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i THINK i have my light-weight ski package wishlist done, but could use your experience, pls

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

hello.  i'm 52 and haven;'t bought gear in decades, but consider myself an intermediate with just enough balance to ski the easiest 'out west' black. 6' 240lb.

 

going on my trip of a lifetime to steamboat and will be upgrading the equipment this year.  i am looking for a super light get-up and with my budget, it looks like dynafit tlt5 will be a good choice, at about 2.5 lb's a boot.  at that point dynafit tlt vertical ft 12 w/ 92mm brakes bindings are also must - about a pound a piece.  i've also located a nice pair of Ski Trab Stelvio Touring Skis that say they are 5lbs for both.

 

here's where it gets tricky for my lack of intelligence.  all i'm going to do is ski downhill greens, blues & the easiest black - maybe :) - at steamboat.  i'm reading all about light ski setups like this are being used for back-country or touring...what about just needing a light ski setup just to feel younger?  am i buying too much ski?  will these choices work as sweetly as i'm thinking?

 

thanks for your opinions!

berbes

post #2 of 23

IMHO, unless you intend to tour and skin uphill, your target gear makes no sense at all for your intended use.

post #3 of 23

IMHO of course: Lightweight is important if you are doing tricks.  It is important if you are climbing uphill without a lift.  It helps if your are redirecting your skis in midair to avoid speering a mogul.  It may make it easier to recover from mistakes.  It is not needed for downhill skiing.  The heaviest skis seem like they weigh nothing when you are standing on them.  Weight should not be a big factor in your selection of skis for alpine skiing.  You do not have to move skis around to ski with proper technique.  You just have to tip and pressure them and let the snow do the work.  Forget about weight.

post #4 of 23

When I started skiing more than just a few days every few years, I was about 50.  What I learned when I started buying skis is that the only time weight was an issue was carrying them in from the parking lot.  As a petite skier, a slightly heavier ski actually seemed better as an intermediate based on trying out demo skis.  As I improved, I bought skis flat in order to have a lightweight binding instead of skis with system bindings.

 

@berbes : where do you normally ski?  If you aren't going to ski out west often, have you considered just bringing your boots and renting?

post #5 of 23
Perhaps the OP is a cyclist transferring equipment priorities (ill-advisedly) to lift service skiing?
post #6 of 23

All other things being equal, light is better. But things are never equal.

 

I am a believer in light equipment. I personally prefer my Full Tilt boots, light Marker bindings and Goode Carbon skis. In powder, I break out my Praxis Backcountry skis. All very light both in weight and feel. But I also own Volkl Race Tiger SL skis with the integrated bindings. A rather heavy weight to carry to the lifts but a very light feel on the snow.

 

I have had skis feel too light on the snow. I've also had some fairly light weighing skis that felt skied like they were made of lead (my old K2 KVCs were the worst). And I've really enjoyed riding some heavy (in weight and feel) skis. You really need to demo to see what you like.

 

I must point out the compromises I accept with light equipment. I don't ski fast which is nice because my light feeling skis aren't that comfortable when going fast. I have trouble making pretty long radius carving turns (the mogul fields I prefer discourage this as much as my ski choice). And I hate ice (does the ski have anything to do with that?). Finally, I lose lots of GNAR points throwing twisters off every little jump.

 

Ghost listed a few really valid reasons for light equipment. Enough to convince me that weight really matters! As long as you like the ski's feel. Marznc's idea of light bindings on the ski you like does save a lot of weight without compromising performance (who really needs 13 DIN bindings on blues and easy blacks?). And demoing equipment for a trip out of your region makes so much sense - plus it's really fun to try different skis.

 

@berbes I haven't skied any of your selected equipment despite an appetite for light stuff. I can't offer specific advice on your choices. Weight is just one factor to consider when buying skis. I would make sure the boots are comfortable with a flex pattern you like (as well as light). I would be very hesitant to take untried skis on the "trip of a lifetime" - demo skis on the trip from the local shops who know the good choices for their mountain (and buy what you liked best?). On the other hand, if you are getting a deal on the package, go for it! Just be willing to rent if the equipment doesn't suit you or the conditions.

 

Eric

post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 

thanks for the insights.  i am only using them for downhill (and getting to the top with a chairlift), but have had a few knee surgeries and really feel tired walking around with heavy boots, especially at the end of the day.  i'm looking for some relief in that regard.  it just seems that once you commit to light boots, then the bindings only fit those kind of boots, then the bindings are hooked into those kind of skis...things have gotten complicated since the 80's :)...thanks for the help!

post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by berbes View Post
 

thanks for the insights.  i am only using them for downhill (and getting to the top with a chairlift), but have had a few knee surgeries and really feel tired walking around with heavy boots, especially at the end of the day.  i'm looking for some relief in that regard.  it just seems that once you commit to light boots, then the bindings only fit those kind of boots, then the bindings are hooked into those kind of skis...things have gotten complicated since the 80's :)...thanks for the help!

