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Beginner Gear Advice (Bindings/Skis)

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I just caught the bug.  I live in Madison, Wisconsin.  Never went skiing until two weeks ago.  Took my young kids to have some winter fun and we all loved it.  We have gone 4 times in the last two weeks.  I don't want to keep spending for rentals and am looking for budget options to get me through the next season or two.  We ski locally on groomed stuff.  Short runs and I am just starting to mess around on the less steep blue runs and not really skiing parallel (but getting there).

 

I am 6'7" and 230 pounds.  Athletic build - I am a cyclist.

 

I found the 2012 Volkl RTM 73 online very cheap.  And I am looking at the Tyrolia LD12 binding (78mm) (one of the few bindings i could find with a higher DIN and narrow brakes).

 

Questions: Any reason these would not be good choices?  And, is there an advantage to having bindings installed with a plate or would I just want it mounted flat.  Any other things I need to know when I take the skis in to the shop for mounting?

 

All this is very new to me and I don't know any skiers, so thanks for any help.

post #2 of 6
Ahhh Madison~I love Madison. Went to school there: ) Cascade Mountain is kinda small tho lol~

Get good fitted boots first. Then skis. And the RTM 73 you are looking at come with system bondings so you don't have to get a separate pair. Actually most of skis under 85 mm width will come with system bindings so that's why separate narrow brake bindings are hard to find.
post #3 of 6

Getting out of the rental world is a very good aspiration.  Don't sweat too much about finding the "perfect" ski, just get something that will get you out on the hill.  Ski swaps abound this time of year and are a great way to get going on the cheap.

 

Standard advice here is to buy boots first - well fitting boots will make much much more difference than skis or bindings.  This has been discussed to death here so I won't repeat it now, but if you use the search box you should find out lots about how to procure a good pair of boots.

 

 

The RTM 73 should be fine - it's biased towards groomed terrain but is versatile enough that it will work adequately for anything you are likely to find in the midwest..

 

As for the bindings, why do you feel the need for high DIN?  As a beginner, you shouldn't need more than 8-10, even at your size.  And  if you are coming out of your bindings on blue groomers it's due to poor technique not from too low a DIN setting.  Take a lesson rather than cranking them up.

 

 

 

 

post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 

I was seeing the package binding spec up to a skier of 200 lbs.  So, figured bigger is better on DIN even if I am not cranking it up as a beginner.  I have never pulled out of a rental binding and have only released twice during falls.  But, I figured a binding that was compatible with a heavier dude made sense if this was a set of skis I'd keep for a while.  And they were only a hundred dollars - is there a drawback?  Thanks.

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by JPT1 View Post

I was seeing the package binding spec up to a skier of 200 lbs.  So, figured bigger is better on DIN even if I am not cranking it up as a beginner.  I have never pulled out of a rental binding and have only released twice during falls.  But, I figured a binding that was compatible with a heavier dude made sense if this was a set of skis I'd keep for a while.  And they were only a hundred dollars - is there a drawback?  Thanks.

Go to this site http://www.dinsetting.com and find your appropriate DIN setting. I'm 200 lb myself and a type 3 skier with boot sole length of 313. My recommended DIN setting is 8.5 and I normally don't run my DIN higher than 8 if I'm not doing big jumps. Running DIN too high is an excellent way to hurt yourself and end the season early.
post #6 of 6

Welcome to Epicski!

 

Have you heard of a season lease?  Given that you missed most of the early season sales, might be a good choice.  You can learn more and then buy with more confidence during late season sales.  Those might start right after Pres. Day weekend in the midwest.  That's what happens in the flatlands of the southeast.

 

I've always had my own boots as a adult even though when working I only skied a few days every few years.  Didn't bother even thinking about skis.  I rented off mountain most of the time.  When my daughter was old enough to get started at a local hill, I rented skis and her her equipment as a free rental when she was under age 6.  Then I bought a used ski with demo bindings for $100 and used those for a couple seasons.  We were only skiing 5-10 days each winter.  After that . . . got better boots, better skis, and started up the slippery slope towards a quiver.

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