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2014 Blizzard Ski lineup overview and quick reviews

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

2014 Blizzard Ski Lineup: review and overviews

 

Here are the 2014 Blizzard ski lineup: brought to you by dawgcatching.com. Reviews are typically a contribution of “staff and friends”, limited to people who can ski well and have been on a lot of product. Also, not on a ski company's payroll!

 

My personal info: 36 y/o, 155lbs, 5 foot 9, ski 30-50 days a year.

 

Note: only skis that we have some time on are listed here.

 

In order of narrow to wide:

 

Blizzard R-Power 7.2 FS: 113/68/97, 17m radius in 174cm. New slight early rise tip version of the old Power series. Somewhat replaces the old GSR IQ frontside carver/Masters GS board. Plenty stiff.

 

Dawg's Take:: a top-end ski right out of the classic Blizzard power carver mould. If anything a touch more forgiving in the tail vs. the GSR. Incredible carver, really no speed limit, but plenty forgiving at speed. Wicked confidence. Initiates quite easily for such a strong skier. Thrilling ride: I am glad that Blizzard is still making high performance frontside skis like this. Tested in 174cm

 

Blizzard S800 Power Suspension IQ; the successor to the much-liked Supersonic IQ, but with a longer tur 120/71/104. I need to confirm the radius, but based on the specs, it has more shape than the listed 18m TR.

 

Dawg's take: This is the carver for lighter guys like me. The elimination of the Power system makes the ski a bit lighter on the snow and more nimble, but mostly, just allows the ski to give more energy back. A thrilling ski! This is is a fairly pure carver, but doesn't do poorly in bumps. I skied it in the 167cm, and ordered a pair for personal use based on the demo. I like the new early rise tip: it is a little more delayed to set up the turn, but as soon as you hit the ski with edge angle, the result is a roaring across the fall line. Feels like a 14m ski in terms of how it skis. I really, really liked this ski, and could make it an everyday carver. I skied in 167cm, but would like to try a 174cm. It would add stability and take some of fun out of turn exits, though.

 

 

 

Magnum 8.0 CA: no changes for 2014: carbon laminate layup, flipcore construction, 122/80/108

 

Dawg's take: Skied this a bunch the past spring. Great spring snow model: very floaty, good in bumps. Decent to good edge hold on firmer snow. Lacking metal, it definitely prefers softer snow in general. As a carver, it is OK, but lacks the heft and confidence of the beefer TI versions. Nice in bumps, good predictable feel into the trough. Forgiving tail. After skiing it a bunch, I think it is best for less than expert skiers, unless you are really light. Even at 155lbs, I found myself overpowering it.

 

Magnum 8.0ti: no changes for 2014: Titanium aminate layup, flipcore construction, 122/80/108

 

Dawg's take: more substantial than the 8.0CA ,as one would expect. A very good carver: quicker and more lively than the 8.5ti, and has much more bite at the top of the turn than the 8.0. Stability is quite a bit higher. Energy is superb on this model; it is hard to shake at any speed. I skied it in 172 and 179: preferred the 172, as it is quite a stiff ski. It is a ski that likes to go edge to edge, rather than flat, and has a damp, smooth, muscular feel to it. Flipcore is mostly noticeable at the top of the turn (less aggressive) and tail (more energy) than a traditional ski. It is a ski that likes to be skied hard, not to cruise. In bumps, a 172cm can seem short, but it does ski well. This ski seems a touch stiffer than the 8.5ti, which is why I prefer the latter. But, with that said, if you need a frontside ripper, and are a bigger guy, the 8.0ti is a great option.