 

Why are you walking around in ski boots?

 

Put'm on when you are leaving the lodge to ski, take'm off when you get back. Apres ski slip on boots for everything else...

post #9 of 23

The problem with your light weight gear plan is that super lightweight gear is more work for the skier in most conditions. Slightly more substantial gear holds up better as you try to carve on hard snow or break through mixed snow. Super light weight stuff often folds, flexes, and twists a large amount, bucking the user around and so making them use more energy to stay centered and ski well. There are times when this is a perfectly reasonable tradeoff (ie. when the energy saved on the way up outweighs the extra spent on the way down), but lift-served skiing isn't that situation.

 

I think the most energy conserving lift served package would be a medium weight, ~85mm, medium flexing, tip-rockered ski with lighter alpine bindings and mid-weight boots.

 

Maybe something like the Head Rev 85/Blizzard Bushwacker, Tyrolia Peak 11/Salomon STH12 binding, and a boot from the Technica Cochise or Lange XT line.

 

This set up would be notably heavier than your original one, but it would likely be way less tiring to ski lift-served over the course of the day

post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by berbes View Post
 

thanks for the insights.  i am only using them for downhill (and getting to the top with a chairlift), but have had a few knee surgeries and really feel tired walking around with heavy boots, especially at the end of the day.  i'm looking for some relief in that regard.  it just seems that once you commit to light boots, then the bindings only fit those kind of boots, then the bindings are hooked into those kind of skis...things have gotten complicated since the 80's :)...thanks for the help!

Completely understand not wanting to walk around in ski boots.  I avoid it as much as possible when skiing somewhere big enough to get tired.  I generally boot up in the base lodge when not staying in ski in/out lodging.  At lunch there are times I'll take off my boots and walk around in socks.  I always bring along a dry pair of socks any way.

 

I was doing knee rehab a year ago.  Working on better fitness directly related to ski conditioning meant I learned how to build up hamstrings and core strength in a way that meant I could ski harder after the knee injury than before.

 

Since you haven't bought gear in a while, you might find that current regular boots are not as difficult to deal with in terms of weight as you think.

post #11 of 23

Berbes,  everyone is being very polite - so I will be the one who ............  50yrs, 240lbs..............using chairlifts to do downhill skiing ............boots too heavy to walk around in ............

 

Suggestions.  Thinking light is really dumb.  At 240 you will break really light stuff. Buy regular skis and boots and while you are waiting and researching reg. equipment that is lighter than its competitor do some leg exercises and get into better shape.  Walking around in regular downhill boots shouldn't tire out your legs.  Skiing all day in variable terrain should tire out your legs but only in early season.   Don't go buy AT bindings and real light boots and skis that are meant to make it easier to skin uphill and tour - BIG MISTAKE.

post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 

no worries, petey.  there's always someone like you out there.  people with issues taking shots without giving good examples of other gear to use instead.  i'll help you out.

 

i have 25 year old gear that needs replacing with...

 

take your time.  not getting to steamboat until spring ;).

post #13 of 23

Hey berbes, I doubt any of us is taking shots. You are too new for that yet.  :D  Pete is trying to give you tough love, not a hard time.

 

I think we're all just a bit gobsmacked and trying to figure how how you could have gotten to where you've landed with this. It's like you parachuted onto a court sports forum and proceeded to describe how you were planning to play tennis with a badminton racquet. Slight exaggeration, for sure, but it illustrates the point, I think.

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by berbes View Post
 

no worries, petey.  there's always someone like you out there.  people with issues taking shots without giving good examples of other gear to use instead.  i'll help you out.

 

i have 25 year old gear that needs replacing with...

 

take your time.  not getting to steamboat until spring ;).


He is right, you are completely clueless with the set up you have in mind, and are setting yourself up for a bad time. A light ski set up will not make your day easier on the slopes. It just won't.

 

You need to grab yourself an easy skiing modern shape, that is stout enough to handle your size. Good ALPINE bindings like a Rossi FKS, Marker Royal Family, or Salomon STH. You also need good ALPINE boots. You will overpower those dynafits. Go get fitted.

 

Then just demo ski's when you are in Steamboat.

post #15 of 23
Another in the group telling you that, for groomers, cruising, hard pack, I prefer my heavier ski and binding set up, it's much more stable. It's a lot easier on your legs because the skis are not jumping around all over the place and I don't find the weight to be a problem. I have lighter skis for deeper snow and trees, but I do NOT enjoy them as much on crud, ice, or at speed. They are just too easily deflected. To counteract that, you have to push it more.

