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Question about waxing

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Ive read on several discussion boards that they wax their skis like everytime or every 2 days or every 3 days they go ski, yet when I took my skis to a professional waxer this season at the start of the season I told him about it and he said I shouldn't worry that the wax should be good for some 10-12 days of skiing, so I can come back then for reapplying.

Now im wondering why would a professional waxer who should know these things and also its in his best interest that I come as many times as I can for extra money tell me I don't need it waxed as often as most ppl seem to be saying if it was wrong? What do you guys think about this?

post #2 of 13

maybe the shop wants you to buy new skis more often.

 

Because it really depends on conditions.  Icy east coast, imo, means more frequent waxing.

 

Of course, when you invest in the equipment to maintain your own equipment, and you almost feel justified to do it more often, to mentally get the ROI in the equipment.

post #3 of 13
I would agree with the 2-3 days statement, well at least in the east.
post #4 of 13
Personally, I use sort of a vertical-adjusted-for-snow method. Every 60000 for our normal snow, edging upwards for light powder, downwards to maybe 40000 for ice and frozen granular. This comes out to different numbers of days depending on all kinds of things. But frankly, no matter how much time they think you spend in the bar, I can't imagine getting even four days of skiing out of a wax job in the East. Maybe they don't want people to freak at the cost of waxing which might happen if they said two.
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

, I can't imagine getting even four days of skiing out of a wax job in the East. Maybe they don't want people to freak at the cost of waxing which might happen if they said two.

 

Exactly. People would think it was a money grab. The question you want to ask your "professional waxer" is how often he waxes his own skis.

 

You also gotta remember that we're all nutcases here. There are lots of people who seem to enjoy eating and drinking, who never get much past an overcooked burger with lots of ketchup and a Coke. Not me, but not wrong, I guess.

post #6 of 13

Do you ski on hard icy granular man made snow or freshly fallen soft snow?

How many miles do you ski in a day?

 

If find every three days works for me, on hard granular snow, skiing fast non-stop from first chair until last run.

post #7 of 13

Agree with Ghost on waxing every third day when skiing firm groomers. At 30 ski days/year, it'd cost you around $150-250 to let the shop do it. yikes! plus what a pain to have to go back to a shop to pick up your skis.

 

Waxing's super easy, and you can save yourself at least $100 in the first year. In later years, you're likely spending maybe $15/year in wax. It's really hard to screw up waxing. Just make sure you get the right tools (waxing iron, plastic scraper, nylon brush) watch a couple of videos, and go for it. Tons of tips here on epicski for waxing, but really, you can do this and save tons of money. 

 

Plus, it's kind of fun to wax. Or maybe that's the fumes talking... 

post #8 of 13

Here's my take.  The video will start at the point.

 

http://youtu.be/50tYjX3hqIE?t=12m

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

 

Exactly. People would think it was a money grab. The question you want to ask your "professional waxer" is how often he waxes his own skis.

 

You also gotta remember that we're all nutcases here. There are lots of people who seem to enjoy eating and drinking, who never get much past an overcooked burger with lots of ketchup and a Coke. Not me, but not wrong, I guess.

 

The professional waxer may be OCD with their equipment because they can probably wax their own equipment for free.

 

one of the mechanics at my local bike shop, used to work at another bike shop which was also a ski shop.  He waxed his skis everyday, because he can (for free) and it was one of the perks of working there.

 

but, you're right, since we can be OCD (and snowboarders tend to be more concerned about fashion than waxing).... if we told a non-OCD about tuning how often you should wax on say... east coast ice....  multiply that by the cost of waxing.... they'd think the shop is trying to rip them off and complain about "overwaxing"

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Agree with Ghost on waxing every third day when skiing firm groomers. At 30 ski days/year, it'd cost you around $150-250 to let the shop do it. yikes! plus what a pain to have to go back to a shop to pick up your skis.



