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Why is mogul skiing so difficult? - Page 10

post #271 of 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

 

 

well I agree with keep turning.

 

you do not need to learn to unweight anything to make short linked turn, but unweighting can help you pivot entry which in bumps is sometimes helpful while skiing terrain like you describe. You really should learn to  

carving big wide takes tons of energy and commitment. Most people carving turns on groomers are not actually bending the ski or making smaller arc than ski radius.

 

I do not think there are right and wrong ways to ski anywhere including bumps. Even Nail my only issue with him is that he thinks his way is the only way and really has no idea how to convey technique. He is skiing pretty efficiently and smooth though the bumps. 

 

If someone wants to get better at bumps the reality is they are going to ski tons of them and hopefully find someone who can help them, who truly understands what is going in with this sport. You are right they are not going to whine at all. 

??? I can, smart guy.  The topic is moguls, not short linked turns.  There's a place for everything, but you'd never know it reading about technique here or watching what so many poeple do.  The point is that there are so many out there that CAN'T unweight when needed, and WON'T commit. 

 

Yes, skiing tons of them is the key.  It won't be fun at first.  You seem to be a Stowe guy.  I'd take somebody down Chin Clip repeatedly on a warm day on spring corn.  The bumps are soft,

 and forgiving, it's not crazy steep and it discourages sweeping high speed carves.   The bumps provide positive encouragement to linking turns by whatever means.  Keep doing that and the rest will come.

post #272 of 285
Never thought I'd see such a matched set of posters...popcorn.gif It's uncanny.
post #273 of 285
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kletter1mann View Post
 

The point is that there are so many out there that CAN'T unweight when needed, and WON'T commit. 

 

Point well made. The sad story is that less and less skiers are taught proper up/down-unweighting technique. The new "tip and turn" generation maybe rip on a groomer with carving skis but sure enough cannot make a proper parallel turn in crud or ski bumps. And just for the record, short linked turns are based on unweighting. That is the reason why its always easier to link short turns than turning out of a traverse.

post #274 of 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
 

 

Point well made. The sad story is that less and less skiers are taught proper up/down-unweighting technique. The new "tip and turn" generation maybe rip on a groomer with carving skis but sure enough cannot make a proper parallel turn in crud or ski bumps. And just for the record, short linked turns are based on unweighting. That is the reason why its always easier to link short turns than turning out of a traverse.


Thank you.  Exactly.

post #275 of 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
 

 

I think the "commitment" issue is in here somewhere. However, if it was left out, thanks for mentioning. Yes, bump skiing is all about commitment but I like to think of it as skiing down the moguls in segments. Bursts of commitment. Three things matters: commitment, fitness and technique. By fitness I don't mean big muscles. I mean mogul fitness. Many claim if you have the right technique you don't get tired but usually these guys are very fit and ski all the time.

 

I don't quite agree with you on commitment being an requirement only for bump skiing. Its as important in ski racing and sometimes off-pist. In some ways every turn is a commitment. Even for a beginner wedging on the bunny hill. Pointing your ski tips into the fall line heading into the unknown takes a commitment at any level.

!@##$?!?!@#$!!  Not what I said.  Commitment is necessary for various kinds of skiing, moguls among them. 

 

Rock climbing offers many mental lessons for skiing.  Consider the case where you're on a high commitment route.  At the crux you need to throw a move that you aren't at all sure you're going to stick.  The fall will be heinous and there's no way to downclimb.  Now you're forcing yourself to do something outside your comfort zone by sheer force of will.  There's no easy, lazy way to do it.  For somebody that gets beaten up in the bumps, forcing themself to go charge down and turn-turn-turn feels about the same. 

post #276 of 285
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kletter1mann View Post
 

!@##$?!?!@#$!!  Not what I said.  Commitment is necessary for various kinds of skiing, moguls among them. 

 

Rock climbing offers many mental lessons for skiing.  Consider the case where you're on a high commitment route.  At the crux you need to throw a move that you aren't at all sure you're going to stick.  The fall will be heinous and there's no way to downclimb.  Now you're forcing yourself to do something outside your comfort zone by sheer force of will.  There's no easy, lazy way to do it.  For somebody that gets beaten up in the bumps, forcing themself to go charge down and turn-turn-turn feels about the same. 

 

Thumbs Up Thumbs Up Thumbs Up

post #277 of 285

I do not know the frozen bumps on the closed chin clip and the left side of perry today were by far the best skiing on the hill. 

 

 

Honestly I think doing it is great but practice makes permanent and sometime doing it the wrong way for a long time can lead to some really tough to break habits habits down the road. 

post #278 of 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

Point well made. The sad story is that less and less skiers are taught proper up/down-unweighting technique. The new "tip and turn" generation maybe rip on a groomer with carving skis but sure enough cannot make a proper parallel turn in crud or ski bumps. And just for the record, short linked turns are based on unweighting. That is the reason why its always easier to link short turns than turning out of a traverse.

I like to think of pressure management. Whatever is required to get the task done, be it skiing bumps or powder or some other snow surface. Your point is well made.
post #279 of 285

Hey, where's the date on this stuff?

post #280 of 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mogulking View Post
 

Hey, where's the date on this stuff?


top left corner of the post.  I think it's month/day/year

post #281 of 285
Or top right on Mobile
post #282 of 285


thanks

post #283 of 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
 

 

Point well made. The sad story is that less and less skiers are taught proper up/down-unweighting technique. The new "tip and turn" generation maybe rip on a groomer with carving skis but sure enough cannot make a proper parallel turn in crud or ski bumps. And just for the record, short linked turns are based on unweighting. That is the reason why its always easier to link short turns than turning out of a traverse.

 

Just like a good mix of carve and skid to match the terrain, a good mix of tip-n-turn with flexion and extension as called for by blended terrain has beckoned the versatility and adaptability as the holy grail of top technical freeskiers. This is why I believe we need and may start to see more tech freeskier demos on blended terrain. As soon as one can make it look perfect on flat groomers, it is time to move on and establish separation from the one-trick-pony skiers.

post #284 of 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mogulking View Post
 

Hey, where's the date on this stuff?


That's the best way to revive a thread ever! :D

post #285 of 285
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich666 View Post
 

 

Just like a good mix of carve and skid to match the terrain, a good mix of tip-n-turn with flexion and extension as called for by blended terrain has beckoned the versatility and adaptability as the holy grail of top technical freeskiers. This is why I believe we need and may start to see more tech freeskier demos on blended terrain. As soon as one can make it look perfect on flat groomers, it is time to move on and establish separation from the one-trick-pony skiers.

 

A good starting point would be to nail bumps and carving.

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