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Rossignol Sin 7 or Experience 98?

Poll Results: Sin 7 or Experience 98?

 
  • 60% (3)
    Sin 7
  • 40% (2)
    Experience 98
5 Total Votes  
post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I'm transitioning back to Alpine after 13 years on tele, and am trying to decide what the best ski for me is.  I've decided decided on Salomon X Max 130 boots and Atomic/Salomon STH 13 bindings.  Here's a little more about me:

 

Height: 6'4"

Weight: 210#

Terrain: I love bumps, steeps, bowls and trees, but do spend a lot of time on groomers with my kids

Skill level: I'd consider myself an expert skier on tele, but don't know on Alpine

 

I'm considering the Sin 7 or the Experience 98, and am leaning a bit towards the Sin 7 right now.  Am I on the right track? Any other recommendations?

post #2 of 8

Those two are about as far apart as it's possible to get within the width category. The Ex 98 is one of the stiffest skis in the category and has quite a bit of metal and a wide, flared tail. Hence the E-98 takes some muscle or some speed to bend it. OTH, you have the size so it wouldn't be too much of an issue at your normal skiing pace. The Sin 7 is quite a bit softer and easier to get flexed in bumps or soft snow. When skiing with the kidz, you'd probably appreciate the fun, nimble feel. Naturally there are tradeoffs and the tradeoff there would be that the Sin might not offer to stability or power that you might want when you are off by yourself.

 

Tradeoffs.....vs. priorities.

 

SH

post #3 of 8

Neither.  Sticking with Rossi's, get the E88 AND a Soul 7.  

 

If you can only have one, go with the E88.  It will be better in the bumps and more fun cruising with the kids.  An E88 will also do well in steeps and trees, just giving up float in pow... which doesn't happen as often as we all would like.

post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies.  If not sticking with Rossi, are there other skis that you'd recommend?

post #5 of 8

Where do you ski?  How long did you alpine before tele?   

post #6 of 8

Consider your style before narrowing down a ski.

 

If you like finishing turns on your tails much like Tele does, the wide flat tails are your target.  

 

If you would rather surf and smear turns, particularly in the steeps and trees, a bit of tail rocker helps this style.

 

The key is knowing the difference, which is hard if you have not skied with your heel down.

 

I'd recommend getting pair with a bit of tip rocker and a flat tail to start, then after a season of feeling your boards work and maybe even demoing some tip/tail rockered boards you might find yourself liking a smeary pivoty turn and next year you can add to the quiver.

 

As it is now, I recommend getting a used or demo pair at a discount and once you get your technique down some new stix will be so much more rewarding.  We all know that dead horse mantra; boots>Lessons>skis.  

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buttinski View Post
 

Consider your style before narrowing down a ski.

 

If you like finishing turns on your tails much like Tele does, the wide flat tails are your target.  

 

If you would rather surf and smear turns, particularly in the steeps and trees, a bit of tail rocker helps this style.

 

The key is knowing the difference, which is hard if you have not skied with your heel down.

 

I'd recommend getting pair with a bit of tip rocker and a flat tail to start, then after a season of feeling your boards work and maybe even demoing some tip/tail rockered boards you might find yourself liking a smeary pivoty turn and next year you can add to the quiver.

 

As it is now, I recommend getting a used or demo pair at a discount and once you get your technique down some new stix will be so much more rewarding.  We all know that dead horse mantra; boots>Lessons>skis.  

 

Good tele skiers don't finish on their tails.  I generally like the same skis for tele and alpine and ski the same kinds of turn sizes and shapes using similar tactics on both alpine and tele.  If anything, I might like my tele skis to be a bit softer than my alpine skis because I'm using a lot more pressure on my inside foot with tele than alpine so my weight tends to not be as outside ski dominant and it's a little harder to bend the skis.

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

Neither.  Sticking with Rossi's, get the E88 AND a Soul 7.  

 

If you can only have one, go with the E88.  It will be better in the bumps and more fun cruising with the kids.  An E88 will also do well in steeps and trees, just giving up float in pow... which doesn't happen as often as we all would like.

 

This is my quiver this year.  I also have E98s and S7s from previous years.  I think the E88 is an incredible ski that will work really well for what you want to do.  You probably want the 186.  I would love to have a second pair mounted with tele bindings.  You will surprised how well the E88 skis in powder.  IMO the E88 is better in powder than the E98 and the E98 has more carving power on hardpack than the E88.  This is not what you would expect from the waist widths alone and is a function of the actual ski construction.  The E98 has two sheets of metal and the E88 has no metal, but uses a Basalt Aramid fiber.  They are very different skis.  I love them both, but find the E88 to be more versatile. 

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