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How much carbon is in carbon pole?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
So I bought a pair of carbon pole earlier this year because I had a gift card that I don't know what to do with. Never used them though, afraid they'd grow legs while on the rack.

Today I thought I'd weight them for fun, it turned out they are within 5 grams of what my aluminum poles weight. Granted the aluminum poles are missing paint and metal, but nothing drastic. All poles are 50", the carbon pole is 265 grams, aluminum is 270, and level 9 fiberglass is 300.

Now I was under the impression that carbon poles are suppose to be lighter than aluminum, so I guess the ones I have must be more glass than carbon eh? Both the aluminum and carbon poles are Atomic racing poles with small basket and carbide tip, though I don't know model year since I bought them both from the clearance pile.
post #2 of 9
Not all carbon poles are equal. Some are heavy, some very light. Sounds like you got heavy. You know the Leki race poles? Carbon and aluminum. Pretty heavy. Some of the Goode and Komperdell carbon poles are VERY light.
post #3 of 9

Expensive aluminum poles are typically quite thin and light.  The carbon % in poles is all over the place.  If you are getting high modulous carbon poles, they will be stronger, absorb vibration really well, and cost more.  If they don't cost (MSRP) at least @$125, don't buy carbon.  

 

Goode has been focusing on carbon stuff forever.  His main market is high-end waterskis, but he sells alpine skis as well. (He bought the old Volant stuff.)  I got some free in 1990.  Seemed good(e)!

post #4 of 9

Top carbon poles are 100% carbon (let's forget now Leki SL poles), and they are a bit lighter then alu poles. But definitely not half lighter. They do have some other positive things next to weight, so those few grams less is not most important thing. But as others said already, if you want good carbon pole, count on $150+ price tag.

post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude 007 View Post
 

Expensive aluminum poles are typically quite thin and light.  The carbon % in poles is all over the place.  If you are getting high modulous carbon poles, they will be stronger, absorb vibration really well, and cost more.  If they don't cost (MSRP) at least @$125, don't buy carbon.  

 

Goode has been focusing on carbon stuff forever.  His main market is high-end waterskis, but he sells alpine skis as well. (He bought the old Volant stuff.)  I got some free in 1990.  Seemed good(e)!

 

Some very dynamic skiers stab the snow with their poles rather vigorously during their short turns.  I watch their hands in videos.  They rebound quickly upward after each pole plant.  I wonder how prevalent carpal tunnel syndrome is for these very capable skiers who are experiencing repetitive high impacts on their wrists.

 

Does the vibration-absorption of the carbon poles help protect those wrists from damage?

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

 

Some very dynamic skiers stab the snow with their poles rather vigorously during their short turns.  I watch their hands in videos.  They rebound quickly upward after each pole plant.  I wonder how prevalent carpal tunnel syndrome is for these very capable skiers who are experiencing repetitive high impacts on their wrists.

 

Does the vibration-absorption of the carbon poles help protect those wrists from damage?

Carbon doesn't absorb shock nearly as well as metal. Springy's not the same as damp. 

 

Also surprised about dynamic skier comment. I was always taught that stabbing the snow throws the balance of the torso off, causes excessive rotation, slows down the next turn, and generally is a bad thing. At most, in bumps we might want a fairly deliberate touch to help rhythm. Has this changed? 

post #7 of 9

Very dynamic skiers, but not very good. Quiet hands, calm hands... stabbers are using their poles to balance rather than for timing. I have a hunch you're seeing WC bumpers that are in fact still 'touching'.

post #8 of 9

 I have expensive Komperdell carbon poles and they are lighter than my aluminum poles, BUT............the big weight difference is in the grips, not really the poles themselves.  If you have chunky cheap grips, carbon won't make a difference in overall weight. 

 

Slim, lightweight grips paired WITH carbon poles = awesomeness.

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
These are the poles in question, top to bottom level 9 fiberglass, aluminum, and carbon. Both atomic poles say "not made according to iso 7331".

8l57.jpg

Really like the aluminum pole, excellent grip and weight feels good in hand and carbide tip holds fast on ice, too bad there's a deep gouge in it and I'm afraid it'll develop a fault line and break unexpectedly.
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