 

Magnum 8.5ti: no changes for 2014: Titanium aminate layup, flipcore construction, 125/83/109

 

Dawg's Take: as there are no changes for 2014, this is an easy ski to review. One of my personal favorites for frontside use, it is also great in not too deep new snow, and an excellent bump ski. It skis with a fluid feel, very progressive flex and release, and is easy to both rip on groomers and blast crud with. I don't think it has the power of a true frontside carver: I skied it next to the Fire Arrow 84 EDT and the Fire Arrow definitely was the superior ski in terms of hard snow grip and power. The 85ti is more of a frontside biased all-mountain ride: it will give you 85% of the FA's hard snow ability, but be much better in junky snow, as well as bumps. Flex is medium stiff, but is mitigated by the Flipcore tip and tail, allowing the ski to ski softer at those points. Energy on this ski is very good; exiting the turn, it is a breeze to load up the 8.5ti. As a bump ski specifically, this one is pretty good! Just does what you think it will do, with no surprises. The tip rocker isn't enough to mess with you: if anything, it will enhance the flex of the tip into the trough. Off-piste, this is a nimble, powerful ski, and comes into it's own. Unflappable in junk especially given the short (174cm) length. So, although this isn't the last word in true groomer race-ski performance, it has a very wide range of ability and a great choice for the narrower ½ of a 2 ski Western quiver. Even more so if the skier in question would rather find himself off-piste on most any day, yet wants something far from boring on groomed snow.

 

AppleMark

12" of high-quality semi-pack snow, 8.5ti rips it apart

 

 

 

 

Brahma: new ski for 2014, basically a shrunken Bonafide. It has the flipcore profile of the bigger freeride skis, so more tip and tail rocker. It is quite stiff, more or less the same layup as the Bonafide. Also a different flex pattern than the 8.5ti. 125/88/110, 19m radius in 180cm.

 

Dawg's take: you could say this is a shrunken Bonafide, and wouldn't be far off the mark at all. This is a great choice for the skier looking for the profile of the Bushwacker, but something more substantial. It rolls at speed, really with no speed limit, and is quite quick and lively on groomers, although it is lacking in real power compared to more typically profiled sub 90mm skis. For me, it was really at home in off-piste conditions, at faster speed, more wide open terrain. I found it to be very nimble yet powerful. In tight spaces, such as bumps, I preferred the Mag 8.5ti, as I also did in bumps. It is also quite stout in the tail, so I think it may be better suited to heavier, rather than lighter, skiers; I found the tail to be exactly the same as on the Bonafide, which is stiff and less than forgiving for lighter skiers such as myself. If you like the Bonafide and want something similar but narrower, this one is a no-brainer.

 

AppleMark

 

Making quick work of classic Mary Jane bumps on the Brahma

 

Bushwacker: no real changes for 2014, except for a larger 187cm length offered. Claimed weight is a good 300g lighter than the Brahma. I will weigh one if I can remember, and post the actual weight. Dimensions also 125/88/110, 19m radius in 180cm. Differences from the Brahma: no metal, basically.

 

Dawg's take: This ski has been around for a couple of years, but the longer length is definitely welcome. It is a better choice for me personally in bumps and tight trees: lighter, more nimble, and most importantly, more forgiving. I think upper intermediates would be wise to start here in the Blizzard lineup. If you are skiing moderate crud and learning balance off-piste, as well as bumps, this is your ski; it is easy to initiate, won't allow you to get hung up on the tail too much, and is easy to finish a turn. Has a nice flowing rhythm when turning. If you are a bigger skier, or going to be skiing fast, in more wide open spaces, look at the Brahma. I prefer the Brahma for ripping at speed, and also on gromers at speed: it has more beef, and just as importantly, great edgehold, whereas the Bushwacker's edge grip on firm snow is decent, but not the same as a metal laminate ski. Also more energy out of the Brahma. Those looking for a playful, forgiving off-piste ski, and groomer cruiser should check out the Bushwacker. Our resident bump expert said that he prefers the Bushwacker over the Brahma; the tip and tail flex were more agreeable.

 

Bonafide: no changes for 2014: 133/98/116, 21m radius in 180cm. Metal laminate construction.

