or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Where to ski in NE of USofA ?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Where to ski in NE of USofA ?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

We all tend to look at Colorado, Utah, California, Wyoming, Montana, Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Indiana (did I forget somebody - sorry bad geography) but lately I am tempted to go east and try some of the "other" great ski areas of the US. Jay Peak, Killington, Stowe, Sugarbush - I read about these areas all the time but let somebody with inside knowledge give a true recomendation where to ski for 4 days this coming January ? 

 

My wishes are:

 

Runs at least 1 mile long, groomers are fine, no long lift lines, no crowds midweek, chance to ski some trees, good donuts, fun apres-ski, affordable accommodation ...

 

So ... anything like this exists out there?

post #2 of 17
Well the "runs at least 1 mile long" will mean -yes we have that. Though if "runs" encompasses a couple trails then yes. Oh, before we get too far....Indiana??? In the same phrase as Idaho! Lol . Just cross that baby off. I assure you that no one thinks of the Hoosier State for a ski trip West.

How long a trip and will u do multiple areas?
Basics: Stowe, Sugarbush, Jay.
I say go to Maine: Sunday River, Saddleback, Sugarloaf
Classics, but your 1 mile cruisers would be a bumpalooza or woods fest with ice- Mad River. You could skip Sugarbush and do Stowe, Mad River, Jay
Stand by for Josh to say just go to Stowe:-) ...
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

I put Indiana just because it sounds "westish". I know it is on another continent - India.

Friend of mine lives in CT and we would drive out starting Sunday and back to CT by Friday night. No strangers to 6-9 hour drives. Is there such a thing as a "NE ski multi day ski pass"?

I am seriously exploring this trip as my alternative to January bad snow Tahoe issues.

post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by goranmilos View Post
 

Friend of mine lives in CT and we would drive out starting Sunday and back to CT by Friday night.

 

Vermont is the obvious choice if coming from Connecticut - especially if you're in the western half of the state. I appreciate Tog's vote of confidence for Maine, but you will spend an entire day each way to get there. By contrast, you could spend most of the day Sunday and another half day Friday morning if you do VT.

post #5 of 17

Hey I'm from CT as well. You picked a bad time to look for season passes as most have gone up in price ~dec 15th. The rule of thumb is, the further north you're willing to drive the better conditions you will find. Stratton and Snow had a "double down pass" 19-26 year olds 350$ and a couple of buddy weekday passes for each mountain. Their only 2 hours 40 minutes from where I am in Cheshire so it's totally doable as just a day trip if you are looking to go regularly on weekends.

 

That said, if you are willing to drive up to Stowe/Jay/Sugarbush, conditions are considerably better. Mad River Glen offers some interesting and unique terrain for experts that I think even people who dwell out west would enjoy. White Face is pretty darn good as well and has the most vertical feet on the east coast.

 

If you want a shorter drive from CT that's under an hour, hit up Catamount. It's a nice little hill that's easy to get to and in all honesty not that bad for how far south it is.

 

If you're going the Northern VT route, check out Burlington. It's a really fun town (city?). Plenty of stuff to do there, breweries, music, possibly the only place in VT that isn't mostly populated by cows.

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks Nikoras,

We would stay overnight for 4-5 nights.my friend and me both like cows - to eat and to eat ice cream as well, so no problems there. Beer is ok too.
Biggest concern is where to ski and not spend most of the time waiting in line just to slide down icy 1/4 mile hill? Also, I do not want to spend a fortune since for a little more money we could fly a further east and ski some big mountains. This is more like exploratory trip/ get together type of thing.
More I look into it more Vermont pops out, any local wisdoms to share? Like distances to drive, possibility of skiing few areas in 4 days, places to stay, eat, have fun , New England B&B's, that type of local knowledge would be helpful.
post #7 of 17

As for ice cream, the Ben&Jerry's factory is in Waterbury, VT, just down the road from Stowe.

 

For the ease of visiting multiple places without going broke, it's hard to beat staying in Burlington (or possibly Montpelier, but there's not much in Montpelier) and day-tripping it over to Stowe, Mad River, Sugarbush, Smuggler's Notch or Bolton Valley.  All of those are within an easy hours drive of Burlington.  Jay Peak is a little farther away, but still easily reachable.

 

Nothing will be crowded mid-week.  Everyplace in New England has tree-skiing galore; just most of it's not on the map.  ;)  There are a lot of Stowe locals on this forum (Epic, Josh Matta, freeski919) who can show you around.

post #8 of 17

I agree with Kevin in part, but with some caveats. If you're going to ski in the East, Northern Vermont is the best you're going to find, especially if you are coming from CT. Stowe is the top of my list. I work there, but I work there because it's my favorite mountain. Mad River is right up there too. Sugarbush, Smuggs and Jay are excellent as well.

