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Pet Peeve- Inaccurate trail maps... - Page 3

post #61 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by sofort99 View Post


And there's already a problem with people in cars driving into trees, and ditches, and lakes, and off bridges because their GPS said "turn left here". Wait till somebody gets "turn left here"ed off a cliff.

 

 

You don't do irony and tongue in cheek well I take it. :)

post #62 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post


You don't do irony and tongue in cheek well I take it. smile.gif

Half tempted to give a "right back at you!" smile.gif
post #63 of 80

Regardless of the irony, the future is going to be like a museum where everyone has headsets to listen to commentary on the objects.

At the ski mountain, it'll tell you about which way to go, special views, maybe specials at the restaurant,etc. It'll be there, and like museums where it's free, the majority will use it.

So you'll come to an intersection and they'll be a crowd at a trail sign listening to the commentary. (Can't wait to hear the grumbling about the poor commentary done by the mountain causing them to miss a lunch special. :cool)

 

It's coming to a hill near you...

post #64 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

I still don't understand why trail signs aren't color coded or symbol coded for directions and not just trail difficulty. For example, how hard would it for a ski area like Heavenly to put a symbol of a stagecoach or boulder or gondola, etc. on trail signs to signify what base area a skier is heading towards? Many resorts talk about increasing the skier experience, but I guess that "experience" includes getting lost.

 

They used to do color coding at many resorts.  Snowmass comes to mind.  See the big diamonds at the top of the map.  Signs used to be color coded to find you way from area to area (maybe still do in some places?)

 

 

I generally like maps but they're not perfect.  One of the most confusing is below.  They tried to show 360 degree sking by drawing Thunderhead peak twice

post #65 of 80

This is one of my Pet Peeves too!  As others have said, it is something I use more often when I'm at a place for the first time.  I think the worst example I can think of is Winter Park.  I don't know HOW many times we tried to get back to the condo and couldn't find the last trail.  If I recall correctly, there are also two lodges with ALMOST the same name.  That is one of the reasons we will NEVER go back there.

 

I also agree that it would be nice if the flat spots were shown in a different color.  We have friends who snowboard and I know how difficult and "energy zapping" it is when there are lots of flat spots.  If they were shown on a map, they could probably be avoided.

post #66 of 80

One thing I have learned is that people don't read signage.

 

They will be standing right next to the sign that indicates a trail, has an arrow and a degree of difficulty and be asking how to get to that trail and how hard it is.

 

Or my other favorite, "I didn't know it was closed".

post #67 of 80
Is any ski area renaming itself or a trail "Ron Burgundy" even for a day? Seems like a great money maker that could pay for a redesigned trail map.

http://bostonherald.com/entertainment/movies/movie_news/2013/12/ron_burgundy_takes_over_emerson_college
post #68 of 80

I like trail maps (period). Frequently in the summer and fall, I'll pull up trail maps from places I haven't been and think about what it would be like to ski there. I one day will get around to framing (!) the trail maps I've collected and hang them in my house. Every new resort I go to, I collect a trail map. I rarely actually use the trail map, of course, because it's inconvenient to have to pull out a trail map before going downhill and, anyway, I find it easier to scout from the lift and/or ask a local where to go. Also, as Alfred Korzybski once said (wrote?), "the map is not the territory"; it's just a symbol for the territory. A really cool symbol that conveys a sense of place, escape, and exploration. I like trail maps.

 

IMHO, YMMV, etc.

 

o

post #69 of 80

From a locals' standpoint I love the fact that the trail map at my home mountain is terrible.  We have lots of nooks and crannies with great chutes, short hikes and traverses that get you all kinds of great shots, but you'll never find them using the trail map.  In addition, almost all of the good skiing is not obvious from the views you get from the lifts, and if you go exploring there are lots of cliffs.  So people do not go looking for it.  The tourists and occasional skiers leave the goods for the locals.  I for one am very thankful for our crappy trail map.

 

On the other hand, when I am at another area and the ski boot is on the other foot it pisses me off when I have to pay $75+ for a lift ticket and then get a trail map that is fairly useless.

 

Trail Maps are almost always drawings of the area so even the good ones do not give you a good perspective on many of the terrain features.

post #70 of 80
There's a run on the map at Steamboat in the Sunshine area named black powder.

Last years map had it running off Tomahawk, and looping back around to rejoin Baby Powder I think. I never did find it last year.

