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When is it too cold to ski? - Page 5

post #121 of 137
Today is -20c/-4f with strong wind, I chickened out. If there's no wind I'd probably go, but windchill is brutal.
post #122 of 137

Just got back from a trip to Banff, and while the first few days were fabulous at near -5C to 1C, it got cold near the end of our trip. How cold?  With wind, it was -40C (-40F) ! It finally warmed up to a balmy -25C (-13F) by midday.

 

So, were we crazy or dedicated to hit the slopes??  Not quite sure, it's a fine line sometimes.

 

post #123 of 137
This past weekend it worked to my advantage. Mom and kids thought it was too cold to ski at 1*F and no wind, so I got to go solo. It's been a long time since I've been able to ski by myself and I really got a great workout in. 6" of freshies was too good to pass up.
post #124 of 137
Sometime Dec 2010, we went up to Whistler for four days. The first day was foggy and cold but we were fine. The second day the sun came out and the temperature dropped below zero. It was so freaking cold that no amount of boot gloves or foot warmers worked. Everyone was in the lodge from 10 to 12 and there were only a handful of snowboarders out in the slopes. Even the ski instructors were inside. I thought my toes were going to fall off.
post #125 of 137

NEVER!

 

I have gone swimming in low ~30* F water, granted I had a dry suit. It is not about how cold the weather is outside, but how cold you are. It is much colder when you are wet wearing only a bathing suit in 50* weather than 20* weather in snow gear.

 

-Solarity

post #126 of 137
Um, 20 degrees is warm weather.
post #127 of 137

If you want your skiing fix, it will never be to cold!

 

So, Hell could freeze over and you would go out and ski.

 

The real question should be when it to warm to ski, and here is the answer.

 

Skiing in Dubai.

 

 

:D

post #128 of 137

Cold days are a gift: they keep the crowds away and often follow snow events. 

 

I've never skied under about -20, but I would if it got that cold while I was up there. I find that I don't tend to get cold hands and feet regardless of the temperature if my core is truly warm. When my hands and feet have been cold, I find that my core is chilly, even if it's not bad enough for me to feel entirely cold all over. If I bundle up to the point where my core is warm, the hands and feet follow. 

post #129 of 137

Hate to admit it, but I bagged my usual Tuesday morning skiing today. Yeah, it was cold (5 deg. F) but overcast which always makes it feel colder. It's amazing how "decorative sun" (stolen term) makes it feel warmer.

post #130 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclist View Post

Sometime Dec 2010, we went up to Whistler for four days. The first day was foggy and cold but we were fine. The second day the sun came out and the temperature dropped below zero. It was so freaking cold that no amount of boot gloves or foot warmers worked. Everyone was in the lodge from 10 to 12 and there were only a handful of snowboarders out in the slopes. Even the ski instructors were inside. I thought my toes were going to fall off.

I don't ever use boot/glove warmers and I regularly ski in below zero temps during Dec. and Jan. -10 to -20 starts to get rough enough to cut the day shorter. Instructors come inside because their classes are often filled with weenies who beg to go inside. Instructors are only happy to oblige since it's cold standing around and they're getting paid to keep their classes happy.

post #131 of 137

When you find part of your boot shattered off when clicking out of your bindings :)

post #132 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by perplexed View Post
 

When you find part of your boot shattered off when clicking out of your bindings :)


No.  That's when your boots are too old.  Good boots will withstand temperatures at Earthly ski slopes.

post #133 of 137

I skied Big Sky Wed Feb 5, 2014.  I had planned to ski Bridger but they delayed their opening due to anticipated cold weather (-25 deg F). I arrived at Big Sky with my warmest ski clothing, ready to ski,  at 9 AM  and 29 below to find that no lifts were running. I asked why and ski patrol told me all the bullwheels were frozen and the lifts could not spin. We had to wait until 11 AM when then temperature rose to 20 below and the lifts would finally spin. I guess on that day 29 below was too cold to ski. I should have gone to Bridger and hiked!

post #134 of 137

Recall being in the Willy Schaeffler weekly ski program at A-Basin in the mid 60's when temps dropped to -40*F one day.  Winds kicked up and Patrol shut down the entire mountain, requiring everyone to enter the lodge and stay there until they swept the mountain.  Small patrols went out with radios and for specific time periods.  Families were reunited and announcements were made to help those who were having difficulty locating family and friends.

 

Not sure if that would happen today.  Only time I've ever experienced a mountain shut down because of temperature.

post #135 of 137

It is easier to handle cold weather now than it was in the past, better textiles allow for thinner warmer layers than ever before at low cost.

 

Now I find at worst I have to throw on a sweater under the jacket, with a thin wicking layer underneath and am toasty warm, regardless of the temps.  Heated boot and gloves are available (luckily I don't need them as my core is warm.)  Great fitting goggles and helmet with a little face covering and you are good to go.  The hardest part is not to overheat and sweat, which does get you cold quickly.

 

For those old enough to remember those days, you know what I'm talking about.  For those that don't, ski some old vintage gear, boots, skis and most importantly vintage ski clothing on an extremely cold day.

 

" I am cold will take on a whole new meaning."

post #136 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by medmarkco View Post
 

Small patrols went out with radios and for specific time periods.  Families were reunited and announcements were made to help those who were having difficulty locating family and friends.

Did anyone survive the night out in the storm by climbing into a Tauntaun? "And I thought they smelled bad, on the outside."

post #137 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smushie View Post
 

Did anyone survive the night out in the storm by climbing into a Tauntaun? "And I thought they smelled bad, on the outside."

There was an intergalactical time warp just the day prior and the Wampa Utes decimated the Tauntaun population.  Not a Tauntaun to be found for warmth.  No survivors.

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