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Praxis Protest 187

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Skier: almost 50

Height: 6

Weight 168-170

BSL: 306

Days on the snow: 40 or so

Flex: stock, Medium-Plus  

Layup: carbon

 

Skied at Steamboat in 12-16" of blower, open runs, trees, broken untracked piled. 

 

2014 187 Protests actual tip to tail is 185.5, weight was just about 2100grms per ski

Mount point "line" (note change from past season)  

Dimensions (mm): 139-128-132

Turn Radius: 30 meters

Who is this ski for? anyone who skis powder and broken, a tree skiers tool for sure. 

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/praxis-protest/3

 

I put the link over to Blister as they pretty much nailed it and have more time on the protest. If you are not looking for a dedicated powder board, this is not your ski.

 

My impressions.  

 

Summary: (that's really what you want anyway) this is simply the finest powder ski I have ever had the pleasure of skiing.  A ski that is not simply only for powder but will reward the right technique on groomers. Not that this is for groomers, nor am I advocating you buy it for anything other than a powder ski (although i am sure others are using this ski for any powder that falls..)

 

The Protest is a different ski, it can feel like a reverse/reverse or more traditional and wants to be skied balanced and centered.  Because of the design, it will take a few runs to "get" the ski. Once you do, you will find it to be a remarkably nimble and precise ski in the trees and ski it on open, broken snow and you will find it will simply destroy any piles and smooth out the terrain. I can guarantee you will ski faster and more confidently in this kind of snow. 

 

 

The details:

I'm not an engineer and I am not as eloquent and many reviewers here but here's my take on this gem. Praxis has some tricks up their sleeves and it shows. Although dims and TR may make some raise an eyebrow, I can assure this 128mm wide ski will slink and maneuver with ease and accuracy. it is stable and confidence inspiring. It can be charged or skied carefully. One of the first thing you notice about the design of the ski is how the tip dims and tail dims are narrower than most powder skis despite its 128 underfoot. then you notice Praxis moved the widest part of the ski down the shovel about a foot in front of the toe this is what I think gives it the feel of a reverse/reverse on the snow. There is some sidecut and even some camber. The tip and tail splay are modest for a ski of this class, the first few inches of the tips and tails are very soft but quickly but progressively turn rather stiff but the overall pattern is a very compliant flex.  Hmm, this is not your typical floppy hugely splayed powder ski; but its also not a uber stiff cruise missile.  

 

On my first run in at least a foot I got off the Gondi and headed down to the Storm Peak lift. there is a nicely pitched blue run that gave me my first taste of this ski. I was amazed how well you could get this on edge and rip big GS turns. I could feel the stiffness of the ski underfoot and the tips held and tracked. I was flying and already skiing faster than before in this much powder. The ski just ripped through like a soft groomer. Hmm, this is 128???  You would never know it. I moved fore/aft to get the feel of the ski, I could tell it like to be skied centered, from there, you had total control of the ski and could feel the tips/underfoot and tail through the turn. 

 

Up on the mountain I headed down a black run with some piled snow from the previous cycle now covered with the new foot plus. The Praxis turned into a different ski; it simply destroyed the soft piles and I was skiing it with total confidence, I stayed centered but could modulate the tips by pressing with my toes through the troughs. I found myself flying again. The ski tips will sink but don't get bogged down or deflected, you could make tight quick turns at will too. 

 

Next i headed into some Aspens  that were untracked, the Protest morphed again, this time skiing very well at slow speed. I entered the line upright and stacked with skis flat, from here, you could literally turn the skis by simply slightly weight shifting and using the toes to lightly press down and unweight the ski. It turned on a dime with such little input and I slinked my way through making nice even smooth turns. I headed to some steeper tight evergreens next that were wind loaded and still holding from the last storm, these are trees where you need to make a lot of quick pivoting turns; the Protests literally spun 180* at will. If you keep the body in the fall line and release the downhill edge, they just spin. Wow.....  this line was knee deep.

 

Bumps, Here's where I was blown away; on soft piled bumped out snow the Protest rock. Not just survivable but down right good.  No kidding and I am not the best bump skier. 

 

In summary,, read from the beginning!  Thanks Keith!!!


Edited by Finndog - 12/13/13 at 3:36am
post #2 of 18

good example where buying with no demo time might work if you have the right information! Looks like you haven't found the tips to be super soft or not in the right stiffness compared to underfoot like some of the comments on tgr...

 

great you are having a great time on them!

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

actually i found the tips were perfectly in conjunction with the stiffer mid body of the ski. It absorbs and planes up so you get the effect of a larger splay when needed.  

post #4 of 18

What kind of layup was the ski - carbon/fiber or standard? what about flex - standard or custom?

 

Speaking of the ski's performance - would you call it a good tool for heliskiing or more of an inbounds ski-it-all soft snow ski?

