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Recommendation for Intermediate Skis and Boots - Also, thoughts on Volkl AC30

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I have not skied in a few years but based on the skill classification system I seem to be a level 6.  I ski almost exclusively on the east coast, primarily Hunter, Killington, Stowe, etc.  This year I have a lot of time available and plan to jump into skiing in a big way.  Right now I am pretty comfortable on most blue trails but feel out of control on black diamonds.  My goal is to get comfortable on black diamonds.  I probably will get a season pass at Hunter.  I am 5'10" and weight about 165.

 

I was planning to rent equipment for the season.  However, I do not mind making a reasonable investment (maybe $600 or slightly more) for skis and boots if I can get them.  My inclination is to try to find good used skis and get new boots.  So here are my questions:

 

1)  I found Volkl AC30 skis with binding brand new on Craigslist for $400.  He doesn't seem negotiable.  They are available in 170 and 184 sizes.  What I have read about these skis give me the impression they will be pretty good for my transition from blue to black diamond.  Does anyone have any thoughts on whether these skis are appropriate for me?  Also, am I better off at 170 or 184.  From what I have read they are both within my size range but am I better off going shorter or longer.

 

2) Assuming I am looking for post-2010 skis that are appropriate for my skill level, do you have any other recommendations of new or used skis that I should look for, keeping in mind my overall budget?  I am not against new skis if I can afford them but I don't think I can get new skis and boots in my price range.

 

3)  Do you have any recommendations for appropriate boots for my skill level and price range?

 

Thanks for your help.  I have done quite a bit of reading online, and this shopping process has been very challenging to say the least.  Hopefully this community of experts can help shed some light for me.

 

David

post #2 of 12

Hi I recently too got back into skiing, and your opening paragraph sounds just like me apart from the weight I'm 200lbs (all muscle of course) I too have inquired here about intermediate skis and boots. We would probably suit a similar ski just different lengths due to our weight differences. I was recommended a range of skis as I had said I ski predominantly on groomers, but would like to ski some off piste too. The width of ski under foot pretty much the wider you go the better suited for powder/off trail and the thinner you go for skiing hard pack icy groomers. that is a generalization of course. I hopefully will be trying out and demoing several skis such as Rossignol 88's Line Prophet 98's Volkl Mantra 98's  all of these are catoregised as 'All-Mountain ' skis...go anywhere! does that sound like you/

post #3 of 12

Volkl AC30 unlimited is an advanced ski.  I happen to own a pair, in 177 cm length in great condition.  I have not used them for several years, but still have them.  Good carver and quite predictable.  Very stiff tail.  Not the best in moguls.  OK in variable snow, as long as you know what you are doing.  Not a cheater ski by any means, but a solid, predictable ski that rewards good technique.

 

Waist is 76 mm.  TR is 18.4M.  And the Sellers's asking price at $400 is way high.

 

If interested, PM me.  Mine have been skied about 25 days in total, and always well taken care of.

 

 

BTW mine are the AC3 unlimited from 2006-7.  They are the exact same ski as the following year's 2007-8 AC30 unlimited.  Current AC3 is a different, lower level ski.

 

BTW, for your size, I would go with the 170 or 177, but definitely not the 184.

post #4 of 12

Doolman,

I'd strongly suggest you NOT go for the AC30's (unless you've already bought them which in that case they're perfect :)).  
People who had them liked them...but not everyone felt that way.  They are a generation or two old design, fairly stiff, and require a fairly attentive and skilled driver.  Much more suited to hard snow than soft.  You could certainly do worse....but I think you could also do better.

 

Your size calls for 170-ish, not 184 in most skis.  

 

I'd spend money on the best-fitting, most responsive boots you can find, then rent or demo skis for awhile.  Boots are forever; skis come and go.  

post #5 of 12

Those will be fine in 170cm. I would look at getting a good boot from a boot fitter. If you shop now you may be able to some of last years higher end boots, in a 110 flex that will be good for you and save some money.

 

Find a great boot fitter that knows how to recommend the right boot for you.

 

Buying boots is a process, I just bought new Langes 3 weeks ago. I made sure the new guy in the boot fitters shop I've been using for 20 years knew what I expected. When I met this new guy. I told him, "Shon normally takes care of me". He told me his back ground and who he worked for and learned from for the past 10 years, Greg Hoffman. I said ok, let do this.

 

Just like Shon has done every time I get new boots, he watched me walk, looked at my everyday shoes, my old ski boots, my custom footbed, checked the bones in both feet, checked my knee's and leg alignment. Asked me how I ski, what type of terrain I ski. Check my feet on the size thing, and recommended a few boots.

 

Boot are the most important part ! period.

 

OH, BTW, I have a pair of AC30's from 3-4 years ago with about 12 day's on them. My son is going to ski them this weekend, at Okemo, his first time back on skis in about 9 years. He's 26 y/o now, about your size, he's a ex-racer.

post #6 of 12

I had the AC30's but never loved them, sold them 2 years ago.  I am 5'-9" and weigh 150lbs.  They were very stiff, best for heavier skiers.  If you maintain perfect technique they worked fine, but be slightly off and they would kick you!  Plus it is an old design.  The newer skis are more fun and perform well in a variety of conditions.

post #7 of 12

I bought the Volkl RTM75 as an intermediate skier and loved them except I passed the level of intermediate very quickly.  I regretted getting skis for just the level I was at for that moment.  I wish I had bought some more advanced skis because after a year and a half I was told be a very good instructor at Breckenridge that i had surpassed my skis and boots (Lange Blaster 80s).

