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Too cold for the Hot Sauce?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I've been using Hot Sauce this season and have had great results.  Until this past week, where we have had -20F  weather and a new 14" dump.  The snow has been like skiing on styrofoam,  just dry,  tuff to skate, ski backwards, dry as hell.  What's the right wax? I'm not  running gates,  just rec skiing.  Thanks

post #2 of 16
Dominator Hyper-zoom with some blue wax mixed in.
post #3 of 16
Hertel makes Cold Snap, which is apparently a hardener that you blend with Hot Sauce. I have some, but haven't tried it yet, Here's the URL:
http://www.hertelskiwax.com/Cold-Snap-1-oz-p/coldsnap.htm
post #4 of 16

IMO Max Cap has the right recipe - graphite or moly-loaded low fluoro with a touch of super hard additive.

 

 

Hertel with hardener -might- be hard enough but won't be much help on the triboelectric front.

post #5 of 16

Also use a horse hair brush to reduce static on the cold snow. I read that in one of the tuning guides somewhere years ago.

 

Another thing I've learned over the years, when I wax my powder skis for the summer, I use a all temp wax instead of the yellow wax. I figured out I'm going to use them when its cold and not in the late Fall. Might as well have them ready to go.

 

Last Saturday night I scraped them sprinkled in a little Dominator HXO7 cold powder for the 15" of 0*F snow we got. Have the cold powder left over from years ago.

 

Skis were great on Sunday

post #6 of 16

Coldest I've skied was a solid high of -12F or so for a couple days. Hot Sauce did as well as anything else, maybe better, that trip. Can't say if it falls off or not when it is colder than that.

post #7 of 16

I ski the Hertel FC739 only because is lasts so long.  I don't know why it does, but it stays on for days.  Anyhow, I bought some KUU molybdenum temperature specific stuff a few years ago, and rub it on the ski before waxing with the Hertel in the cold and warm extreme temperatures. The combination works great in the super cold temps and helps a little bit in the melting temperatures. I have no experience with the Cold Snap, in fact I never knew he was selling it.

post #8 of 16
One reason the wax last so long for you is the possibility that you don't ski on man made snow.

When I ski out west my wax last all 6 or 7 day's. Back here, it's half that.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post

One reason the wax last so long for you is the possibility that you don't ski on man made snow.

When I ski out west my wax last all 6 or 7 day's. Back here, it's half that.

 

I spent most of the last two years on blown (man-made) or frozen-over spring snow. :hissyfit:   This year, unfortunately, is starting out with the carving skis.   

post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 

So Litterbug,  I bought me some of that Cold Snap stuff this week,  bout 5oz.    Figured Cold Snap was a good name for the weather  around here, so what the heck.     But today it warmed up to 27F.  So what  do I do now?   Mix'em?   50/50 like?   Or is there a better wax for this situation?   15 below one day, and then 27f three days later?  Thanks

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Hertel with hardener -might- be hard enough but won't be much help on the triboelectric front.
Could you explain why? I need to pick up the fine points.
post #12 of 16
Never ever buy or use super cold wax in New England. If you do it will rain.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by salmonsoup View Post

So Litterbug,  I bought me some of that Cold Snap stuff this week,  bout 5oz.    Figured Cold Snap was a good name for the weather  around here, so what the heck.     But today it warmed up to 27F.  So what  do I do now?   Mix'em?   50/50 like?   Or is there a better wax for this situation?   15 below one day, and then 27f three days later?  Thanks
Hertel's site says to mix them 50/50 by holding the wax bars together when you melt them.

I'm a little confused about how waxes interact when combined, but I'm pretty sure they don't necessarily average out like that. I've read something about picking up the properties of both but not losing the benefits, but I don't even know what that even means.

Hopefully a kindly waxing nerd will shed some light on it.rolleyes.gif
post #14 of 16
There is a lot on the Net about all of this, but here is an easy to read article: http://www.purgatoryskiteam.org/docs/Race_Place_Ski_Waxing.pdf

The electro static verbiage discussed above is just another type of friction that is worst at the colder temps. I would read an article or two, and then not worry about it. A decent all purpose wax protects the bases and in most situations makes the skis glide better. Using no wax is probably better than using the absolutely wrong wax, but if you are using an all purpose wax that outcome would be unlikely. So just use an all purpose wax and if you want to experiment with blending waxes at the extreme temperature ranges give it a try, and if not don't worry about it.
post #15 of 16
I just hadn't even thought of static electricity, but it's one of those "doh!" things: of course very cold snow would be dry, and friction between it and something like polyethylene would build up a charge. I wouldn't have thought it would have much of an effect, but all kinds of things I wouldn't expect do happen at extreme temperatures.
post #16 of 16

Littlerbug

 

I like to think of what happens between wax and the snow like this:

 

Total friction = dry friction + wet friction + electrostatic friction.

 

For high levels of dry friction you want to be waxing hard waxes -- or adding a hardner to what wax you have -- as this hardness helps to overcome the intense dry friction from cold snows.

 

For wet friction, use a wax with fluoro added to the wax. Fluorinated wax repels the sticky feeling from wet snow, but does not help if the snow is extra dry and can actually slow you down, so in this case of extra dry, ex-cold snow .... a non-fluorinated wax might do as well as a more expensive fluoro wax.

 

And yes, electrostatic friction is real and can cause your glide to lock-up at extreme cold temperatures and will cause your skis to attract dirt and pollen. For this, use a wax that is not only hard, but contains graphite, or another antistatic additive that conducts away the static build-up.

 

For more information go to www.dominatorwax.com

 

Happy Sliding!

 

Tom

 

 

 

 

 

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