 

Finally, how does the ski handles the wide open bowls with deep powder? isn't the design conducive to making short turns only?

post #5 of 18

What was your previous deep snow ski? (i.e. what are you comparing it to?)

post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by IvanL View Post
 

What kind of layup was the ski - carbon/fiber or standard? what about flex - standard or custom?

 

Speaking of the ski's performance - would you call it a good tool for heliskiing or more of an inbounds ski-it-all soft snow ski?

 

Finally, how does the ski handles the wide open bowls with deep powder? isn't the design conducive to making short turns only?

 

Since Finndog has not jumped in yet, I will :) First thing is that I think Finndog's review was very on target. Including his observations about how it seems to like to be skied.

 

I've skied the Protest in both glass and carbon. I like both. From my point of view, both are great. My take is that the glass is bit more damp and smooth. The carbon a bit poppier and lighter. If I were getting one for generic alpine use, I’d personally get glass. If I were getting one to skin, I’d get carbon. In the conditions where I like the ski best, I’m not so sure the pop comes into play much with this ski. Others may well disagree...

 

I have used the Protest dozens of days, both inbounds and heli. It is great for both IMO. If I can only travel with one pair for a heli trip - this is it. If I expect to be able to ski powder inbounds, the protest is usually on the menu. It has the characteristic that it skis soft snow almost in the zone of a reverse/reverse powder ski. But it has enough edge to get you by on less than ideal snow - up to and including a couple thousand feet of inopportune ice glazed rain runnels (do not read this as implying I am a great skier - I’m emphatically not - it is more of an example of a less than ideal heli run in coastal BC where I was glad the Protests were on my feet vs my also beloved reverse/reverse Powder Boards). While that is not typical for a heli trip, wind scrubbed ridges and landing zones seem common enough…sort of like dealing with groomer returns on inbounds powder days. The Protest more than meets my needs in this regard.

 

In deep snow, slush, corn, etc., the design allows a “variable” turn radius. You can lay out very “wide”  surfy turns in bowls, on glacier runs, etc. In tight spots, you can pivot turns insanely fast. If you care, you can find some videos I posted from Stevens Pass and from Iceland. About 2/3 of the Stevens runs were on Protests. All my Iceland runs were. You can also google for much more impressive runs on the ski by Drew Tabke.

 

I also posted a bunch of “family album” shots of Protests in action in Finndog’s other thread.

 

 

post #7 of 18

Thanks, spin! Can't care less what Drew does on a ski, I believe it is  always much more informative to watch mere mortals skiing.

 

My previous experience with this kind of ski was on a Lotus 138 on a less than perfect day. I felt like the ski is honestly too big for my needs. I don't ski the way it should be skied. So I am seriously considering the Protests now as they look and ski like a r/r but at the same time aren;t huge planks.

post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 

2 good piece of info missing, 

 

Flex is stock "medium plus" this is really comparable to the overall flex of a BentChetler but has a completely different flex pattern. 

 

Layup is the carbon.  Very light feeling but has a nice dampness to it; certainly not dead but a nice lively calm feeling with great feedback

 

Open bowls; I have to say Spin nailed it. This ski loves broken snow as much as it loves fresh. I skied it several larger, open runs. It transitions from turn to turn so smoothly and easily making broken foot plus feel more like fresh, I am not exaggerating. 

post #9 of 18

Thanks, Finndog!

I was more referring to the open untracked - won't this ski lock you into the shorter turns? But, I guess it won't and is capable of longer turns in deep untracked stuff as well.

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 

no, will not lock into any turn shape, can be broken off at will.  

post #11 of 18

My last question - you mentioned that this ski is the finest powder ski you have skied. what other powder specific skis have you tried?

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 

dps 112

 

bentchetler

 

Unleashed Hell

 

S7's (previous version)

 

K2 Hellbent

 

 

 

Trying to think of others....

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

dps 112

 

bentchetler

 

Unleashed Hell

 

S7's (previous version)

 

K2 Hellbent

 

 

 

Trying to think of others....

So, the Protest is the most powder oriented ski of all the skis listed by design. Still makes me drool and really think of getting a pair.

post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 

well, I would say they are the most but I would say that each of the other are marketed as powder skis for the most part. Especially the DPS (resort powder) HellBent, Bentchetler, S7 and to a greater degree the Patron/unleashed.  

 

All that I can say is that I can't wait to get back on them :D

post #15 of 18

Finn, how's your quiver looking like after you got the Protest? I'm assuming nothing else wider than 120s, but wondering where the rest falls into... also what kinda of fresh snow are you grabbing the Protest to ski, just storm like weeks or anything less deep as well?

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

dps 112

 

bentchetler

 

Unleashed Hell

 

S7's (previous version)

 

K2 Hellbent

 

 

 

Trying to think of others....

