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MA request - Page 2

post #31 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
 Were you guys at a CSIA event?

 

Canadian Ski Coach Federation (CSCF) development-level coach training. It's a course to be able to coach 14-16 year-old competitive athletes. Really good course. The CSCF and CSIA are affiliated with each other. 

post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Thanks, that's nice of you. You also skied so much better than your video here. I hope you're a development-level coach now? I was only able to "bring it" for the GS days, so I only passed GS freeski and GS gates. (I actually failed slalom freeski, which I'd previously passed... too little, too late unfortunately.)

For CSIA, the advanced short radius run doesn't need to be as high performance as a slalom turn. Like you said, it's a demo, so if it looks wild, it wouldn't pass. Also, people might be on any kind of ski, not just a slalom ski...  (I was on a softer version of a slalom ski the day of the video, and I may use those skis if I ever do the level 3 exam) They're also grading based on skill demonstrations, so true slalom turns might not enable you to show a blending of all skills. These are just my interpretations, not the official word of CSIA. 

Here's a video of some folks skiing just above a passing mark. Advanced short radius starts at 1:28. Aside from pink pants, most skiers aren't hipping into the turn (poor pink pants), and nobody's wild on the advanced short radius. They're fairly wild in the bumps; the course conductors may have made some accommodation based on the bump size, shape, snow conditions, etc: 




If I were a better skier, I could apply more of the biomechanical principles from the CSCF into my short radius. Hopefully I will now. I think I've knocked off the hip dump anyway, and moved more to turns starting from tipping the boot and using all joints. From there I can start to pick up the speed a bit more. 
Yeah, DL now, just barely. You're definitely headed the right way, your last GS runs were great, no hip and your turns clearly start with the lower leg, the inside ski was well back and good range of motion, very good separation and looked very stable. Cheers!
post #33 of 40
Thread Starter 

Razie, congratulations! 

post #34 of 40
Hey met what did you get for your shorts and intermediate and advanced parallel last year?
post #35 of 40
Thread Starter 

I didn't take the exam yet - waiting until there's some consensus from a couple of instructors that my turns are a 6+. (It's an expensive exam)

post #36 of 40
Yup L 3 is expensive!

I had a go ma you before and I still think it's the same issue. Shorts looking close. The longer turns its the lack of separation at the end of the turn. The issue is at the top of the turn. I think you use your upper body to create or force too much separation at the top leaving you no where to go at the bottom of the turn so your pelvis has to follow and you get stuck in a position where your outside ski loses pressure.

Try reducing the separation at the top and focus on building the platform, stay squarer, once that's nice and strong crank up the steering.

I went to a very cool functional biomechanics workshop and found out there are 5 ways to do internal rotation (pivoting) or any joint movement for that matter. No matter how you do it, as soon as your run out of internal rotation at the hip it has to rotate at the lumbar spine ( which is widely known as rotation for instructors).

Have fun training met. You're on your way.
post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jthski View Post

Yup L 3 is expensive!

I had a go ma you before and I still think it's the same issue. Shorts looking close. The longer turns its the lack of separation at the end of the turn. The issue is at the top of the turn. I think you use your upper body to create or force too much separation at the top leaving you no where to go at the bottom of the turn so your pelvis has to follow and you get stuck in a position where your outside ski loses pressure.

Try reducing the separation at the top and focus on building the platform, stay squarer, once that's nice and strong crank up the steering.

I went to a very cool functional biomechanics workshop and found out there are 5 ways to do internal rotation (pivoting) or any joint movement for that matter. No matter how you do it, as soon as your run out of internal rotation at the hip it has to rotate at the lumbar spine ( which is widely known as rotation for instructors).

Have fun training met. You're on your way.

 

Rotation means rotating the lumbar spine and that is widely known?  Huh? 

EDIT:  After re-reading this I understand better what you are getting at.  I'll just say that if you run out of rotation in the femur and hip, you should already be in the new turn.  So, I guess this makes sense.  You are referring to improper upper body rotation.  My bad. 

 

I thought these were level two maneuvers.

http://www.psia-rm.org/education/alpine/alpine-demonstration-videos/level-ii-skiing?tubepress_video=22271905&tubepress_page=1


Edited by Crud Buster - 12/22/13 at 6:20pm
post #38 of 40
Thread Starter 

Quote:

 

CrudBuster, where's the video of your skiing? 

post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jthski View Post

I went to a very cool functional biomechanics workshop and found out there are 5 ways to do internal rotation (pivoting) or any joint movement for that matter. No matter how you do it, as soon as your run out of internal rotation at the hip it has to rotate at the lumbar spine ( which is widely known as rotation for instructors).

 

jthski, can you tell us a bit more about this biomechanics workshop?  Is it put on by the CSIA/CSCF, or some other organization?

post #40 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrudBuster View Post
 

 

Rotation means rotating the lumbar spine and that is widely known?  Huh? 

EDIT:  After re-reading this I understand better what you are getting at.  I'll just say that if you run out of rotation in the femur and hip, you should already be in the new turn.  So, I guess this makes sense.  You are referring to improper upper body rotation.  My bad. 

 

 

Sorry, kind of hard to write an explanation down and keep it simple.  You are right. Once you are out of internal rotation, (femur on acetabulum ~40 degrees), ligaments bound up and your pelvis has to rotate around, so even if you continue to pivot your pelvis will continue to follow = lack of separation at the end of the turn! 

 

Yes if you run out of IR you should be in the new turn.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by randomstriker View Post
 

 

jthski, can you tell us a bit more about this biomechanics workshop?  Is it put on by the CSIA/CSCF, or some other organization?

 

It was a professional development course for my other work.  I treat and manage musculoskeletal injuries and have an interest in biomechanics and functional movements.  This course looked at functional movements of the lower limb and lumbo-pelvic region and I was able to use the info and apply it to skiing.  Some of the changes that my trainers were trying to get me to do now makes more sense with this extra info.

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