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Specialized suing for use of name Roubaix - Page 2

post #31 of 59

post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrstrat57 View Post


We have often wondered which came first. I thought Fuji Roubaix nameplate went back to down tube shifting at least.....

 

Fuji sez they first used it  May 29, 1987 - so you're right.

post #33 of 59

Sorry but Specialized just sucks as a company.  You can ask many, many, many bike shop owners who have had to deal with getting muscled by them.  Want to carry Specialized bikes?  You'd better cancel your contracts with Giant, for example.  Many have complied begrudgingly.  They act just like Walmart does pushing around manufacturers.  And just because a company can get away with something doesn't mean they should.

post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post
 

Sorry but Specialized just sucks as a company.  You can ask many, many, many bike shop owners who have had to deal with getting muscled by them.  Want to carry Specialized bikes?  You'd better cancel your contracts with Giant, for example. 

 

 

Bikesdirect.com looks better every day.  Lots of equivalent bikes, at about half of Specialized price.  We have five of them and just ordered fatbikes to add to the collection.

post #35 of 59
post #36 of 59

I hear they're suing France for using the word "Allez!" at the Tour!  Those French Frying bastards!!!

post #37 of 59

Its pretty much over.  The CEO of Specialized had to call the 900 sq ft store in Alberta and surrender. (from the Café Roubaix facebook page)

 

Places like Facebook, Twitter, Epicski are helping us purge the world of true dicks.

post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

I'm a little torn on this one. 

I get the idea that Specialized has a trademark on the name Roubaix, but at the same time, its a name of a region in another country.  How extensively can Specialized OWN this name? 
.....and the name Specialized is ......well.......special-ized. 

How far should something like this be pushed? 

http://velonews.competitor.com/2013/12/news/must-read-specialized-muscles-vet-over-shops-name_310755

Specialized is doing what any company would do with competent legal advice. There isn't even a gray area here, it's their responsibility. That may not sound good to those who thrive on villainous motives and bad guys.

A new business has a responsibility to clear their name as to registered IP. If there's someone at fault it's Roubaix for not doing that.
post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

Its pretty much over.  The CEO of Specialized had to call the 900 sq ft store in Alberta and surrender. (from the Café Roubaix facebook page)

Guess they finally got some competent public relations advice.
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorenzzo View Post


Specialized is doing what any company would do with competent legal advice. There isn't even a gray area here, it's their responsibility.

 

Oh really?  spare us your legal analysis.  Any lawyer worth paying could find an elegant solution.  As it was, they launched into a PR fiasco over a trademark they did not even own, a trademark difficult to defend even if they had owned it, and pissed off their entire customer base.  The Fuji people made monkeys out of Specialized,  and the social media did a United Breaks Guitars on them.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YGc4zOqozo

post #41 of 59

^^^ That was a great post.

post #42 of 59

Holy Crap!

 

The CEO came up to grovel in person:

 

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=429367720519294&set=vb.219609484828453&type=2&theater

 

He understands the business a bit better than his lawyers.

post #43 of 59

Great news and a really nice gesture.  That makes me feel better about owning a Specialized bike.  Still not sure if I want to own two now.

post #44 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
 

Holy Crap!

 

The CEO came up to grovel in person:

 

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=429367720519294&set=vb.219609484828453&type=2&theater

 

He understands the business a bit better than his lawyers.

I just saw that on Facebook too.  

Happy for the shop 

post #45 of 59
Anyone know how Big S got started? That'll turn you off from ever buying one!
post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by iriponsnow View Post

Anyone know how Big S got started? That'll turn you off from ever buying one!

 

Since you seem to know the story of how Specialized began why don't you enlighten us?

post #47 of 59

I'd like to tell you what I remember of Specialized, but I don't want to be sued!  :-p

post #48 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by iriponsnow View Post

Anyone know how Big S got started? That'll turn you off from ever buying one!

 

Heh.

post #49 of 59

I actually like Specialized stuff for the most part.  Their frame geometry agrees with me for the most part..I like their specs mostly.  I was around early on..as I recall, they pioneered the outsource to Asia thing for bicycles.  England was waning as far as bicycle production goes..still some USA..Blackburn, Ritchey, Cannondale, Gary Fisher.  Japan was a powerhouse, Fuji, Miyata, a lot of off-shore production for US and international brands.  And as I recall, Specialized never really manufactured anything.  They basically were early-on adopters of the "call Taiwan and tell them what you want" manufacturing philosophy.  We had a bit of a bias, right or wrong, against them because we saw them as simply resellers of Asian product.  Specialized was one of the brands that put Taiwan and Giant Manufacturing on the map.  It doesn't seem a big deal these days, but it was certainly different back then in the days of Campagnolo and Cinelli, old world craftsmanship.

 

It's been interesting to watch the progression of labour sources in the bicycle market as each has waxed and waned..England, Italy, US, Japan, Taiwan, China, India, Thailand.  I wonder who the next source of cheap labour will be.

post #50 of 59
Wish I could afford a 7 axiom or similar from just up the street in Watertown Ma.

Can't do it so the roubaix / ultegra rolls on. Comfortable, light and quick.

Bianch Columbus frame with full chorus backs it up.

It's all good I guess. I'll post again if I get any sarcastic grief out on the road this spring....
post #51 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 

Specialized was one of the brands that put Taiwan and Giant Manufacturing on the map.  It doesn't seem a big deal these days, but it was certainly different back then in the days of Campagnolo and Cinelli, old world craftsmanship.

