or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › The first time you meet somebody FAST...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The first time you meet somebody FAST...

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
A couple of years ago, I was riding up with a couple probably in their mid 70's. I was going to ski with them, but when they started down our black, they just left their poles dangling from their wrists with their hand in their jacket pockets, stood upright and carried on a conversation with a complete disregard for the run... pretty much the same way my wife and I would ski the bunny slope. I swear... they might as well have been standing in the lift line. I was skiing as hard as I could and couldn't keep up.

I tried to ski with them a few times after that, but decided I was just going to get myself hurt so I quit. It was still fun watching them though. I have no idea who they were, and have never seen them again.

It was a humbling experience, but gave me something to look forward to.

Anybody else ever run into somebody that wound up unexpectedly being just a completely different caliber of skier?
post #2 of 28

What it fast skiing or good fast skiing? 

 

When you say things like, poles dangling from their wrists with their hand in their jacket pockets  It makes me think of someone who has no idea what to do with their poles. 

 

When you say things like,  carried on a conversation with a complete disregard for the run, it makes me think of someone who skis well and is almost bored with it. (I can't imagine being bored with skiing)

post #3 of 28

try skiing on a 300ft slope for 10 years with 20 run choices..

then you'd understand how'd you get bored.

post #4 of 28

Ever notice someone who doesn't look like they're fast, they just cover a lot of territory in a short period of time? Follow Kneale Brownson for example, around Breck for a run or two. That's Good, Fast Skiing.

post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

What it fast skiing or good fast skiing? 

When you say things like, poles dangling from their wrists with their hand in their jacket pockets  It makes me think of someone who has no idea what to do with their poles. 

When you say things like,  carried on a conversation with a complete disregard for the run, it makes me think of someone who skis well and is almost bored with it. (I can't imagine being bored with skiing)

Yeah... you know how you would stand in the lift line with your hands in your pockets and chat with the person standing next to you? This is what they looked like on out hardest run.

I just found it interesting. I consider myself an advanced intermediate, and this was just the first time I ever ran into anybody that skied at a level that seemed like the difference in skill was: them > me = me > a new beginner.

It put things in perspective for me.
post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoal007 View Post
 

try skiing on a 300ft slope for 10 years with 20 run choices..

then you'd understand how'd you get bored.

I skied for 26 years in Michigan, mostly Caberfae and Crystal Mountain.  Its as fun as you make it, no matter where you are. 

post #7 of 28

The 1st time I ever skied Mad River Glen I went with a friend and customer of mine who I had never skied with before. I knew he had skied and he told me of places he had been,he spent a year or 2 out at Jackson Hole but looking at him one wouldn't have expected too much. Oh I was schooled all right. He was going faster in the trees ( not glades) next to side of a run than I could ski faster on the open slope. Thing is he didn't even look like he was working it at all. I on the other hand had all I could do to stay upright on the trail. He introduced me to tree skiing at MRG and am forever grateful. Watching him ski inspired me to get better and more efficient  in my skiing.

post #8 of 28

Two people come to mind. 

 

1. Tom Burawski. When we were seniors in High School, Tom was this scrawny 10th grader brother on one of my buddies. Even at that age, Tom was head & shoulders above anyone in the school it wasn't funny, we all knew that Tommy had the gift. Tom went on to the freestyle tour and eventually was in the Hattrup/Schmidt/Day group that stated skiing the Eagles Nest at Squaw. Tommy had a few Powder Magazine shoots with Hank De Vre along with the coveted cover shot of the September equipment issue. I did get a chance to reconnect with Tom when I moved out here. 

 

2. @iriponsnowI met up with Brian one day at Killington, and his name says it all, he rips. we both took off about the same time in a run but I never seen anyone excellarate as fast as Irip did, within 5 turns, it felt like he was 50 yards ahead of me. I am not a that fast of a skier, but I am not slow either, but he can move. 

 

3. Countless Pro's, there is a reason these guys ski professionally, like I mentioned about Tom above, there are some that just have the gift of ski and being here in Tahoe, it is a pleasure to get out and meet these guys (and ladies) back at the lift. I am just thankful that they (most) wait for us. 

post #9 of 28
I was in mott canyon 3years back and working my down as this is labelled a doubleblack moguled steep. Next to me a guy falls, yardsales and slides the rest of the pitch down. What looks like a 14year old is able to get to and pick up the skis. Throws the skis over his shoulder holding all the poles in his other hand and just smoothly bops down with basically no upper body motion as if he were on a green groomer. Not fast, but i was Impressed
post #10 of 28
Last time I was at Alta I was really moving down a steep semi groomed black run and this guy blew right by me.....skiing backwards! He looked up at me and smiled after he passed me.
post #11 of 28

I hate being a wet blanket but in the name of awareness here goes.

