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Base repair/ P-tex

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

My local shop does P-tex work but when you do it they light the p-tex on fire and drip it into the marks. I looked online and all i can find is info on how to use a soldering iron for P-tex. Which way is better? How are people using Metal Grip for core shots? thanks

post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahlerscurtis View Post
 

My local shop does P-tex work but when you do it they light the p-tex on fire and drip it into the marks. I looked online and all i can find is info on how to use a soldering iron for P-tex. Which way is better? How are people using Metal Grip for core shots? thanks

 

That's how I do minor ptex repairs at home, the drip method.

 

There's also ptex guns you can buy also.

post #3 of 8

For core shots on the metal edge, I try and use a course sand paper on the exposed metal, then wax remover, just in case, then drip in the metal grip Ptex and add a little heat with the propane touch afterwards. 

 

Go slow and you'll be fine.

 

Don't worry it doesn't have to look perfect. My Kendos have a repair from a couple years ago that is still a little low, you can't feel it and they ski great.

 

You don't need perfect bases. Just lots of wax in them.

post #4 of 8

Good info on P-tex repairs using P-tex candles at:

 

http://www.racewax.com/t-ptex-base-repair.aspx

 

Though I've found that repairs seem to last much longer if you use a P-tex soldering iron with P-tex ribbon or string vs. the candles

 

P-tex doesn't stick to metal.  Thus the use of metal grip between metal edges and the actual melted in P-tex (when doing a repair adjacent to the metal edge).

post #5 of 8

I use metal grip for core shots and repairs next to the edge, covered by soldered in ptex ribbon. I don't bother fixing more minor scratches. Metal grip is too soft to use by itself. I pare the ptex flat with a very sharp chisel and then with a metal scraper--there are other ways but I have woodworking tools so I use them. My problem is getting the repair to feel smooth. No matter how flat it is it feels somewhat rough to the touch. Even after a base grind I can feel the repair. The roughness has no effect on performance of course, but I like to think of myself as a craftsman so it bothers me. Anyone have any suggestions? 

post #6 of 8

A better source of great repair information can be found

at http://www.tognar.com/base_repairs_tips_ski_snowboard.html

post #7 of 8

in our shop, we drip p-text for surface scratches. for deeper base weld repairs, we used to have a base weld p-text extruding machine. but now, we find its better to use a heat gun to simply liquify the p-tex on a metal scraper, then scrape it into the cleaned out hole. this way, its evenly melted, no carbon buildup and adheres better.

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by dictoresno View Post

in our shop, we drip p-text for surface scratches. for deeper base weld repairs, we used to have a base weld p-text extruding machine. but now, we find its better to use a heat gun to simply liquify the p-tex on a metal scraper, then scrape it into the cleaned out hole. this way, its evenly melted, no carbon buildup and adheres better.


 



Yea, know, I forgot, I kind of do the samething I have a flat piece of steel that I heat up and keep it over the repair to keep the Ptex more liquid. I'll try your version of that idea next time.

Thanks,
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