 

<threadDrift>

I worked in bike shops when Specialized was getting going, c. 1980, and owned a couple of bikes with Asian parts, from the late '70s. As I recall, Specialized had already made a dent with tires, but not yet with frames. Anyway, my point is about the Euro brands at that time. The reasons the Asians blew them out of the water was basically because only the top-of-the-line stuff from the Euro brands was any good. There was no "old world craftsmanship" to be found in any of the rest of it. (Anyone remember those essentially useless Huret derailleurs that seemed to come on every second bike?) From a quality perspective, a good Suntour shift group, for example, was way more reliable than most Campy stuff, was less expensive, and was also designed with American needs in mind. (Touring was a big thing then, and the Euro changers were all oriented toward corncob clusters that no one except a small handful of brainwashed europhiles and the six actual racers in the state really wanted. :rolleyes

</threadDrift>

post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

 

<threadDrift>

I worked in bike shops when Specialized was getting going, c. 1980, and owned a couple of bikes with Asian parts, from the late '70s. As I recall, Specialized had already made a dent with tires, but not yet with frames. Anyway, my point is about the Euro brands at that time. The reasons the Asians blew them out of the water was basically because only the top-of-the-line stuff from the Euro brands was any good. There was no "old world craftsmanship" to be found in any of the rest of it. (Anyone remember those essentially useless Huret derailleurs that seemed to come on every second bike?) From a quality perspective, a good Suntour shift group, for example, was way more reliable than most Campy stuff, was less expensive, and was also designed with American needs in mind. (Touring was a big thing then, and the Euro changers were all oriented toward corncob clusters that no one except a small handful of brainwashed europhiles and the six actual racers in the state really wanted. :rolleyes

</threadDrift>

 

Totally.  Remember the Simplex plastic derailleurs?  Can't tell you how many of those I've seen... Even top of the line, Dura Ace destroyed Campy for the most part for a lot less money.  I have a soft spot for some Campy stuff..mostly because you could actually service them and purchase parts for them and the Nuovo and Super Record was nicely made and machined..but as far as cost and quality, Japanese stuff rocked, no question.  But, as you say and what I was really referring to, was the Europhile crowd who loved the "old world" stuff.  I suppose there was a bit of nostalgia, the perception that Japanese stuff was crap, no character etc..that was the feeling back then.  Cannondale tapped into that feeling, stressing their Made in USA frames.  Meanwhile, as a lot of industries discovered, Specialized could get stuff made in Taiwan, well,  for not much money.

 

Mafac, Simplex, Huret, Sachs, even Sturmey Archer's deficient 3-speed hub..don't miss'em.  :-) 

post #53 of 59

Quoted from canoe (Touring was a big thing then, and the Euro changers were all oriented toward corncob clusters that no one except a small handful of brainwashed europhiles and the six actual racers in the state really wanted. :rolleyes

 

Ha Ha Ha  Looks like there are some serious bike riders here @ Epic Ski.

 

I don't have a Specialized bike but I do have a couple of items made by them.  After reading about the conflict between Mr. Richter's shop and Specialized, I was ready to boycott Specialized for good. But after seeing Newfydog's post about Mr. Sinyard personally apologizing to Mr.Richter @ his shop, well I changed my mind.

 

Interesting Thread

post #54 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post

Since you seem to know the story of how Specialized began why don't you enlighten us?

Thier founder got the ball rolling by taking Keith Bontrager frames to Tiawan for the original designs to be mass produced as Big S.

Later obtained rights to the 4 bar linkage & still holds industry hostage.....


Latest is in keeping w history
post #55 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by iriponsnow View Post


Thier founder got the ball rolling by taking Keith Bontrager frames to Tiawan for the original designs to be mass produced as Big S.

Later obtained rights to the 4 bar linkage & still holds industry hostage.....


Latest is in keeping w history

actually, they patented the 'Horst Link' which makes a four bar suspension work better, plenty of four bar bikes that don't infringe on Special Ed's patent.

post #56 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

actually, they patented the 'Horst Link' which makes a four bar suspension work better, plenty of four bar bikes that don't infringe on Special Ed's patent.

Agreed, yet they have sued for models that are close in nature & forced licensing agreements.
post #57 of 59

Not good PR.  Companies, however, spend big bucks to build brands and brands are trademarked.  Is it really fair for someone to trade on a name that has been built by someone else?

 

Perhaps Roubaix is a "specialized" example...

Mike

post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
 

 

Oh really?  spare us your legal analysis.  Any lawyer worth paying could find an elegant solution.  As it was, they launched into a PR fiasco over a trademark they did not even own, a trademark difficult to defend even if they had owned it, and pissed off their entire customer base.  The Fuji people made monkeys out of Specialized,  and the social media did a United Breaks Guitars on them.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YGc4zOqozo


Hope you've had a chance to calm down.  Congrats to those who managed to turn the issue from IP to PR and save the shop's name.  It's all normal tactical business and Specialized responded when the issue turned.  But go back to your evil thoughts and us vs. them black and white through my eyes simple mentality.   And good luck on your next Occupy Wall Street camp out.

 

p.s.  It's obvious you know absolutely nothing about IP.

post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorenzzo View Post


Hope you've had a chance to calm down.  Congrats to those who managed to turn the issue from IP to PR and save the shop's name.  It's all normal tactical business and Specialized responded when the issue turned.  But go back to your evil thoughts and us vs. them black and white through my eyes simple mentality.   And good luck on your next Occupy Wall Street camp out.

p.s.  It's obvious you know absolutely nothing about IP.


That's what makes caring positions great- they vary. FWIW: I don't think you will see Big S being pedaled to the tent city.
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