 

Dawg's take: one of the most popular skis the past couple of years, the Bonafide is a solid do-everything choice. For a lighter guy like me, it leans toward a GS feel all over the mountain: no speed limit, can rip anything, totally confident. Great at speed in crud: and excellent float in new snow: although having a wider ski might be nice, you can ski any depth of snow on this bad boy. It is a typical Austrian feel: heavy, damp, muscular. Turn entry and exit are quite easy. It is a solid groomer ski as well: very damp and stable, quite grippy, although it lacks the energy and groomer fun of something like a 98mm Hell n' Back. Feels more high speed cruiser than snappy wide stance carver. I get pushed around on this ski in bumps: the flex is pretty overpowering here, so I like to keep it as a more wide-open ski. Bigger guys will like it everywhere, provided the feel is what you are looking for. It is best at speed to really open it up; one of those skis that isn't a putterer, and definitely one of the most powerful and reliable big-mountain skis on the hill.

 

AppleMark

 

Deep snow on the Bonafide

 

Kabookie: similar to Bonafide, but w/o metal. Weight on my scale was 120g less for the pair. Blizzard markets this as “free mountain lite” which is a great description. A free mountain ski for us lighter skiers! 133/98/116, 21m radius in 180cm

 

Dawg's Take: this is perhaps my favorite ski in the entire Blizzard lineup. Not as burly as the Bonafide, certainly not quite as good at high speeds in rough snow, but a real performer in mixed snow conditions and in softer bumps. It feels more at home as a jack of all-trades under my feet, perhaps only exceptional in soft snow tree skiing, but more nimble than it's big brother, more forgiving, and easier to handle as an everyday, do-everything ski. I really like this in soft snow conditions: boy, if you know how to ski it, to get long and short, use your feet; this ski will arc around trees like a slalom carver. In soft bumps, it simply drops you from one bump to the next; super forgiving, and super fun: the tail has a sweet flex and release here. Float for me is a bit better than the Bonafide in softer snow, due to the softer tip, no doubt. In bumps, it is one of the best wider skis. There is a bit of a trade-off at really high speeds: it doesn't blast crud or smooth out terrain imperfections as well as the Bonafide, and doesn't have the groomer grip of the Bonafide, but I don't buy 98mm skis for groomer performance. I would rather be on the Bonafide above the treeline, skiing really fast, and rather on the Kabookie in the trees and in places where I have to turn on a dime. A superb choice for those skiers like me, who want a ski that is relatively powerful, but not overbearing, and tend to like many skis that are high end models but without tons of metal. This is in contrast to those skiers who say “I won't ski a ski w/o metal”; those skiers won't be happy with this ski; it is decidedly medium flex.

 

AppleMark

 

The surfing Kabookie in new snow

 

Peacemaker: new ski for 2014, marketed as a Free Mountain Twin. 134/104/124, 23m radius in 186cm. No metal, more tip and tail rise than the Free Mountain or FM Lite lineups.

 

Dawg's take: This is a really nice change of pace for Blizzard. A fun, loose, playful ski that still has solid stability. It can get a little loose at really high speeds, but if you live for turning, and bouncing from turn to turn (like the Kabookie tends to feel) then check it out. Very floaty, tends to do better in soft snow off-piste. Very confident on-edge in both off-piste conditions and on groomers: skis short, so size accordingly. I was on the 186cm, and wouldn't want a shorter ski for off-piste and skiing fast. Very playful. I don't ride switch or ski anything that would require a twin, so I am not the best reviewer from that standpoint, but as far as a big-mountain, playful over muscle ski, it is very good. I didn't get it into truly deep snow, just a few inches of crud, but it is capable, and I bet it rocks in deeper snow as well. Compared to the Cochise, it feels less “wide big mountain” and more “playful and deeper snow ski”.

 

AppleMark

 

Low Angle fast crud skiing on the Peacemaker

 

 

 

Cochise: unchanged for 2014: 134/108/123 in 185cm, 28.5m radius, 2 sheets of metal.

