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Helping Boots and Gloves KEEP Feet and Hands WARM

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

Still in hot pursuit for warm feet and hands, let's sart with feet:

Assuming Warm Core, Warm Boots beforehand, and proper socks, any experience with these suggestions?  Me, probably combine all the above to make sure....  Not spending $300 on Hotronics.

 

1.  Mylar over liners?

2.  VBL socks?

3.  Chemical warmers?

4.  Loose buckling?

5.  Boot Gloves?

6.  Anti-perspirant and Baby Powder?

DIY: Insulating your ski boots,
no more cold feet while skiing!

Brought to you by Joakim Magnus Taraldsen, Norway 22/01-2004

skiboot_web.jpg

Going skiing, temperature: -14 degrees Celsius (7 degrees Fahrenheit).
After a half hour the toes start getting cold. After another half hour
we go inside to warm up our feet. Salesman in skishop will gladly
sell us some USD 150 battery operated ski boot heaters.


What to do now? Answer: Fix cold feet problem by insulating the
ski boots with heat-reflecting foil using USD 2 worth of materials.
Time spent: approx. 1 hour. Satisfaction: very high.

What you need:

Some packing tape and scissors.
A sheet of heat reflective foil ("Mylar emergency blanket" and
"Space blanket" are some common names for it, he who Googleth, findeth).

How to do it:

Remove the inner boots/linings from your ski boots.

Cut a 30cm strip of the blanket so that it covers the area starting over the toebox,
going under the sole and up a bit on the rear of your inner boots.

Fold the strip double and apply using the packing tape.

Apply tape to cover the whole surface of the blanket to protect
it from damage when re-inserting the inner boot/lining.

Enjoy your warm feet on the slopes!

 

HANDS, same prior assumptions:

1.  Neoprene Mitt covers?

2.  Thin gloves silk?

3.  Chemical warmers?

4.  Baby Powder and Cayenne?

 

Gracias!

post #2 of 26
Fastest fix is work harder. Too much cruising is cold. Do some trees or bumps, some hiking to a special stash.
post #3 of 26
Sib's got it right. I usually get hot going down and pretty cold by the top... If I'm not skinning up.

Treat hands like core. For me that means a snug, base layer like liner glove, and a roomy, gore-tex mitten shell with minimal polartec lining. Hands heat up quickly with activity/exertion... Gloves are usually the first thing I take off if I'm earning turns.

I just added intuition liners to my boots... Warm!
post #4 of 26

I'm struggling with this and am progressing to the overkill area in warmth.  I've been complaining about my race boots being cold, to only realize they're too warm and wicked snug.  I think if they were molded a little looser, it wouldn't be as bad but I'm not changing it.  They are so snug I can only fit in a sock liner.  Even a thin ski sock is very uncomfortable.  The next issue is my feet sweat so they get cold. 

 

My answer to this is (I'm hoping) is on the normal ski days, try to vent some of the heat out by unbuckling for the lift ride.  On the wicked cold days, I'm going to use Hotronics.  I found them new on Amazon for $171 so I bought my daughter and I a pair.  Still have to install them and will do that this week.  I'm going to Brettonwoods this Friday and the high is something like 12 that day :eek!

 

My reasoning for the hotronics is that though my feet are already so warm they sweat, I'll keep cooking them so they don't get cold.

 

The other thing I've found that helps greatly is when I take a break, if only for 20 minutes, I take my ski boots off and put on my regular sock (over the sock liners) and boots.  This dries and warms my feet back up and gives my boots a chance to dry/warm.  On longer breaks I'll put those little orange warmers in them to circulate the air.  That works great but you have to take a break every couple of hours or so.

 

I use boot gloves and have the reflective tape on them too.

 

Ken

post #5 of 26
I have perennially sweaty feet. Not because they're too hot; just because they are. Which, of course, means they get cold. I found last year that religious application of antiperspirant before bed really helped. You have to start the regime at least a few days before you ski. So, for instructors or other very frequent skiers, that means every night.
post #6 of 26
I find that a liner for my gloves or mitts takes care of hands. I use a pair of thin Columbia gloves with the reflective material inside and my hands stay comfortable on the lift. My feet have gotten cold on long lift rides (in Maine, not in Nova Scotia where I live) and have seen the boot gloves on Instructors....where can you get those? Or are they a DIY item.
post #7 of 26

The other thing to watch for especially in the hands would be putting too much on and restricting circulation....actually that would apply to boots as well if you have a particularly snug fit or where more than one pair of socks or too thick of a sock.

post #8 of 26

My wife really really struggled with cold feet and it almost ruined skiing for her.   I bought her a set of hotronic foot warmers last year and now she's happy happy.   We usually set them on level 2 and she's not once gotten cold feet.   It has helped her stay warm overall more as well (legs, core, etc).   She's still very hesitant to ski when it's below 10F, but at least she doesn't get cold when skiing in more normal temps.

 

We also use glove liners when it's really cold and they work really well.   You can get a good pair for $15 on sale...

post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by NovaLoafah View Post

I find that a liner for my gloves or mitts takes care of hands. I use a pair of thin Columbia gloves with the reflective material inside and my hands stay comfortable on the lift. My feet have gotten cold on long lift rides (in Maine, not in Nova Scotia where I live) and have seen the boot gloves on Instructors....where can you get those? Or are they a DIY item.