This year it's not on the main map, but shows up on morningside, but disappears to who knows where.

Not a big deal, but its a bit puzzling.
post #71 of 80

@Finndog what have you to say about your mountain's map?

post #72 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

@Finndog what have you to say about your mountain's map?

 

 

as mentioned above they did issue a new map and there are a few "issues".  Black powder is more of an area really I though that was off the top before you got to sundial?  WX68 is correct, its not there and now shows up on Morningside but where they have it can't be correct.   The main traverse from the T-Head lodge to Sundown is Spur run, that is a little off but not hugely.  There are a couple other issues but nothing major that I noticed so far.  


Edited by Finndog - 12/6/13 at 6:01am
post #73 of 80
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

 WX68 is correct, its not there and now shows up on Morningside but where they have it can't be correct.

Having a run dissapear of the side of the map, with no indication of where it leads is a pretty good one. Maybe you go straight into the wormhole.

On the other hand, I like how Steamboat shows where the morning side trails can be accessed from the frontside map.
post #74 of 80
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanvg View Post



I generally like maps but they're not perfect.  One of the most confusing is below.  They tried to show 360 degree sking by drawing Thunderhead peak twice


That is a mess of a map. It took me several tries of looking at it before I could figure out the relationship there.

I also like how so many Midwest resorts staggeringly exaggerate the vertical relief to make it look like they have actual mountains.
post #75 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post


Having a run dissapear of the side of the map, with no indication of where it leads is a pretty good one. Maybe you go straight into the wormhole.

On the other hand, I like how Steamboat shows where the morning side trails can be accessed from the frontside map.

overall its a good map that is accurate "enough"  

post #76 of 80

Hmm having spent most of my skiing years in Europe in places like the Trois Vallees where you have four valleys,, 183 lifts and 370 miles of runs all interconnected you bet I am used to to carrying and using a piste map.

 

Compared to Europe most US maps are poor and the piste [trail] marking on the slopes is abysmal. You get used to pistes being marked with coloured poles which match the run colour and the poles are numbered.  

post #77 of 80

Decades ago there were certainly more poorly drawn trail maps than in this era.   The most annoying thing to this person was blatantly inaccurate lift verticals that tended to of course fudge towards more.  Here in the Tahoe region there were some lifts with less than 900 feet of vertical that claimed 1000.  Yeah I didn't like the inaccuracy of trail maps but soon solved that issue and have had years of better skiing for it.  Actually poorly drawn maps in our big Western resorts are an advantage to locals and the few like this person because they can hide a lot of the off piste areas.

 

As a twentysomething adult my first outdoor passion was backpacking, a sport where being able to read topographic maps was important, especially since I quickly gravitated towards offtrail adventures.   Then I quickly dove neck deep into skiing and soon was also buying topographic maps of all manner of ski areas.  Not only here in California but also for the big Rocky Mtn resorts.  Even though many trail maps are indeed inaccurate, much can be figured out by comparing topography to the artist drawn maps.  Especially regarding slope gradients and exposures.  Understanding the two have enormous implications for knowing where powder is likely to last longest. The topos also show where denser forest are of course too and I especially love tree skiing.  Usually places only a few locals know.    Thus when I visited places like Aspen, Vail, Snowbird etc I'd already figured out a lot. For instance at Alta or Vail unfamiliar visitors just looking at trail maps are sure to waste a lot of time traversing across areas and get stuck where they really don't want to be because what is and is not possible to traverse is not obvious on the crude maps.

 

Today with online topographic maps and Google Earth far more can be gleaned before visiting resorts the first time but one always will need a trail map as a base to figure things out.

post #78 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post


as mentioned above they did issue a new map and there are a few "issues".  Black powder is more of an area really I though that was off the top before you got to sundial?  WX68 is correct, its not there and now shows up on Morningside but where they have it can't be correct.   The main traverse from the T-Head lodge to Sundown is Spur run, that is a little off but not hugely.  There are a couple other issues but nothing major that I noticed so far.  

Yeah, it's sundial, back to Tomahawk....still don't get it, never saw a sign.
post #79 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post


Yeah, it's sundial, back to Tomahawk....still don't get it, never saw a sign.

 

I skied BLACK POWDER for you yesterday!  The sign is still there.  Its just past this, all deep and untracked yesterday  (now it has my tracks)

 

post #80 of 80
So where does it exit? Are you still in this dimension?smile.gif
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