 

Dawg's take: plenty has been written about this ski, I have reviewed it extensively here and elsewhere, so it is tough to expand on what this ski is, I will instead more relate it to the others in Blizzard's growing lineup.

 

With that in mind, I place the Cochise squarely in the “big-mountain do-everything, top level freeride ski” category. This ski is unshakable at speed, rips rough snow, can handle bumps pretty well, is solid on groomers for a big ski, and has wicked edge grip. Best at speed, under relatively skilled feet. Alternately, it does well under old folks who can skid it around easily/heel push and ski it statically: I am sure this is a big reason for its overall popularity. Assuming you are a good skier though, is the ski to have your feet if you are going to be lapping up the off-piste vert all day, and have room to let it run. It isn't Blizzard's best pow ski: I leave that to the Peacemaker and Gunsmoke; both of which are softer, and have more tip and tail rocker (and thus float). The Cochise, while it can hold it's own in pow, isn't a powder ski in the typical sense. It is an all-day soft snow resort ski for stronger skiers, and does the job admirably. It is also amped up a bit compared to the Scout: if the level of this ski is a 9-10, the Scout is an 8.5 to 9.5, but with more forgiving flex and a better tight space ski w/more energy. Really, those 2 could be close to interchangeable; which you prefer would likely come to down to ski feel preference and skier size. If you are looking for a big-mountain gorilla that can tackle anything and has no top end, but is as forgiving as anything if this performance caliber, you should check out the Cochise.

 

AppleMark

 

AppleMark

 

Big Snow Day on the Cochise

 

Scout: same profile as the Cochise, but with less metal. It definitely has metal underfoot (drilling it for bindings makes that obvious) and perhaps one sheet tip to tail? Not a huge weight savings over the Cochise, but a bit lighter in flex and more suitable to many skiers. 134/108/123 in 185cm, 28.5m radius, 2 sheets of metal.

 

Dawg's take: this is a great ski that nobody is talking about. Shame! It is a bit softer, bit friendlier version of the Cochise: perfect for guys like me who don't mind a bit softer ski. It is also perfect for those seeking a bit floatier, bit more playful version of the Cochise. Overall, it is very similar; the main difference for me come with a bit softer tip and tail (seems a bit floatier overall) and some added quickness in terms of tip engagement. A very surfy ski, with no speed limit, not in a 185cm at least. Great in wind-pack and dense crud, the conditions we often see at Bachelor. It is still a lot of ski in this length, just a bit more forgiving in the tail and playful when you are bouncing from one turn to the next. Still at home at speed: one of the strongest skis in this segment; the snow feels is more typical of a carbon-laminate ski like a Nordica, vs a titanium laminate ski such as the Cochise. One of my favorite off-piste, soft snow skis. Designed as a backcountry, descent oriented board, it probably is going to be as strong as anything on the market designated as such. Not sure why it hasn't gained much traction; it deserves to be in the conversation for a soft-snow oriented big mountain ski.

 

AppleMark

The Scout in action on Mary Jane

 

AppleMark

 

The Scout making quick work of a deep snow day

 

Bodacious; no changes for 2014: 140/118/130, 32m radius in 186cm. Very stiff, 2 sheets of metal with flipcore construction.

 

Dawg's take: This is a pretty strong ski, to say the least. I don't know too many people who can really push it hard enough to bring it alive. I have skied it in 186cm only, and it is ridiculously stable for such a big ski, but can feel a bit tank-like in tight spaces. Seems like you need the pitch, the speed, and the room to let it run in order for the Bodacious to be in it's element. Once at speed, there is nothing more sublime than a 50mph+ run down some steep, surfy snow pitch on this ski (we only have 1 pitch like that at Bachelor, bummer). It really needs some room though. Perhaps bigger guys would be more at home than I on this ski; it really won't flex under my weight. The same skiing characteristics that apply to the other Blizzard Flipcore skis also apply here; great tracking up front without a diving tip, very precise on edge, powerful release, stable and muscular.