 

I will also say that staying in Burlington is a great idea. I'm sitting in Burlington as I type, so I may be biased, lol. Burlington has lots of lodging, great restaurants, awesome bars, and an overall great vibe. However, Burlington is not a ski town, it's a college town. It's at least 45 minutes from most of the real mountains (Sorry Bolton, you don't make the cut). The drive to most of the mountains is pretty easy, other than Jay which is a bit of a hike. In Burlington you'll see plenty of skiers, and most of us regularly make the commute out to the mountains. But if you walk into a bar, its not going to be après-ski. If you want the serious ski town vibe, stay in Stowe, or in Waitsfield/Warren. It all depends on what you want, really. Either route you take is an awesome experience.

 

I think Nikoras may have misunderstood your question about multi-day passes. As  you're talking about a week trip, I doubt you were looking to buy a season pass. You are more likely looking for a 2 or 3 day pass at a couple places, or a 5 day pass at one mountain. Pretty much every mountain sells multiday passes. There are a few different ways to get a better deal. Sugarbush's multiday tickets cost less than buying individual day passes for each day. Smuggs has a lower rate for additional days as well. At Mad River, a two day ticket is a couple dollars cheaper, but if you get a third day, it's only one more dollar. If you're going to go to Stowe or Sugarbush, definitely purchase your tickets online, because the tickets are significantly cheaper online than they are at the window.

post #9 of 17

There are many resorts in the east as "big" as their western counterparts.  for instance,

 

Whiteface, Killington, Sugarloaf, Smuggs, Sugarbush, la Massif, Stowe, Sunday River, Gore, Cannon, Jay, Mont St Anne, Loon, Tremblant, Wildcat, Waterville, Stratton, Burke, and Saddleback all have over 2k of lift served vertical.  By way of comparison, Alta has 2005' of lift served vertical.

 

What you don't tend to get in the east is lots of area or the massive amounts of snowfall.  The snow tends to be firmer and the trails narrower. Tree runs tend to be tighter (a gross sweeping generalization with many exceptions).  It can be stupid crowded with lift lines rivaling Vail on weekends and holidays, but it thins out considerably mid-week as the norm is to drive up for the weekend as opposed to flying out for the week.

 

I like skiing the east and am looking at three trips this season (2 by plane and one long drive), but it's not for everybody.  The way to find out if it's for you is to try.  Just do it, and make sure you sharpen your edges before you go.

 

Look on-line for deals - if you buy in advance you can get tickets for about half off, depending.

 

BTW, NE stands for Nebraska - worse skiing than even Indiana.

post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 

NE, NorthEast, should've been more specific. 

Regarding tickets, I meant something like Lake Tahoe Six pack, or Salt Lake Superpass where one can ski multiple resorts within 4-5 days. I will talk to my friend today and suggest Killington, Sugarbush and Stowe and see what he has to say. 

Looking at Jan12-17, with ski days Jan 13,14,15 and 16th. 

Thanks for all replies.

post #11 of 17

I grew up as an eastern skier and love Sugarbush, Mad River, Killington. I moved out west to ski instruct and my first realization was how the mountains are pretty similar in vertical access, but start at much higher elevations. Back east now and miss the steep open double blacks,  but the Glade skiing in the east makes up for it.

 

I'd reccommend Sugarbush it has everything you are looking for and Mad River Glen is right next door and has all the glades/ woods/ bumps/ waterfalls you can ask for.

post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by goranmilos View Post
 

NE, NorthEast, should've been more specific. 

Regarding tickets, I meant something like Lake Tahoe Six pack, or Salt Lake Superpass where one can ski multiple resorts within 4-5 days. I will talk to my friend today and suggest Killington, Sugarbush and Stowe and see what he has to say. 

Looking at Jan12-17, with ski days Jan 13,14,15 and 16th. 

Thanks for all replies.

 

Note that Burlington wouldn't be a very good "base" for getting to Killington, but as mentioned above, it works pretty well for the various areas in Northern Vermont.  Burlington to Killington is probably about two hours; Burlington to Stowe or Sugarbush is less than an hour.

 

Killington does have an enormous variety of terrain and a massive vertical drop, but it's (almost) impossible to ski it continuously -- i.e., that vertical is from the top of Killington Peak to the base of the Skyeship.  Normally if you ski Killington you get about half of their listed vertical / run.  That said, they are the self-proclaimed "Beast of the East" and everybody should experience it at some point.  Love it or hate it, at least you formed your own opinion of it.  I just think it's a very different experience compared to Sugarbush or Stowe.

