravity.com/ for a place where differenting opinions are welcome.


Josh this person is a lightweight compared to you now not to mention BWPA. In your prime you could rip off a 10 page post in 2 days ha ha. I don't get this person being banned. Yes he pissed off some people with some trolling but not really much different than many others have. I think he had some very valid points in some of his postings but he was abrasive, so was Highway Starr, gonzostrike(unclecrud), skistarr, scva and plenty others who don't seem to be around here anymore. Sometimes it gets a bit bland and new people can make it interesting.

post #44 of 50
Delete.
post #45 of 50

Hopefully people got the info they needed.

I don't understand why  powderhound55 (formerly Ricardo Strongmen) got all twisted up.  It's the internet, just grow a thicker skin and ignore people that are jabbing at you and aren't answering your question.

 

I have S3s.   The turn shape is as rossignol describes as their "powder turn", which makes it easy to do pivot turns and inspires confidence that you can reposition and put these skis where you want them to be (and not hit trees).  You can wiggle them really easily.

 

The length part is an issue.  On the groomers, subtract out about 10-15cm and that would be what they feel like in edgehold for an all-mountain ski.  (15 if you were measuring a fullcamber ski)

I don't understand the disctinction between hardpack and "HARD pack" and all that mumbojumbo.  If the ski isn't floating, just take whatever is your experience and distinction that you have for snow conditions from the length-equivilant all-mountain ski, and apply that same distinction onto this ski.  It's not like when you switch between hardpack and "HARDERpack" this magic ski somehow morphs into a snowboard and reacts to the change differently than other skis would react.

 

Factory edges are 1/1, so if you are on HAAAAAAAARDpack, the edge angle setup and your tune will be more of the reason why you would feel different, but switching the tune to like a 1/3 or something like that may cause you to lose some of the easy-pivot action.


Edited by raytseng - 12/26/13 at 12:43pm
post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomkat1 View Post
 

The hardpack was a blend of real snow fake snow and icey patches I used my K2 the first day and S3 the second day typical crappy early season conditions in Ontario.I was expecting the S3 to suck but was pleasantly surprised at how well they held an edge.I kept looking down to try and see the tip flap but I didn't notice it so I stopped looking for it. I took a few runs as fast as I dared due to the conditions and they were good. I have heard people talk about the speed limit but it must be faster than I would ski so not an issue for me.


Which hill were you at, which runs?

If you had dared, could you have skied faster on that hill and that run?

I'm just trying to figure out how slow you have to go not to run into the speed-limitations on these skis.  I could use a soft slow-speed bendy turny ski for trees, but I'm thinking thiis ski might be going too far, and something like an RTM84 or maybe a Kendo would work well enough without giving up so much.

 

Ghost, have you read the various east coast tree ski threads floating around? (They tend to thrive in the Feb - April time frame, for obvious reasons.) If you really want a tree ski, the RTM and the Kendo are probably not the best candidates. Yes, of course I have seen people ski trees beautifully on this kind of ski, but it's faulty logic to say that this means they're the best tools for the job. (I've seen Barnes and Geib out-ski everyone during a week at Big Sky, on race slaloms, but I'm not switching to them for my next trip west.) When you mention these skis, I sense a security blanket move. Respectfully suggest you not leave one foot on the diving board like that.

 

You will get lots of ideas on models from the other tree ski threads, but I want to make one comment based on my having been on the S3 and also having read a bunch of your posts. Two years ago I was shopping casually for this kind of a ski. The day I was on the S3 there was no fresh snow, but I did get it into a bunch of piled up sugar, maybe 6" deep, at the side of a run. In that stuff it was quick and fun on steep terrain and came around lightning fast when the built-in arc had a real platform to work with. (Beyond's point above, in part.) I can imagine it being a great confidence builder in tight quarters out west or on great snow day here in the east. On a true groomer surface I found it sketchy and utterly uninspiring in almost every way.