 


Edited by dawgcatching - 1/8/14 at 8:27pm
post #2 of 15
Thread Starter 

Feel free to add comments/questions/follow-ups, and your own experiences! 

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

After skiing the Kabookie a bunch, it continues to impress with it's versatility.  Definitely not the only ski I would want in my quiver, but a superb softer snow off-piste, do-everything tool.  One of the best skis for that use that I have yet to be on. 

post #4 of 15

Great reviews!

post #5 of 15

^^^^ Amen. Dawg, at the Blizzard website, it seems as if a slew of their carvers now have some type of "power" binding, meaning a Marker piston mid-ski. Do you sense that the difference has become the setup of the piston, rather than presence or absence? That could produce an interesting ski, with some dampening from the piston without the beefiness produced by the whole enchilada. 

 

Also curious how you would compare the Scout to another strong ski you like, the BMX108. 

post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

^^^^ Amen. Dawg, at the Blizzard website, it seems as if a slew of their carvers now have some type of "power" binding, meaning a Marker piston mid-ski. Do you sense that the difference has become the setup of the piston, rather than presence or absence? That could produce an interesting ski, with some dampening from the piston without the beefiness produced by the whole enchilada. 

 

Also curious how you would compare the Scout to another strong ski you like, the BMX108. 

 

Good question. The only skis I tried with that unit were the R-Power (which has the full length power carbon reinforcement) and S-power (which has the standard piston binding).  Everything else was mounted with a Griffon demo, standard riser style binding.  

 

Scout vs BMX108: no question that the snow feel is completely different.  Scout is light, lively.  108 is smooth, damp, very stable. I would say the 108 has the edge in stability, the Scout has the edge in tip float. I would rather be on the 108 in chop snow and rough snow at big speed, and take the Scout in more typical backcountry conditions: uncut snow.  On groomers, the 108 has a big TR and doesn't come around quickly; the Scout is a little more nimble and quicker.  Flex and forgiveness are similar on both.  

 

I would lean toward owning a BMX108 for all-around resort conditions, and the Scout would get the nod on a big-snow day.  Both are insanely stable: I can't imagine wanting/needing more ski.     

post #7 of 15

Great review Dawg. I am a big fan of the entire Blizzard lineup and have a few in my quiver. I ski mainly on the east coast and have been looking at a frontside carver. I was a really big fan of the Supersonic but was considering S800. I am curious on your thoughts on both. I have skied a few of the M Power skis but not a big fan and liked the weight and liveliness of the non power version better. I also am a little concerned with the early rise tip vs. the no rise in the Supersonic. Also if you have any other frontside carvers in mind that compare to the Supersonic I am open to trying as well. Any insight is much appreciated. 

post #8 of 15

Dawg Q for ya. First off great reviews!!  

 

     I also Love the bones!! Im 225 and skied the 173cm bonified and was blown away buy the do it all and at speed of ski this short!!

 

   My real Q is for my daughter. shes an ex Fis Racer. Ski Instructor now.She has insane angulation on groomed, She skis her Atomic race stocks on firm days and her Blizzard Crush 132/98/110ish in a 163 on softer days. We feel her skis are to far right and left in the quiver and feel a 85-90 something might be a good compromise for teaching and leveling up without a ski change on most days. Shes 150lb and a very POWERFUL skier with perfect form. She needs to get better in the bumps and heavy chop though and was looking at the Brahma or the 85Ti. The two skis she has are polar opposites and none to great at these conditions. The crush are manageable but to level up she needs a little more power in a ski and less girth than the Crush and more than the 66 at the foot Race Stocks that are like super stiff. The girl skis shes tried are little under powered for her. Im leaning toward the 85ti based on her race background and 130flex boot she wears. Between these two what would be your recommendation having skied them all? 166 brahma or 85ti? Shes 5ft 2ich very strong and athletic!! :] Thanks

post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NESkiBum View Post
 

Great review Dawg. I am a big fan of the entire Blizzard lineup and have a few in my quiver. I ski mainly on the east coast and have been looking at a frontside carver. I was a really big fan of the Supersonic but was considering S800. I am curious on your thoughts on both. I have skied a few of the M Power skis but not a big fan and liked the weight and liveliness of the non power version better. I also am a little concerned with the early rise tip vs. the no rise in the Supersonic. Also if you have any other frontside carvers in mind that compare to the Supersonic I am open to trying as well. Any insight is much appreciated. 

