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Question about Goggle Lens!

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

If I'm looking to get a new pair of goggles and don't plan on buying any extra lenses, is a polarized automatic lens the best?

What's your preference between Anon-style polarized automatic vs. Smith-style polarized red sensor lenses?

 

Thank you!

post #2 of 11
If your young, may be one lens will do.

Us old folks need a low light lens most of the season. In Spring I'll go with a polarized lens in my Smiths.

If you have blue eyes. the orange lens seem to work better for low light.
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Yes, I'm young and I have brown eyes so the light doesn't bother me as much.

Have you used any polarized automatic/photochromic lenses before?

post #4 of 11
Polarized lenses do not work very well in cold. That's why the companies released quick switch lenses system.
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaserPower View Post

Polarized lenses do not work very well in cold. That's why the companies released quick switch lenses system.

 

Polarized and photochromatic lenses are very different things.  You seem to be confusing the terms.

 

"Polarized" means the lens includes a linear polarizing element to reduce glare.  This makes the lens a bit 'darker' overall, but the glare reduction can be worth it sometimes.

 

"Photochromatic" lenses change tint from light to dark based on the amount of light hitting them.  Zeal and Smith (and probably some other manufacturers) offer photochromatic ski goggle lenses that are designed to work in cold weather.  I don't know how low a temperature they are rated for.  I have not used them personally.

 

There may be some lenses that are both polarized AND photochromatic, but they are two totally separate features.

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

Polarized and photochromatic lenses are very different things.  You seem to be confusing the terms.

"Polarized" means the lens includes a linear polarizing element to reduce glare.  This makes the lens a bit 'darker' overall, but the glare reduction can be worth it sometimes.

"Photochromatic" lenses change tint from light to dark based on the amount of light hitting them.  Zeal and Smith (and probably some other manufacturers) offer photochromatic ski goggle lenses that are designed to work in cold weather.  I don't know how low a temperature they are rated for.  I have not used them personally.

There may be some lenses that are both polarized AND photochromatic, but they are two totally separate features.

Woops I mean to say photochromic...typo typo lol. Those still has problems when temperature gets too cold.

Some say polarized lenses makes you unable to see ice since the glare of ice is gone. But I just found they make water and ice look weird because they polarized the lights in certain directions
post #7 of 11

I am not a fan of ether one. The Photo-chromatic properties do not change fast enough for the lens to be useful. If its a sunny day and I hit a shade spot I cant see at all. By the time I'm out of the trees they are too light. The polarized properties tend to reduce the glare that gives me the definition of the snow. I love polar for water, not for snow.      

post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVmike View Post
 

I am not a fan of ether one. The Photo-chromatic properties do not change fast enough for the lens to be useful. If its a sunny day and I hit a shade spot I cant see at all. By the time I'm out of the trees they are too light. The polarized properties tend to reduce the glare that gives me the definition of the snow. I love polar for water, not for snow.      

 

Agree, polarized is nowhere near as useful for snow/skiing as it is for water, and it adds significant cost. OP: lens tint is what you need to be concerned about, and the best answer depends on where you ski and how many lenses you are willing to pay for.

post #9 of 11

If you are just going to get one pair of goggles with one lens I would probably go with something like a Smith Ignitor--35% light transmission. The sensor lens doesn't block enough light for bright days. The Ignitor will make things look darker on cloudy/snowy days but you'll still be able to see just as well. IME the flat light lenses like Sensors don't make much of a difference in contrast on flat light days--they just make things look brighter.

post #10 of 11

I have been reading this thread and I think there is some misinformation here from people who have not used these lens. For 3 years I used a pair of Zeal SPX Polarized Photochromic goggles.  No, the photochromic does not change instantly.  When it is cold it might transition to its new state in 30 to 60 seconds.  That is pretty much true of any photochromic lens.  The polarized part of the lens is there all the time and does not transition.  If you go from light into shade while skiing, yes it will still take that amount of time to transition.  Still a lot faster than going back to the lodge to change goggles, or changing your lens (which I would not recommend doing while moving.  :cool)  I never found the lack of instant gratification to be a problem.

 

For anything but flat light, I thought it was a great goggle (but I am one of those old dudes).  I used another pair of goggles with a flat light lens for those times.  It was just fine on medium days, and worked spectacularly well on those really bright, glarey days. 

 

Zeal was the first, but there are several others who make a polarized photochromic lens too.  I don't see them in shops much though.  I tripped over mine in TJ Max (!!) and bought them at a 70 percent discount.  I would happily buy another pair again.

 

Surfdog

post #11 of 11

R553: It kind of depends on where you ski and if it's usually sunny or if you're usually skiing a lot in flat light and shadows. If I'm going someplace that's generally pretty sunny my photochromatic lens goggles are OK, but just be aware that they don't change tint quick enough to help when you come around a bend into shadows. If I'm someplace that's more of a flat light and shadows place I would take a bright lens goggle like a light rose or light yellow - but be careful of the light yellow as if it surprises you and gets really sunny I will sometimes get a headache. About the only lens that I've used which works pretty darn well in flat or low light, and still works OK in bright sun without getting a headache is the Smith Sensor Mirror lens. Gradient lenses could be a good multiple light instant response solution, but I unfortunately don't know of any... 

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