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Warranty on ski boots - Page 2

post #31 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by goranmilos View Post

Not sure how anybody can determine from faraway just by looking at one picture what caused the buckle to bend? And without looking at the buckle, how can anybody determine why that happened?

OP might or might not have warranty claim, that is between him and Head to discuss. I agree with Raysteng - it is between OP and Head to figure this out.

 



What part of skiing would cause the buckle to bend outwards? All force from the function of the buckle would be into and along the boot and would not cause it to bend outwards. The only to bend the buckle outwards would be for it to get caught on somethign or dropped on the buckle which would not qualify as a manufacture's defect.
post #32 of 45

Is the OP Red or Gray?

post #33 of 45
I have faith in humanity but lack forensic expertise and knowledge of physics.
I am sure that Head would make correct determination.
post #34 of 45
Thread Starter 
.
Edited by nochaser - 1/19/14 at 8:00pm
post #35 of 45
Thread Starter 
smile.gif I do also believe in humanity.
Edited by nochaser - 12/20/13 at 10:20am
post #36 of 45

Not insinuating this happened, but while spending 7 years in a Seattle ski shop, we'd often find a direct correlation between a bent buckle and the color of paint on the benches, door frames, cafeteria tables.  Typically it was the toe buckle.  Cause was unbuckling the buckles to relieve pressure when walking inside & they'd knock the buckle when walkng, sitting down, etc.  Based upon the picture, it's clear that something hit the buckle from the underside moving upward.  I'd check for nicks, scratches, paint transfer etc.  That may help provide clues into how it's happening.  Can't see in the pic perfectly, but it looks like the buckle was open and the long latch sticking out perpendicular to the side of the boot.  This provided a long lever arm to torsionally bend the base of the buckle.  I would start to think about how they were put in a boot bag, trunk of car, etc where the buckle wasn't fastened closed and in the process of 'setting them down' the buckle came in contact with something solid which pushed up on the buckle when it was sticking out.   Lots of ways it could have happened.

 

As for repair, a good shop should be able to repair in a couple of minutes.  It's either the rivet or the buckle that's bent.  If it's the rivet, then it'll be a simple drill out & replace the rivet.  If it's the buckle or both, then they should be able to order a new one & just replace it.  Cost was always nominal.  Since labor was less than 10min , we'd typically only charge for the buckle cost and often no charge unless they were a repeat offender.  In this case, I'd probably drill it out, bend it back with pliers & rivet it back on.  not a big deal.

post #37 of 45
Thread Starter 
I talked to the only authorized Head dealer in town. They said they never had to replace buckles, ever. I can see why the skepticism here.

They didn't make it sound like it was a big job, maybe be $20-30, but told me to come back on 1/20th as they are swamped now. He advised me to work with my store saying they should take care of it. My store told me to ship them to Head, so that's what I was gonna do. Back to square one.

I keep my boots in my bag at all times except when I dry them over night or when I have them on. I don't walk around with buckles hanging loose. I'm very particular and meticulous about what I really care about.

Having said that, pretty good points made there because it's possible that something happened without me knowing it, just like it's possible that this buckle is a defective in material or by design.
Edited by nochaser - 12/20/13 at 6:22pm
post #38 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

I talked to the only authorized Head dealer in town. They said they never had to replace buckles, ever. I can see why the skepticism here.



They didn't make it sound like it was a big job but told me to come back on 1/20th as they are swamped now. He advised me to work with my store saying they should take care of it. My store told me to ship them to Head, so that's what I was gonna do. Back to square one.



I keep my boots in my bag at all times except when I dry them over night or when I have them on. I don't walk around with buckles hanging loose. I'm very particular and meticulous about what I really care about.



Having said that, pretty good points made there because it's possible that something happened without me knowing it, just like it's possible that this buckle is a defective in material or by design.

 



The problem is there is noting in a buckle's function that could cause it to bend outward. All the force is going into the boot that's what makes it tighten the boot and your buckle is bent against the force it's exerting. I'm not saying your trying to game the system or anything, you seem to genuinely believe it was not your fault but the buckle simply could not have done that under designed use.

As far as a materials defect it is very uncommon for a metal to be more mallebable as a result of bad manufacturing. A bad manufacturing process almost always leads to the metal being extremly brittle which means the buckle would shatter rather than bend. Now it's not impossible for the metal to become more malleable than intended but very unlikely.


Edit: O just as another point. The double rivets are not to keep the buckle from bending upwards for reasons as explained above but to keep it from spinning. A single rivet would allow the buckle to pivot around it with sufficient force which can happen especially with the forces torquing down the boot. As such it doesn't really matter where the two rivets are on the buckle as long as there are two
post #39 of 45
Thread Starter 
I think it's from forward lean and just simply buckling up. Not during or after skiing. I have moved the latches farther away from the buckle. Then I go almost all the way - one notch below the tightest setting. It's always a great struggle to get those buckles tightened on both boots and I exert a great deal of force.

Regardless of the root cause, does everyone think I should not pay attention and just use them as is?

Anyone out there that owns Head Raptors that has had similar experience?
Edited by nochaser - 12/20/13 at 1:15pm
post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

I talked to the only authorized Head dealer in town. They said they never had to replace buckles, ever. I can see why the skepticism here.

They didn't make it sound like it was a big job but told me to come back on 1/20th as they are swamped now. He advised me to work with my store saying they should take care of it. My store told me to ship them to Head, so that's what I was gonna do. Back to square one.

I keep my boots in my bag at all times except when I dry them over night or when I have them on. I don't walk around with buckles hanging loose. I'm very particular and meticulous about what I really care about.

Having said that, pretty good points made there because it's possible that something happened without me knowing it, just like it's possible that this buckle is a defective in material or by design.

I've skied in the RS 130 for going on season 3 now. I know plenty of others who ski this boot and buckle design. The only flaw in the design is that the micro adjustment barrel can freeze in cold temps. The bend in your photo is not one generated by the forces of skiing. There's a reason the two rivets are where they are if you have some knowledge of force vectors. Again, this is for lack of kinder words, a moronically easy fix. You can most certainly ski your boot until the shop has a spot on their schedule to effect repair. I'm guessing when it's buckled, the 'bent' bit is pulled closely to the shell. I can't imagine the function of the boot in any way affected. Again, just ski until the shop is ready to see you. Until then, re-read post 36. It's spot on.
post #41 of 45

The slight bend has no adverse effect on the boot or your skiing. If the guys at the local shop said they can get a buckle in a few weeks, just wait. Go ski, whats the worst that could happen, it bends a little more? Still no effect on the boot or your skiing. On a side note. If the shop that you purchased the boots at is not a Head authorized dealer how did they get the boots? 

post #42 of 45
Thread Starter 
An auth. dealer but far out of town. That's probably why they didn't want to bother with it and referred me directly to the mfg.

I didn't even notice it until I was cleaning past weekend, so that makes sense.
post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

An auth. dealer but far out of town. That's probably why they didn't want to bother with it and referred me directly to the mfg.

I didn't even notice it until I was cleaning past weekend, so that makes sense.

Can't see clearly, but if you're maxing out your buckled, make sure the bale ladder is moved as far to the medial side of the boot as you can. There are a couple of holes pre drilled. You can add another if needs. They're very tough boots that can take a lot of 'adjustment'.
post #44 of 45
Thread Starter 
Good stuff. All the info and support makes me feel better.

Thanks for your input, everyone.
post #45 of 45
Thread Starter 
They use Philips screws for the buckles instead of rivets on the b3. Good stuff.
Edited by nochaser - 1/19/14 at 6:33pm
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