 

I haven't skied the S800 on bulletproof snow yet, probably will do so next week when the next freeze/thaw cycle sets in.  In softer snow, I didn't notice an issue. Tip felt more or less like any other ski.   The early rise is pretty minimal; hard to say if it will detract from the edge engagement or not.  The Fire Arrow has a similar profile, and it is OK.  The Supersonic was more of a carver than this will be: TR was smaller with a bigger sidecut.  The S800 is more of a mid turn, mid flex carver.  Hard to describe; it feels lively like an SL in the tail, but has more of a GS turn radius, not unlike a Stockli SX.  Very smooth, yet snappy.

 

If you want a really turny carver like the Supersonic, the Elan Waveflex SLX is a great choice, or the newer Amphibio SLX: perhaps a bit more ski than the Supersonic. Maybe the Waveflex 14 slots in there as well; technically all-mountain, but very frontside oriented.   Head Magnum or Rally are also good in that category.  The Supersonic was always a good carver that did have a bit of a speed limit. It wasn't quite as solid at speed as, say the old GSR IQ, but very responsive, just a fun ski that ripped all over the hill.   Of course, the Stockli lineup (SX and CX) also are great.  The Kastle RX12 is a sweet ski, but maybe a bit more damp and stable than the Supersonic. 

 

I will report back once I get more time on the S800.  Due to the early rise, it can feel a touch shorter, so I am sticking with 174cm.  

post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whipper View Post
 

Dawg Q for ya. First off great reviews!!  

 

     I also Love the bones!! Im 225 and skied the 173cm bonified and was blown away buy the do it all and at speed of ski this short!!

 

   My real Q is for my daughter. shes an ex Fis Racer. Ski Instructor now.She has insane angulation on groomed, She skis her Atomic race stocks on firm days and her Blizzard Crush 132/98/110ish in a 163 on softer days. We feel her skis are to far right and left in the quiver and feel a 85-90 something might be a good compromise for teaching and leveling up without a ski change on most days. Shes 150lb and a very POWERFUL skier with perfect form. She needs to get better in the bumps and heavy chop though and was looking at the Brahma or the 85Ti. The two skis she has are polar opposites and none to great at these conditions. The crush are manageable but to level up she needs a little more power in a ski and less girth than the Crush and more than the 66 at the foot Race Stocks that are like super stiff. The girl skis shes tried are little under powered for her. Im leaning toward the 85ti based on her race background and 130flex boot she wears. Between these two what would be your recommendation having skied them all? 166 brahma or 85ti? Shes 5ft 2ich very strong and athletic!! :] Thanks

 

Hi,

 

First off, the Brahma is basically a narrower Bonafide.  

 

If she is teaching, I would recommend the 8.5ti.  Much better groomer ski than the Brahma (skis w/more contact area and more power), better in bumps, feels more nimble.  Seems like the more frontside and teaching oriented ride. The Brahma skis short on the groomers: fun, but it can feel like a 165cm when on the 180cm, and have an "always turning" feel to it.  Once off-piste though, especially in crud at speed, the Brahma really comes alive. It has a stiffer feeling tip for some reason than the 8.5ti, and totally blasts crud at speed. Great western off-piste weapon.  With that said, the 8.5ti is no slouch either in the crud.  Not as stable, but super nimble, and fun in it's own way.   I am 5 foot 9, and ski the 174cm 8.5ti, and 180cm Brahma.  They feel relatively equivalent in length.

