or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ask the Boot Guys › Shins and calves are getting beaten up?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Shins and calves are getting beaten up?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I have some Solomon boots that the fitter and I worked quite a while with. I asked for a performance fit. My feet are actually fairly comfortable in the boot. I was wearing the thinest Smartwool sock available and then have been trying some Smartwool socks with a little padding in the shin. Both my shins and back of the calves are getting beaten up. Rubbed raw. I know this is kind of a classic boots are too big and too loose, but I really don't think that's the case. There's no room in the toe box at all and I'm cranking the buckles as tight as I can get them while not even close to them being as tight as possible (e.g., I'm in the middle positions on the buckles). They are also darn near impossible to get off. Any thoughts of what I should be trying here..

post #2 of 12
And your ankle range of motion in dorsiflexion is....................?

Jim
post #3 of 12

add some padding , to the liner, to help fill up the volume that you are missing, that allows the leg to move around and rub you so much?

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by starthaus View Post

And your ankle range of motion in dorsiflexion is....................?

Jim

I certainly don't know in terms of degrees. I have at least some but probably not as much as would be desirable. My calf muscles feel pretty tight. My feet are kind of a mess. I have high, stiff arches, hammer toes, etc. At times I have some metatarsalgia and I had a bit of plantar fasciitis at one point. I don't really feel it's a case of too much volume.

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by RISkier View Post
 

I have some Solomon boots that the fitter and I worked quite a while with. I asked for a performance fit. My feet are actually fairly comfortable in the boot. I was wearing the thinest Smartwool sock available and then have been trying some Smartwool socks with a little padding in the shin. Both my shins and back of the calves are getting beaten up. Rubbed raw. I know this is kind of a classic boots are too big and too loose, but I really don't think that's the case. There's no room in the toe box at all and I'm cranking the buckles as tight as I can get them while not even close to them being as tight as possible (e.g., I'm in the middle positions on the buckles). They are also darn near impossible to get off. Any thoughts of what I should be trying here..

http://www.epicski.com/a/boot-fitting-which-boot-will-work-for-me

 

Humor me----click on and read through the above article about how a boot should fit, specifically the shell fit info and do a shell fit on the boots you now have.

 

Do you have large calves and skinny ankles?

 

mike

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

The boots are CS Falcon Pros size 25/25.5. I typically wear a size 10 shoe. The fitter spent considerable time working with me and did a shell fit. When I do do a shell fit I have about .5" behind my heel with my toes touching the front. He did quite a bit of work opening up the toe box. When I sit my toes are touching the front of the liner. When skiing my heel doesn't move. I do have fairly large calves. I don't think my ankles are especially skinny but probably somewhat relative to my calves. The areas where I'm getting most beat up are lower front ankle, probably 2"-5" above the top of an ordinary sneaker, And then higher on the back, right near the top of the boot. R and L are getting beaten up about equally. My sense is this has gotten worse over time. I've got quite a few days on the boots and think they ski well. It's probably not realistic to try to solicit help for things like this via a forum but thought I'd give it a shot. Could I be over tightening the boots?

post #7 of 12

i think Jim has probably nailed it

 

you say your calf muscle feels tight AND you have a large calf muscle

 

sounds like that combination along with the high degree of forward lean in that boot is using up all your available range of motion and you are then compensating

 

how many day have you got on the boot... the falcon is pretty old now, maybe time for change ;) most of the newer boots are more upright (which will be much better for your calf flexibility and size, you may still need to have the boot adjusted for it though

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

I think I bought them in 2010, probably 70 days. Seems like when they were newer it took 5-6 contiguous days of skiing before I started to have issues. I just skied 2 days and was really beat up. I hate buying boots. Just feel like you're falling into an abyss with a completely unknowable destination.

post #9 of 12

ya,  I'm with the guys here, that the calf issue is to blame?

post #10 of 12

     CEM mentioned that, that boot had a lot of forward lean---I think it was said to have 17 degrees---a ton.  That combined with the size of your calves is pushing your knees forward too far, the result is a sitting back position----your fore/aft balance (COM) are adversely affected by this.  You would get a ton of quad burn from this, until your thighs got into really great shape, being in great shape is a good thing, being off in the fore/aft plane sucks.

 

These boots can be adjusted to a more upright forward lean position and the benefits would astound you, we do it all the time for folks like yourself.  PM me if you want to find out how.

 

Use a tape measure and get back to us with the circumference of you calves at the top of the liner.

 

mike

post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 

Circumference of my right calf is about 15.5" at the top (highest point on the back of the boot) of the boot. would be a little less at the power strap. I'm about 6' tall and weighed 189 at my physical a few weeks ago. I did not know boots could be adjusted to decrease the lean angle. I also didn't know these particular boots had an especially pronounced lean angle. I'm pretty ignorant about the technical aspects of boot geometry and wouldn't really know if I should have more or less lean. I don't think the boots I had before these were a good fit and I got them from a shop with a good reputation. It's a master fit shop and the fitter has appeared in some prominent magazines. My current boots ski considerably better. I'm happy with how they ski. I'd certainly like to try getting them adjusted to be more upright and give that a try before leaping into the mystery of finding new boots. I live in RI, we spend some time in Stowe, we spend some time up around Canon in Northern NH, and I could certainly get to places in MA, or southern NH or Southern VT for boot work. Any recommendations as to how and who might be able try adjusting these, or fitting me for new boots if that doesn't work, would be very welcome. A sincere thanks to all of you for your help!

post #12 of 12

TJSCuffStretcher5.jpg

 

this tool allows us to pull the top of the shells rearward (just crank the handle) and then by heating the sides of the upper shell we can affect the amount of forward lean in the boot.  This does both shells to the same angle at the same time---takes about 20 minutes.  We have developed a sliding graph that tells us how much forward lean a particular size calf will require to allow the skier to extend and still be centered over the boot soles (you would want to be centered when extended wouldn't you?).  I doubt you can extend at the knees/hips and still be centered.  We have been using this tool since 2004 with great results.

 

mike

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ask the Boot Guys
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ask the Boot Guys › Shins and calves are getting beaten up?