 

Later on in the season I tried a TST, which is about the same width, with a broadly similar design and intended usage. It, too, was - to use your words - "slow-speed bendy turny." However, unlike the S3, this ski was quite fun to roll through edge-locked short-radius arcs on groomers (provided there was a consistent surface). Both skis "ski short" on a firm surface, but the S3 felt completely out of its element while the TST was more like, "Okay, I can make this work for you too!" As a known slalom-ski enthusiast, I thought this account might be helpful to you. The point is not to try and sell you on the TST, which is not everyone's cup of tea, we have learned. The point is to suggest you get out and do some demos, and not just buy the S3 because it's low-hanging fruit at the moment. The Line Sick Day 95, which people seem to like a lot, or the Atomic Ritual, or one of the new Rossis might be worth trying in this category. No doubt the real gear mavens can name a half dozen more.

post #47 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

I'm just trying to figure out how slow you have to go not to run into the speed-limitations on these skis.  I could use a soft slow-speed bendy turny ski for trees, but I'm thinking thiis ski might be going too far, and something like an RTM84 or maybe a Kendo would work well enough without giving up so much.

 

Great post by qcanoe above.  In a different thread I ineloquently said the S3 stinks on firm snow. :)  I should have more properly said:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

On a true groomer surface I found it (S3) sketchy and utterly uninspiring in almost every way.

 

 

I found that to be true even on really nice groomer surface conditions.  I've bombed the S3 down the runs at Copper where the US Ski team runs their early season downhill course (Andy's to Rossi's) on a nice groomer surface.  Sketchy is a great way to describe it.  I had to hold back to maybe 70% throttle and even that was a bit disconcerting.  As a reference, on a Kendo on that same run the ski is never a limiting factor in my speed, just me.   

 

I actually enjoy the S3 much more at Mary Jane and A-basin where there aren't fast cruiser runs I seek out, rather the groomers are just a way back to the lift, which it does just fine.  I could live with the off-piste limitations of the S3 as a soft snow specific ski if I just skied at A-basin or Mary Jane, but since I spend most my days at Copper I don't think I'd even buy it super-cheap.   HTH.

post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

I'm just trying to figure out how slow you have to go not to run into the speed-limitations on these skis.  I could use a soft slow-speed bendy turny ski for trees, but I'm thinking thiis ski might be going too far, and something like an RTM84 or maybe a Kendo would work well enough without giving up so much.

 

I use the iPhone app called Ski Tracks.  I'm not sure how accurate it is, of course. It reports my top speed for the day.   On my S3s, at Canyons Resort going down Sidewinder (a double-blue rated groomed run that gets icy end of the day), Ski Tracks reported my speed as 47 MPH yesterday.

 

That is a bit too fast for the S3s for my skill level. I did not intend to get going that fast, but there was a fair bit of ice and I didn't feel confident scrubbing my speed off at that moment, and there was no one in front of me, so I just rode it out rather than risk scrubbing off the speed & maybe eating it.  

 

Other days gives me a top speed of 38 - 40; the S3s felt fine.  At that speed, I was very confident.

 

You don't buy S3s to bomb down groomers, of course.  For me, they give me confidence on bumps & in the trees, where I never worry that I lack the control on the S3s.

 

Of course, YMMV.

post #49 of 50
Hi,

I've also owned the 2012 s3 168cm. I'm about your size (66" 155 lbs w/gear), the same level skier, but unfortunately only 20 days per season, all in Northern NY and VT.
I would have enjoyed it a lot more in 178cm. In 168cm it felt like it had no tail at all.
post #50 of 50
I have the S3 in 186 and love them more every day. The only time I take them off is when its boilerplate because they will slide out from under you. On fresh or soft snow they are amazing. I actually prefer them to my SL Racetigers when the conditions are right and I ski in Wisconsin! As for out West? 2 trips to Snowbird and it was a joy. No bottomless powder days but abundant fresh snow above the boots. Great in bumps trees and groomers. I'm going to Telluride on Friday and it's the only ski i'm taking. 6' 215 pounds 46 years old
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