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When is slalom too fast?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hi guys, 

 

I've been re-watching the Whistler 2010 Slalom runs for visual training. However, one thing I notice is that everyone's skiing pretty wild. See here: 

 

 

The difference in speed pops out when I watch Mikaela Shiffin's run here: 

 

So was the course at Whistler too steep for a Slalom event? What would you say the threshold is? 


Edited by Metaphor_ - 12/4/13 at 12:29am
post #2 of 11

Levi is a flat hill and it was girls vs boys ;)

post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Hi guys, 

 

I've been re-watching the Whistler 2010 Slalom runs for visual training. However, one thing I notice is that everyone's skiing pretty wild. See here: 

 

 

So was the course at Whistler too steep for a Slalom event? What would you say the threshold is? 

 

 

Your kidding, right? Do you remember the weather just before the Van Olympic alpine events? Did you notice the light conditions? I'll fill in the blanks from what I recall. It was warm. Very warm. Can't recall if it cooled down, but in any case, course prep must have been a bear. Rough hill, flat light.  You're also comparing the mens SL to the womens. The men are faster even if they might appear more on the ragged edge. You're comparing good weather to bad, and good visibility to poor, men to women.  In a nutshell, no. The whistler hill isn't too steep for SL.

 

Just to be clear, as much as I like watching Marcel H. ski SL, and he's amazing,  IMHO there's no better pure technical skier in SL than Ms. Shiffren.

 

Slope regs... nothing is arbitrary and unmeasured. FIS has a whole book of rules that answer your question.

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

Although weather was warm in Vancouver, it was snowing in Whistler, where SL, GS and DH took place. It does look a bit mushy in the video so probably wasn't much below 0...

 

Actually, I may not be seeing speed so much as how wild and unruly the racers look, e.g. they're having to stivot lots (most?) of their turns on the Whistler course. This doesn't seem to be the case typically. Here's an example of Moelgg(?) and Hirscher looking a lot more refined: 

 

 

 So... why are the racers all looking so wild on the Whistler video? I'm referring to pre-fog; it's understandable when the fog rolled in, but I don't get it outside of that? 

post #5 of 11

Hirscher is pretty wild too...
different set, whistler looks wider, more open, while adelboden looks tighter; ence more straight-line speed in the first one and more carving in the second one.

post #6 of 11
Again, never underestimate what conditions, visibility, and course set can do. The answer is no, it is in no way too steep. Look at videos of solden 2 years ago for tough conditions. Ted crushed the field. Look at Bodi's lake Louis DH for rough and flat. Lake Louis too steep? Probably not. Can a race be cancelled or outcomes effected by weather and set? Absolutely. Unfair? Ask Lindsey. Or Julia M who podiumed the day Lindsey trashed her knee.
Edited by markojp - 12/4/13 at 9:55am
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Hi guys, 

 

I've been re-watching the Whistler 2010 Slalom runs for visual training. However, one thing I notice is that everyone's skiing pretty wild. See here: 

 

 

The difference in speed pops out when I watch Mikaela Shiffin's run here: 

 

So was the course at Whistler too steep for a Slalom event? What would you say the threshold is? 


No.  I don't know what the threshold is, but that ain't it.

 

BTW the temp at Whistler and the snow temp was 0 C, as it says at the beginning of the video.

post #8 of 11
When I'm fully immersed in the skiing experience I always end up with some "wild" moments ... and grins that are all the bigger for it afterward. If I go too long without having any of those, it tells me that I'm trying to snorkel without getting my head wet.
post #9 of 11

You can't really compare men and women skiing. It's simply completely different thing... even on same hill. Even without time you see huge difference when standing on course... hell just listening when they go down makes difference. With men it's like shooting from automatic rifle when they hit gates, while with women you have little bang here and there. And it shows even more when comparing times. Few years ago, Marlies Schild was forerunner in Schladming (and it was far from ice), and she finished some 6 or 8sec (don't remember exact time now) behind first men. Even if it was "just" 6 sec, it's huge gap on 60sec run. And when skiing more then 10% slower, you ski differently, and less "wildly" ;)

post #10 of 11

It might be appropriate at this point to say that momentum plays a large part in the difference in women's and men's race speeds. 

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

It might be appropriate at this point to say that momentum plays a large part in the difference in women's and men's race speeds. 

 

and strength.

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