 

I've never seen something like the Lake Tahoe Six Pack or Salt Lake Superpass here in New England.  For whatever reason, that pricing model hasn't ever caught hold here.  Lifttopia or buying tickets on-line in advance through the resort web-site or good ways to get decent discounts.

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikoras View Post
 

Hey I'm from CT as well. You picked a bad time to look for season passes as most have gone up in price ~dec 15th. The rule of thumb is, the further north you're willing to drive the better conditions you will find. Stratton and Snow had a "double down pass" 19-26 year olds 350$ and a couple of buddy weekday passes for each mountain. Their only 2 hours 40 minutes from where I am in Cheshire so it's totally doable as just a day trip if you are looking to go regularly on weekends.

 

That said, if you are willing to drive up to Stowe/Jay/Sugarbush, conditions are considerably better. Mad River Glen offers some interesting and unique terrain for experts that I think even people who dwell out west would enjoy. White Face is pretty darn good as well and has the most vertical feet on the east coast.

 

If you want a shorter drive from CT that's under an hour, hit up Catamount. It's a nice little hill that's easy to get to and in all honesty not that bad for how far south it is.

 

If you're going the Northern VT route, check out Burlington. It's a really fun town (city?). Plenty of stuff to do there, breweries, music, possibly the only place in VT that isn't mostly populated by cows.

That's because Burlington although geographically is in Vt it is not Vermont. It's a really nice place to visit because it is so close to Vermont.There are more cows across the street from my house than people who live in my town. I like those numbers. Real Vt. is not in the cities.

 

goran why not start out your trip with a stop at Killington , ski it than go up Rte 100 to Warren/Waitsfield spend a night there then hit Sugarbush , maybe spend another night then drive up to Stowe, ski then look for lodging up there. You can get a sample of 3 or 4  of the states biggest ski areas and get a feel for what each has to offer in regards to skiing, prices, atmosphere etc. I know there is some driving involved but none of these areas, maybe Sugarbush, have any true ski in ski out lodging that is remotely affordable so drive to the areas. I don't find much difference in the inconvience factor with driving 10 minutes or 30 min. Still have to haul your stuff to the lodge either way. One option that takes some of the hassle out of it is to base yourself out of one area, B&B , motel etc. Warren/ Waitsfield good for that or Waterbury. There will be no one on the mountains in that time frame i.e. lift lines less than 2-3 minutes if not ski on.

post #14 of 17

Your midweek early Jan dates will be dead everywhere, no lift lines, but not much apres ski either.  It may be hard to find lively apres-ski, but your best shot for that is Killington and Stowe.  Burlington will be apres-college.  I think you would like two days Killington staying somewhere along the access road and two days Stowe staying somewhere near the town of Stowe.  Note that in the East there is no real equivalent to Park City, Aspen, Vail with considerable town right at base of lifts, only condos and a few shops and restaurants.

post #15 of 17

Whiteface and northern Vermont should be excellent, and both Lake Placid and Burlington are nice towns.

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by goranmilos View Post
 

NE, NorthEast, should've been more specific. 

Regarding tickets, I meant something like Lake Tahoe Six pack, or Salt Lake Superpass where one can ski multiple resorts within 4-5 days. I will talk to my friend today and suggest Killington, Sugarbush and Stowe and see what he has to say. 

Looking at Jan12-17, with ski days Jan 13,14,15 and 16th. 

Thanks for all replies.


If you could change your days to 1/10-1/12 Stowe is offering inexpensive tickets to ski club members. 1 day $46, 2 day $69, 3 day $101. If you don't belong to a ski club it's cheap enough to join one to get this discount. Just a suggestion.

 

http://www.stowe.com/groups/council/

post #17 of 17

Jay Peak and Burke share the "Great Big Kingdom Card"

 

Quote:

3 Days. 2 Mountains. 0 Blackouts. Just $169.

The Great Big Kingdom card is a three-day ticket valid at either Q Burke or Jay Peak. Can be used any day this season (days do not need to be consecutive), NO BLACKOUT DATES. The Great Big Kingdom Card is also fully transferrable.

 

Burke is typically very uncrowded, has a 2000' vertical, and has a lot of fun terrain.

Jay gets a lot more snow and typically has great powder skiing in the trees.

 

Drive straight up I-91 from CT 3.25 hours from Hartford, Ski at Burke for a day, then head up to Jay for the next two. Jay has a lot of lodging so you should be able to find a place there (Condo, three nice slopeside hotels).

 

Then head down Route 100 and find Smuggler's Notch, Stowe, Mad River, Sugarbush, and Killington as you progress south.

 

I'm not sure if there are anymore multi resort passes available this year (e.g. Fox 44 ski card) that cover the range of resorts you would like to visit.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Where to ski in NE of USofA ?