 

I have now bought Volkl Kendos and some tecnica 110 boots.  This is a set up that I hope will last me several years. 

 

So I don't know much about skis or boots at all.  I rely on some friends in the know and a lot of reading online.  This forum helped too.  My Point is buy a ski that is a little bit of a reach skill wise so you can grow into them.  Same with boots I guess.

 

Good luck. 

post #8 of 12

Geez no one's said this yet? I guess I'll have to be the one in this thread. You are going to spend the majority of that 600$ you've allotted on boots. See a reputable bootfitter and let him work his magic. Everyones feet are different and not only does buying from a bootfitter ensure you're getting something the proper flex/footshape/size, but they should also customize the canting to your legs and do any punching/grinding to make sure you're not going to be sore and miserable. For skis I would recommend buying second hand if your on a budget, as long as there's no core shots or sidewall damage you can get a full tune at a shop and they'll ski good as new for half the price.

post #9 of 12
Quote:

Originally Posted by Thewal2 View Post

 

 My Point is buy a ski that is a little bit of a reach skill wise so you can grow into them.

 

I agree with this, especially for someone skiing mostly groomed. If you're going to work on improving over the next few seasons, don't buy an "intermediate" ski.  Buy a ski that rewards good technique and learn how to make it sing. The late-model AC30s are certainly stiff, but they wouldn't be a bad frontside carver for you in a 170.  That said, $400 used is totally ridiculous. Check eBay and you'll see. 

 

I'm also surprised it took 8 posts for someone to mention that you'll want to spend the vast majority of that $600 on boots, which are far more important than skis. Most skis made in the last 5 year are good, but boots have to fit. Not something that should be done online. Call around to the shops near the areas you ski, tell them your budget and what you're looking for, and I bet someone will be able to hook you up.

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by kauffee View Post

 

I'm also surprised it took 8 posts for someone to mention that you'll want to spend the vast majority of that $600 on boots, which are far more important than skis.

This is the best advice anyone who knows about skiing, these two quotes are the golden rule of skiing...Boots from a Bootfitter!!! Myself have only this week put away $500 and is allocated for Boots alone. Fingers crossed that's enough.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikoras View Post
 

Geez no one's said this yet? I guess I'll have to be the one in this thread. You are going to spend the majority of that 600$ you've allotted on boots. See a reputable bootfitter and let him work his magic. Everyones feet are different and not only does buying from a bootfitter ensure you're getting something the proper flex/footshape/size, but they should also customize the canting to your legs and do any punching/grinding to make sure you're not going to be sore and miserable. For skis I would recommend buying second hand if your on a budget, as long as there's no core shots or sidewall damage you can get a full tune at a shop and they'll ski good as new for half the price.

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by doolman View Post
 

I have not skied in a few years but based on the skill classification system I seem to be a level 6.  I ski almost exclusively on the east coast, primarily Hunter, Killington, Stowe, etc.  This year I have a lot of time available and plan to jump into skiing in a big way.  Right now I am pretty comfortable on most blue trails but feel out of control on black diamonds.  My goal is to get comfortable on black diamonds.  I probably will get a season pass at Hunter.  I am 5'10" and weight about 165.

 

I was planning to rent equipment for the season.  However, I do not mind making a reasonable investment (maybe $600 or slightly more) for skis and boots if I can get them.  My inclination is to try to find good used skis and get new boots.  So here are my questions:

 

1)  I found Volkl AC30 skis with binding brand new on Craigslist for $400.  He doesn't seem negotiable.  They are available in 170 and 184 sizes.  What I have read about these skis give me the impression they will be pretty good for my transition from blue to black diamond.  Does anyone have any thoughts on whether these skis are appropriate for me?  Also, am I better off at 170 or 184.  From what I have read they are both within my size range but am I better off going shorter or longer.

 

2) Assuming I am looking for post-2010 skis that are appropriate for my skill level, do you have any other recommendations of new or used skis that I should look for, keeping in mind my overall budget?  I am not against new skis if I can afford them but I don't think I can get new skis and boots in my price range.

 

3)  Do you have any recommendations for appropriate boots for my skill level and price range?

 

Thanks for your help.  I have done quite a bit of reading online, and this shopping process has been very challenging to say the least.  Hopefully this community of experts can help shed some light for me.

 

David

Welcome to EpicSki!  You are on the right track in thinking you want new boots but used skis are fine.  But new boots don't have to be the current model year.  Find a good boot fitter and they may have "new old stock" in the back that will work well for you.  Have you read the First Run articles (click on Articles in the menu bar) about buying boots or skis?  A list of boot fitters can be found at the top of the Ask The Boot Guys section.  No one can recommend a particular boot because there are so many variations to feet, legs, and internal boot shape.

post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikoras View Post

Geez no one's said this yet? I guess I'll have to be the one in this thread. You are going to spend the majority of that 600$ you've allotted on boots. See a reputable bootfitter and let him work his magic. Everyones feet are different and not only does buying from a bootfitter ensure you're getting something the proper flex/footshape/size, but they should also customize the canting to your legs and do any punching/grinding to make sure you're not going to be sore and miserable. For skis I would recommend buying second hand if your on a budget, as long as there's no core shots or sidewall damage you can get a full tune at a shop and they'll ski good as new for half the price.


 



Hye, I guess you didn't read post 4 and 5... wink.gif

Boots are the most important part.
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