 

To sum up the 2 skis: 8.5ti is a fairly frontside oriented ski, very nimble,  that is more versatile than most competitors as a do-everything ski.  Tip really enhances crud performance.  The Brahma is a more off-piste oriented ski, more stable blasting crud, that is also still quite good on groomers and bumps, due to still having a pretty active sidecut and tons of grip.  

post #11 of 15

Thanks dawg!!

 

   Going to see if I can get her out on a 8.5ti and see what she thinks then. Shes not a crud buster like me,I love maching crud at speed with as few turns as possible. she needs to just get better in bumps to level up type ski. After she levels up ill get her a Bonified for soft days just free sking and then maybe she will venture into the crud blasting ranks. Im sold on the Blizzards. Just a great sturdy ski. I wish there was someone in town with Stokl also. That stormrider series looks good also this year. The 95 or 100 sounds sweet!!

 

     thanks again for your input and great reading. James

post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whipper View Post
 

Thanks dawg!!

 

   Going to see if I can get her out on a 8.5ti and see what she thinks then. Shes not a crud buster like me,I love maching crud at speed with as few turns as possible. she needs to just get better in bumps to level up type ski. After she levels up ill get her a Bonified for soft days just free sking and then maybe she will venture into the crud blasting ranks. Im sold on the Blizzards. Just a great sturdy ski. I wish there was someone in town with Stokl also. That stormrider series looks good also this year. The 95 or 100 sounds sweet!!

 

     thanks again for your input and great reading. James

 

Let us know how it goes!  Stocklis are sweet too, some of my favorite skis.  I wish I had a pair!  Depending on her height, she may want to check out the Samba/Kabookie (more or less the same ski) as well. I am the same height, and ski the Kabookie in softer snow days. It is the Bonafide but without as much metal, and skis quite a bit differently.  I just got a Kabookie and put an Adrenalin 13 AT binding on it, which is a nice versatile setup for AT or resort use.  Last year I had the Kabookie with an alpine binding, and it was a great tree and soft snow ski. 

post #13 of 15
Dawg,
Have you spent any time on a sick day 95? I know how much you love the Kabookie and I have just spent a couple days on one after realizing the bonafide is just a little heavy after awhile. The only other ski I just haven't spent enough time on is the soul7. Wondering how your opinions on the soul 7 and the sick day compare to mine before I pull the trigger on a kabookie. Looking for a ski to sit in between my 177cm older Kendo and my current akjj and smaller 185jj. My kids steal my 185jj quite a bit so next year I think I might just replace the akjj and smaller JJ with a super 7. So if you had a Kendo and a super 7 or akjj what would you throw in the middle for a one ski quiver for trips or when the freshies are all gone and skiing leftovers for days? Soul 7, Kabookie, Sick day 95, Hell and back?? I like your reviews along with Blister gears so just looking for advice from guys that ski a ton of gear. Demoing is great but nothing like spending several different days on a pair of skis. First day on kabookie I really was wanting the bonafide back, and second day I adjusted to it and loved it. Just as an example.
post #14 of 15

Hi Dawg, and many thanks.These Blizzard skis are sounding very impressive. I like the fact the seem to have metal and no metal variants of the same ski so I am looking fwd to trying some.

 

 

A quick question, the Brahmas seem very similar to the MX88, how do they compare? (is the mx88 still the daddy in the c.86-90 width).

 

Many thanks

post #15 of 15

2014-2015

 

XPower 810 Ti

and

SRC Racing Suspension:

 

Simply stunning carving machines.

810 Ti for medium-large radius arcs of any pressure you can dish up...elegantly powerful and secure with composure at high speeds...addicting.

SRC for richochet-rabbit slalom turns of unlimited acceleration and response with laser-like grip into hard surfaces

 

I am using these two skis as reference standards this season for GS and SL racecarving tools. Great work Blizzard.

 

Quickie Impressions:

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/125120/couple-of-runs-2014-2015-blizzard-x-power-810-ti-and-src-racing-suspension

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › 2014 Blizzard Ski lineup overview and quick reviews