Skip putting your boots on at the car and put them on in the nice warm lodge. Your toes will stay warmer and it's less exhausting.
post #16 of 23

This is an absolutely horrible idea.  There is no reason whatsoever to be skiing Trabs/Dynafit TLT5s/tech bindings unless you're walking uphill.  For your intended purpose this is one of the worst setups you could purchase IMO.  It would be like taking a hardtail race cross country mountain bike to the lift served downhill park.  Sure, you can make it down, but your equipment will be holding you back.  Heavier gear will end up being less work for your intended purpose since you're not dragging it uphill.  That heft helps a lot when skiing resort conditions.

 

This setup you describe will get tossed around in variable resort snow, be very chattery on hardpack at speed (compared to a dedicated alpine setup), and won't float that well in pow.  Not to mention the poor release/retention characteristics of tech bindings when skiing only in the resort. And you'll probably look like the biggest poser on the mountain.  Bring your backpack, whippet, harness, and ice axe and you'll clinch this title. 

 

If you want to save a little weight, consider something like a Blizzard Kabookie, Nordica Steadfast, or a Nordica Hell & Back.  They're lighter than their counterparts, but they're still legitimate alpine skis that will hold up well to resort use.  Pair these with something like a Technica Cochise boot and Marker Griffons/Jesters.  You'll save a bit of weight but they'll still ski well.  And you get a boot with a walk mode.  All of that being said, there's really no reason to worry about weight given your intended purposes. 

post #17 of 23

If you've already purchased the bindings, though, I'll take them off your hands for cheap.

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post
 


He is right, you are completely clueless with the set up you have in mind, and are setting yourself up for a bad time. A light ski set up will not make your day easier on the slopes. It just won't.

 

You need to grab yourself an easy skiing modern shape, that is stout enough to handle your size. Good ALPINE bindings like a Rossi FKS, Marker Royal Family, or Salomon STH. You also need good ALPINE boots. You will overpower those dynafits. Go get fitted.

 

Then just demo ski's when you are in Steamboat.

 

This is very true. I am 100lb lighter than you, and they feel like bedroom slippers to me. But I have them 90% because of the UP performance, not the DOWN.

 

 

If you insist, there are touring boots that are light and have a walk mode and come with an alpine DIN sole that will fit in normal bindings. Using tech bindings really is not a good idea, please listen to everyone. 

post #19 of 23

Berbes:

 

Nobody here is bashing you.  You asked for advice and we are unanimous that you are headed in the wrong direction.  We are merely trying to prevent you from spending a lot of dough on the wrong ski gear for your intended use.

post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by berbes View Post
 

no worries, petey.  there's always someone like you out there.  people with issues taking shots without giving good examples of other gear to use instead.  i'll help you out.

 

i have 25 year old gear that needs replacing with...

 

take your time.  not getting to steamboat until spring ;).

 

OK berbes.  As mentioned buy boots and rent your skis at Steamboat.   First, review boot posts here on Epic there are a ton of them.  If weight is important go to shops and start trying them on.  Go for fit and no hot spots and you will be able to tell if they are too heavy.  Get a good shop with a good bootfitter.  As you will read here on Epic most shops or at least quite a few will try to sell you boots that are too big - because they are comfortable.  Go to Steamboat with the proper clothes and good ski socks and your boots. Do not wear your ski socks on the car trip there (you feet will perspire and be cold when you get on the hill - keep them dry).  Take your new boots and socks into the lodge, put them on there and rent skis.

 

Tell the crew at Steamboat that you haven't skied in 25 yrs and would like them to fit you properly (you will get the new shaped ski and you will love them - they turn soooooo easy.  Then walk over to the ski instruction place and tell them the same thing you told the ski rental person and take a lesson. Then subsequent days you can rent the same skis or something else while you look for a ski you like.

 

AND. You'd be surprised if you knew how many guys there are here on epic that really would like to help you..............................but.  Ski GEAR has changed a lot in 25 years and even more so in the 40 plus I've been sliding around.

post #21 of 23
Somewhere on the site there's names of boot fitters, a really long thread. Don't just walk into a ski shop and assume the first guy that nabs you knows what he is doing. Read up on it here so you know what to look for in the way of fit and if the guy doesn't seem to be a whiz, leave. If the shop is not in a ski area, chances are 90% that the guy doesn't know what he's doing. The good ones gravitate to ski areas. Not saying it's impossible.. Hence the 10%.
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Somewhere on the site there's names of boot fitters, a really long thread. Don't just walk into a ski shop and assume the first guy that nabs you knows what he is doing. Read up on it here so you know what to look for in the way of fit and if the guy doesn't seem to be a whiz, leave. If the shop is not in a ski area, chances are 90% that the guy doesn't know what he's doing. The good ones gravitate to ski areas. Not saying it's impossible.. Hence the 10%.

  YEP. since you aren't skiing till Spring just wait until you get to Steamboat and get your boots there.   Post a question after you search here, put the question on Gear forum and ask if anyone knows a good bootfitter in steamboat, then you'll be set.

post #23 of 23
I heard that my previous boot fitter moved back to Steamboat, but I don't know what shop he's at. Blake Peterson.
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