 

Casual speed is not necessarily an indicator of skill.  

 

I see speed hiding technique deficinecies that mean no control while the skier has no reference to that control they do not have.

 

This mentality leads to injuries or collisions.

 

I'm all for responsible speeding, riding under control is the primary responsibility of the skier, then avoiding the downhill rider is possible.  Line choice with awareness of traffic is not easy for even the masters if they are not in control.  When the piste opens up with nobody around ripping is a rewarding exercise that doesn't have the patrollers yelling at you.

post #12 of 28

I got to chase Scotty Flynn down Squaw with the Masters and he rather happy to rip. I decided I better not tell him that  I'm regularly beaten in our club races by 70 year olds:D

post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattL View Post

Last time I was at Alta I was really moving down a steep semi groomed black run and this guy blew right by me.....skiing backwards! He looked up at me and smiled after he passed me.

 

Do bindings release properly in an event for those fellas?  It looks cool and all but is that stupid or just bold?:o

post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buttinski View Post
 

I hate being a wet blanket but in the name of awareness here goes.

 

Casual speed is not necessarily an indicator of skill.  

 

I see speed hiding technique deficinecies that mean no control while the skier has no reference to that control they do not have.

 

This mentality leads to injuries or collisions.

 

I'm all for responsible speeding, riding under control is the primary responsibility of the skier, then avoiding the downhill rider is possible.  Line choice with awareness of traffic is not easy for even the masters if they are not in control.  When the piste opens up with nobody around ripping is a rewarding exercise that doesn't have the patrollers yelling at you.

Wow..I would hate to see what you thought if you really wanted to be a wet blanket? 

 

The idea behind this thread it to talk about skiers that are just head and shoulders above us mortals and to give them some recognition, not Joe Weekend Warrior who is skiing fast for the sake of seeing how fast he goes on his GPS. 

post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buttinski View Post
 

I'm all for responsible speeding, riding under control is the primary responsibility of the skier, then avoiding the downhill rider is possible.

 

Yeah but there's so much gray area these days, maybe it's time for the responsibility code to be updated.

 

:duck:


Edited by Abox - 11/29/13 at 1:22pm
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abox View Post
 

 

Yeah but there's so much gray area these days, maybe it's time for the responsibility code to be updated.

 

:duck:

A skier is either in control or is not, there is no grey just ego. :)

post #17 of 28
Abox was referring to the most recent endless thread about the Red and Grey skiers..
post #18 of 28

I am NOT a fast skier, never have been.  Skied with a lot of people who were fast. Watched the WC racers fly around on warm up days but 1 really does stand out.

 

Stein Erickson about 1972.  Was teaching at Park West now The Canyons.  Erickson was SSD at PCMR and came over to visit us one day with a couple of his guys.  Nobody kept up with the guy.  20 years after his Olympic GS gold he still absolutely ripped, and so smooth.

 

Nobody skied like Stein.    

 

He never wore a hat either, just a little worthless factoid.

post #19 of 28

on a powder day at kirkwood a few years ago i was making my way down sentinel bowl fast ,like a turn every 20 feet or whatever, i stop halfway as i can barely stand and  look up to see this dude launch off the cliffs for 100 plus feet of air and stick the landing and do the whole run in like 4 turns at what must have been 50 mph, i was in awe

post #20 of 28

A friend was skiing one day and rode the chair with an older lady who wondered if he would take a run or two with as she no longer felt comfortable skiing alone. He thought "Oh well I'll humor her for a run". She got off the chair and was gone. After a few holy shits and hanging on as she gracefully flew down the hill he barely caught her at the chair for the next run. That's when he found out he was skiing with Andrea Mead Lawrence.

 

I on the other hand spent 25 years skiing on 350 vertical feet. Since you hit the parking lot before you hit terminal velocity I will never be comfortable with speed the way people who grew up skiing big mountains are. I have a co-worker who is a masters racer and skis very fast. When I first skied with him he would be at the bottom of steeper trails before I was three quarters. Now after years I am happy I can stay with him if I really want to, though I still seldom want to ski that fast. I guess that's why I made a "slow moving skier" triangle for the back of my helmet. 

post #21 of 28

Get to western New Your, ski Holimount with Helluvaskier!

 

Nuff said.

post #22 of 28

1990.  I was at Breckenridge.  My then girlfriend was attending a medical convention, and could not ski before noon.  I went out on my own and met a guy from New Zealand in the "singles lane" of the chairlift on Peak 10.  It was a powder day; about a foot of fresh light powder had fallen overnight.  The NZ guy turned out to be a racer from the NZ alpine WC team, who was out for some free skiing.  Can't remember his name.  He was not famous and was ranked something like 50th in the world at the time.  Bottomline: there were only about 49 other people on the planet who were faster than him.  I spent the morning skiing with him and by noon, I was completely fried.  To this day, that is the best skier I have ever skied with.  

post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

I skied for 26 years in Michigan, mostly Caberfae and Crystal Mountain.  Its as fun as you make it, no matter where you are. 