I'd agree that most of those are pretty powder oriented - especially Hellbent (which could be arguably more pow oriented that Protest given softer flex means they're not great in anything tracked, although may be better on groomers... so different kinds of versatility..).

 

Anyway, I'm currently on DPS 112 hybrids in 190 (I'm 200lbs, 6'4, level 8, moderately aggressive skier) and really like their playfulness and versatility but looking for a more powder specialised tool.

 

Finndog can you elaborate on what you like most about the Protest over 112s?

 

I'm looking for something that's more floaty and slarvable in the deep whilst being more able to charge tracked soft snow conditions (I know these are generally a trade off but sounds like the Protest might do it but at the expense of groomer performance which I'm fine with). I'd be probably be 50:50 Backcountry:In-bounds pow ski in combination of deep Niseko trees and big alpine terrain in Gulmarg, India.

 

Also, has anyone skied latest Protest and also L138 spoon? Read a few comparisons of older versions but interested in how the latest updates might change things..

post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post
 

Finn, how's your quiver looking like after you got the Protest? I'm assuming nothing else wider than 120s, but wondering where the rest falls into... also what kinda of fresh snow are you grabbing the Protest to ski, just storm like weeks or anything less deep as well?

 

Sorry I didn't catch this before.  -  OK, so trying to remember since my season got cut so short.  I ended up with Soul 7's as my go to powder ski. Believe it or not, its a great ski for tighter trees in light snow. In fact, it is just a blast. It red-lines once the snow gets tracked though. For up here I can ski it for several hours in the trees and its great.  The protests are still in the quiver though as they are so much fun for deep days and its solid on broken snow. You know on a deep day after its still soft but really broken and churned?  That's where the protest makes those piles smooth and easy. Now, once it gets pushed up into firmer bumps, I would rather have something narrower.   I also picked up a pair of Kastle BMX 118's for kicks at the end of the season for charging on those piles but never got to ski them. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinski View Post
 

I'd agree that most of those are pretty powder oriented - especially Hellbent (which could be arguably more pow oriented that Protest given softer flex means they're not great in anything tracked, although may be better on groomers... so different kinds of versatility..).

 

Anyway, I'm currently on DPS 112 hybrids in 190 (I'm 200lbs, 6'4, level 8, moderately aggressive skier) and really like their playfulness and versatility but looking for a more powder specialised tool.

 

Finndog can you elaborate on what you like most about the Protest over 112s?

 

I'm looking for something that's more floaty and slarvable in the deep whilst being more able to charge tracked soft snow conditions (I know these are generally a trade off but sounds like the Protest might do it but at the expense of groomer performance which I'm fine with). I'd be probably be 50:50 Backcountry:In-bounds pow ski in combination of deep Niseko trees and big alpine terrain in Gulmarg, India.

 

Also, has anyone skied latest Protest and also L138 spoon? Read a few comparisons of older versions but interested in how the latest updates might change things..

 

Vin, far be it from me to recommend a ski for you!  But my take is that the 112 and protest are 2 very different ski's.  I like the 112, don't get me wrong. Its a great ski. I think for deeper days skiing over bottomless, the protest is just so much fun, easy and quicker (meaning less input required in the trees); once it gets tracked but still soft and not formed into bumps (wider, open bumps are fine but not troughed trees) the Protest is still easier to ski and far less deflected than the 112.  The 112 gets knocked around too easily on the broken deeper stuff.  On the other foot, the 112 is fun, nimble and quick in the trees and as long as its not heavy or too piled, the 112 is simply a fantastic ski and a fine groomer ski too (for skiing on powder days; not meant as a dedicated front-sider) .  In the balance of things I still think the Patron/unleashed is better with the nod to the 112 in deeper powder.) I ski enough powder 

 days that I can be really picky and have a couple different skis for different powder days so take that into consideration. If I did't ski here the 112 would be a fantastic choice as would a Patron/unleashed.  

 

For those who think the Protest is just a fat heavily rockered ski need to take a closer look. It actually has a very conservative amount of tail rocker and a long but low profile on the tip., Theres so much more going on with this ski than just rocker and width (128)  It skis so easily and effortlessly .  

 

For deep days however, the Protest is really hard to beat. Even on open groomed, it turns more than adequately.

post #18 of 18
Thanks Finn. I really like the 112 too and completely agree with your thoughts on their strengths & weaknesses. And that they're clearly a ski with a different purpose to the Protests. From your review, the Blister one & a few on TGR it seems like they fit what I'm after really well; 1. More deep snow float and slarvability 2. More stability to charge mixed/broken/tracked 3D snow.

Given my days on this will be Niseko or Gulmarg which each receives ave 600" snow per season a more specialised tool makes sense!

Yes, the subtle design details re: shape, rocker profiles & flex from reviews really appeals.

Weighing up 187 v 196 and med v med/stiff..
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