 

See for example http://www.amazon.com/DryGuy-BootGlove-Covers-Black-Medium/dp/B0000TSQ8E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1386699899&sr=8-1&keywords=boot+gloves

post #10 of 26

I find Boot Gloves to be effective for feet.  It's fairly rare that I need to use them.  I use thin glove liners inside my gloves.  They can stay on when you have to take a glove off for something requiring finger dexterity.   When you're in SLC check out Costco to see if they have the Head Gore-Tex and Outlast gloves for the unbelievable price of less than $20.  Those gloves also have a zipper on the back where you can insert a heat pack.  But the bottom line is that if your hands get cold easily, you need mittens.  And I would still wear glove liners inside the mittens.

 

Quote:
Fastest fix is work harder. Too much cruising is cold. Do some trees or bumps, some hiking to a special stash.  

Thus is true.  Wind chill on your face skiing fast groomers can be very uncomfortable.   I find a face mask necessary under those conditions once the temps approach zero F.

 

This inquiry is just one more reason that Big Sky is a poor choice for the OP at the coldest time of the year.  It was only 5-10F when I was there in early March.  The OP lives in the Dominican Republic.  Even single digits are going to be way out of his comfort zone.  He's also an exclusively groomer skier, which will exacerbate the cold issues as sibhusky noted.   Utah is the warmest subregion of the Rockies. Big Sky is probably the coldest big mountain destination in the western U.S., second coldest to Banff in western North America by my experience.

post #11 of 26
What to do now?

Electric boot heaters and hand helds in the gloves. Problems fixed. I use the adhesive toe heaters in the gloves so they don't fall out at breaks.
post #12 of 26
Thread Starter 

Is there a "best" chemical warmer (or worst)?

post #13 of 26

I like the idea.  I was going to tape heaters to my boots with duct tape, which I think would of worked as well.

post #14 of 26

i'm not convinced that the reflective film does anything at all unless its facing an air gap.

 

reflective film sandwiched between solids like between a footbed and a boot shell?    I call placebo.

post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by like2ski123 View Post
 

I like the idea.  I was going to tape heaters to my boots with duct tape, which I think would of worked as well.

 

Hmmm..wouldn't think that would work at all unless the boots had zero insulation in the liner.

 

Cold feet. You pretty much have to get electric boot heaters.

post #16 of 26

Why wouldn't it work?  It's a device producing heat next to the shell.

post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by like2ski123 View Post
 

Why wouldn't it work?  It's a device producing heat next to the shell.

 

It's on the wrong side of the shell, the wrong side of the insulated liner and outside getting the heat sucked out of it.

post #18 of 26

It would still heat the shell, and you could put the mylar between the duct tape and heater.

post #19 of 26
Put some weather stripping between the shell overlap under the two front buckles. My brand new Technica boots are leaking like sieve there, on wet snow day I can actually see snow getting inside, just imagine how much cold air is getting in.
post #20 of 26
You know, you're trying to fix what most would consider a defect. I certainly would. The only possible reason to put up with it is it took SO LONG to get the fit right. Why is no one going back to the boot makers to lodge a complaint? $500, $600? And they leak under what should be considered normal use???
post #21 of 26
I did search around the forums but seems every brand leak more or less. The only reason I knew it's leaking is the transparent shell. If you look at the boots it's just two hard plastic flaps overlapping each other, no way they would be watertight. It would take me longer to even find contact info for the manufacturer than to stick two piece of weatherstripping on the boots.

Besides in my experience these big manufacturers don't even respond to individual customer. I contacted Atomic last year inquiring on getting some binding parts, they didn't even bother to send a "we don't have it" reply. I've bought two new skis since, neither is Atomic.
post #22 of 26

Ken,

 

Are these the Salomon X Max 120 boots that you were talking about originally being too cold?  What changes did you make to get them warmer?  I also recently switched from Kryptons/Intuitions to the X-Max 120, and they were quite cold the first day out despite modest temps.

 

Please let me know what you did to get them warm, as I will likely try the same tactics.

 

Thanks!

post #23 of 26

mk,

http://www.epicski.com/t/123014/iney-meany-shishka-beany#post_1678237

 

Yes the boots are XMax 120.  I went with the Hotronics and love them.  Solved the problem.  More details in the link above.  I'm going to try and get some picks and or video up this weekend on how I did everything and what I think I should have done.

 

Ken

post #24 of 26
Ken,

Originally you mentioned the 120s being very cold. Sounds like Hotronics worked well, but what about the boot glove and reflector tape (ie was that good enough on most days)?

Also, what type of reflector tape did you use?
post #25 of 26
The boot glove and tape wasn't enough for me. Emphasis on me. The tape is heat reflective tape.
Edited by L&AirC - 1/25/14 at 2:46am
post #26 of 26
Thread Starter 

Hello again amig@s!   Trip report coming....

 

RE feet:  my solution that worked 99% WAS SIMPLY LOOSE BUCKLES, that's it.  Feet still perspired, but took boots off only once, at Moonbasin on a very windy, snowy and cold day.

 

But will probably invest in Hotronics or similar, and antiperspirant.

 

Cheers!

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