Hah! I grew up skiing Mt Holly., Pine Knob, and Alpine Valley. Cab and Crystal are MASSIVE compared to those areas. I did ski at Boyne Highlands once and was completely intimidated by the idea that I was supposed to turn.

post #24 of 28

Somewhere around a decade or so ago, I was standing at the top of the halfpipe at a resort in Southern Vermont. I was ready to call my drop when a little blonde girl on a snowboard calls that she's dropping next before I can call it out. I roll my eyes and call 'dropping after'. I figure I'm going to have wait for the kid to get a good ways down the pipe before I drop, and I'm going to have to watch out to make sure I don't run her over if she eats it. Then this girl drops in, and on her first hit she launches at least 10 feet out of the pipe and does an absolutely textbook tail grab... then on second hit tears off a perfect 540. I turned to somebody else standing there and was like "what the fu....!?!". The guy standing next to me goes, "Dude, that's Hannah Teter." Oh. Right. Her.

post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sofort99 View Post


Yeah... you know how you would stand in the lift line with your hands in your pockets and chat with the person standing next to you? This is what they looked like on out hardest run.

I just found it interesting. I consider myself an advanced intermediate, and this was just the first time I ever ran into anybody that skied at a level that seemed like the difference in skill was: them > me = me > a new beginner.

It put things in perspective for me.

 

Perspective changes a lot when you bump into those sort of folks. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

Two people come to mind. 

 

1. Tom Burawski. When we were seniors in High School, Tom was this scrawny 10th grader brother on one of my buddies. Even at that age, Tom was head & shoulders above anyone in the school it wasn't funny, we all knew that Tommy had the gift. Tom went on to the freestyle tour and eventually was in the Hattrup/Schmidt/Day group that stated skiing the Eagles Nest at Squaw. Tommy had a few Powder Magazine shoots with Hank De Vre along with the coveted cover shot of the September equipment issue. I did get a chance to reconnect with Tom when I moved out here. 

 

2. @iriponsnowI met up with Brian one day at Killington, and his name says it all, he rips. we both took off about the same time in a run but I never seen anyone excellarate as fast as Irip did, within 5 turns, it felt like he was 50 yards ahead of me. I am not a that fast of a skier, but I am not slow either, but he can move. 

 

3. Countless Pro's, there is a reason these guys ski professionally, like I mentioned about Tom above, there are some that just have the gift of ski and being here in Tahoe, it is a pleasure to get out and meet these guys (and ladies) back at the lift. I am just thankful that they (most) wait for us. 

We should add @weems to that list. 

At Arapahoe Basin in May, Weems showed up to ski with us and said, " I'm going to take it easy"......If THAT is taking it easy, I'm not sure what I'd do if he opens it up. :eek 

post #26 of 28

Rode up in a tram at Grand Montets with Aurelien Ducorz (2009 and 2011 Freeride World Tour Men's Ski Champion). Didn't see him ski but he looked fast standing in the cabin.

 

Got first tracks in Gunsight at Alta after a 3 foot dump. Climbed up over the ridge from High T to the top of the chute. The top 30 feet was water ice where the snow had slid off from a hand charge. I gingerly sidelipped down to the pow. A blur went by--a skier straightlined it--ice, pow, the whole thing, then cranked a left into the trees of Eagle's Nest. It was my wife, her first day skiing powder, and I didn't see her again until lunch.

post #27 of 28

It was a couple years ago now, but I spent a day skiing up at Burke Mt. in Vermont.  Their race kids were training slalom, so I stood at the bottom to watch.  Two or three kids went and I was thinking "just once, I'd like to make a turn in a race course like they are" and then another kid went...  Now, I'm no instructor, but she was so obviously head-and-shoulders above what anybody else was doing that it wasn't even funny...  i.e., everybody else is racing for second, because she's going to win.

 

I skied away thinking WOW...  I should have skied up to her and asked her what her name was, so I could have said I met her before she became famous.  I'm pretty sure that was Mikaela.

post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
 

It was a couple years ago now, but I spent a day skiing up at Burke Mt. in Vermont....  I'm pretty sure that was Mikaela.

 

That sounds about right. She was crazy to watch train.

 

Burke is covered with a lot of fast, well trained skiers. Helped me learn a lot by watching and trying to follow them.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › The first time you meet somebody FAST...