 



Waxing's super easy, and you can save yourself at least $100 in the first year. In later years, you're likely spending maybe $15/year in wax. It's really hard to screw up waxing. Just make sure you get the right tools (waxing iron, plastic scraper, nylon brush) watch a couple of videos, and go for it. Tons of tips here on epicski for waxing, but really, you can do this and save tons of money. 



 



Plus, it's kind of fun to wax. Or maybe that's the fumes talking... 


 



Yep this is pretty much my thought too.

When I go out west for a week of skiing. Its amazing how good the bases look after 6 or 7 days. Back home it's every 3 or 4 days at best.


I do my one tuning so with all the wax I have it's like its cost me nothing but time. The cost is far out weighted by the joy I get from having skis that I know are tuned correctly. I have not had a bad tune since I started doing my own tunes 14 years ago.

I hear people complain about there tunes from different shops a few times a season.
post #11 of 13

@ iLoveskiing

 

How long your wax lasts is all about how durable your wax is, and durability comes from both; 1) the wax adhering to the base and 2) the wax being hard enough to resist the abrasion from the snow crystals. The colder and more aggressive the snow, the harder the glide wax needs to be, but hard waxes do not adhere well to the base, so to only wax hard waxes will result in low durability.

 

Most often a shop will provide a seemingly low cost "wax service", but only apply a low-grade wax with a Wax Jet. Wax Jets are machines that have two rollers, one heated fibertex roller that the tech

will apply (or rub) the wax on to before running the skis over, which applies a thin surface coat of wax to the base, and a second brush-like roller that polishes the wax. It takes just a minute to wax a pair of skis with a wax jet, however, this application method does not provide for a "binder" (a penetrating prep wax) that anchors the glide wax to the base. Without this anchor the wax is easily scrubbed away by the aggressive snow crystals and your results will be mediocre as the durability of the wax job is very low. In essence, you are paying for someone to polish your skis with wax rather than having it applied with an iron so it absorbs into the base.

 

Many shops offer a "hand" wax, which usually means they will use an iron to apply the waxes resulting in a much more durable finish and, if you are not going to hot wax yourself, it is recommended you specifically request a hot-iron applied wax. For maximum wax durability, it is best to first apply a penetrating base prep wax -- which is a soft wax that absorbs into the base -- prior to applying the glide wax. Glide wax is a harder, more abrasion resistant wax that will adhere well to the base prep (aka-binder). Many shops will apply base prep before the glide wax if you make the specific request, it might coast a bit more, but the end result will be much better.

 

The saying goes; soft wax penetrates and "holds on" to the base better than hard wax while hard wax resists abrasion better than soft wax; and hard wax adheres better to soft wax than it does to the base. So for maximum durability first iron in base prep (allow to cool and scrape) then iron in your glide wax (allow to cool and scrape), now your wax job will last much, much longer.

 

Go to:

 

www.dominatorwax.com

 

For more specific details on wax application and, while there, look for the Renew Base Prep waxes as the use of this product is the key to making your wax job last.

 

BTW, even a well waxed ski, saturated with base prep and coated with a quality glide wax (like Zoom or Zoom graphite), will not last 10 -12 days of aggressive skiing (that's crazy talk).

My rule of thumb is to hot wax every two or three full days of skiing.

 

Happy gliding!

 

Tom

post #12 of 13

I've actually tested back to back what Tom just said and he is spot on!

 

It doesn't matter what wax brand it is, applying at least 1 layer, IMO 2=3 is better, of some type of soft base prep, scraping and brushing, then your training/recreational wax after will give you far better results.  I never go more than 3 days, usually it's only 2, before rewaxing.  I will add though, that kids skis because they are much lighter, won't wear out the wax on their skis as fast as adults and you could extend that 2-3 days before waxing but IMO, wax is cheap insurance and provides many more benefits than simply better gliding.  When in doubt, wax, wax, then wax again.  It'll pay you dividends in the long term.

post #13 of 13

I can't express enough the importance of base preparation waxes.  The video will start at the point of "the point".

 

http://youtu.be/YuQpyZC_ziI?t=6m39s

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