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New to the site and have some questions about what tools/brands

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thanks in advance for any and all comments.

I have decided to start tuning and waxing our skis and snow boards. We are all recreational skiers/boarders. I have watched several videos to see what equipment is being used. The plan is to work on our equipment only and am looking for tools that will get the job done, last a long time and not break the bank (best bang for the buck) What works for you? (brands, techniques, etc)


1. Bench / vise
2. Side and base edgers, files vs stones differences, multi tool or...
3. Brushes and little square ones vs big ovals
4. All round temp wax (mostly So Cal local mountains)
5 best websites to buy tools
6. Anything else?

Let 'er rip.....Thanks for you time
post #2 of 8
Thread Starter 
Do I need 2 size scrapers (ski and snoboard)? Metal or acrylic?
post #3 of 8

Three years ago I was in the same place in my tuning career as you are today.  You could spend hours (days?, hell I’ve spent years) reading the tuning advice on the epicski site (and if you have the time you should read it too) but quite by accident in the beginning I got directed to Terry at slidewright.com.  Terry supports the epicski site by (periodically) offering special discounts for epic ski members and additional discounts once you achieve some minimal # posts to the site.  However what I found most useful in the beginning is Terry’s willingness to provide one on one advice on everything to do with ski tuning and tools (either by phone or email).  If you want a good place to start (and promise to continue reading all the great tuning advice on epicski) then I recommend checking out Slidewright and sending your question to Terry despite having learned there are many other great suppliers which you’ll eventually get around to using also.

post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I just sent him an email.
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by iajet View Post

Thanks in advance for any and all comments.

I have decided to start tuning and waxing our skis and snow boards. We are all recreational skiers/boarders. I have watched several videos to see what equipment is being used. The plan is to work on our equipment only and am looking for tools that will get the job done, last a long time and not break the bank (best bang for the buck) What works for you? (brands, techniques, etc)


1. Bench / vise
2. Side and base edgers, files vs stones differences, multi tool or...
3. Brushes and little square ones vs big ovals
4. All round temp wax (mostly So Cal local mountains)
5 best websites to buy tools
6. Anything else?

Let 'er rip.....Thanks for you time

1.  I made a thread fairly recently on the bench(/vise)... worth reading

2. Side and base file guides can add up quickly for all the angles you may need.  I have a SKS Multi-angle, base/edge tool.

http://www.racewax.com/p-375-base-side-bevel-file-guide-sks-multi-tool-with-3-dmt-diamond-stones.aspx

3. I use a brash brush, horsehair, & nylon.  I oval ones with a strap is less clumsy to use (at least for me... since I'm a little clumsy)

4. I use the racewax stuff, but a lot of people here, it seems to use Dominator waxes.  You should also get warm temp and/or base prep wax for base cleaning and conditioning.

 

5. I go to Doctor D (racewax.com)...

 

6. Plastic Scraper with a notch, of course an iron (something with a heavy base, seems to work better for snowboards), ptex candles, chemical base cleaner (I use to clean my scrapers and for spot cleaning for some p-tex repair), Metal scraper (for p-tex scraping)...

 

scrapers... I don't like the long scrapers for snowboards, I don't think they are as effective.  I prefer a regular ski scraper, the Swix 4mm scraper I use more (than my 5mm scraper from Racewax).

post #6 of 8

I've learned along the way to to get the best tool and try to get the best deal on that tool while it is on sale.  My first time getting tuning tools I was so ticked at the prices I decided it to use alternative tools.  My brass brush was a brass grill brush from Home Depot and my nylon brush was from a Tack Shop.  It worked and will do in a pinch, but nothing beats using tools made for the job.

 

As mentioned, Dr D and Terry are great.  Artech is worth mentioning too.

 

There is also the wax to choose.  Some folks mix and match and use whatever brand as long as it is the right temp.  I think sticking with "a" brand is the way to go.  Since this is just for recreational purposes, get a wax for that.  Most of the waxes out there are pretty good but the trick is using them appropriately.  I use Dominator and love it.  The first year I used it though, I wasn't happy with the results but a call to Dominator set me straight  (He post here now and again too - Dominator Tom) and I couldn't be happier with the results.  I wasn't following the directions fully and was using the cure time of other waxes for Dominator waxes.  Doesn't work that way.  I was also not paying close enough attention to which wax for which conditions.

 

As long as you get your items from a reputable place, you should be fine with durability.  The best website is the one with the best sale.  Don't for get amazon.com.  I found an item I'm after (not a tool) on amazon being sold for less than any deal I can find through a ski website.  The odd thing is it is from a brick and mortar ski shop by were I work that I deal with frequenlty and it is less than the discount they give me in the shop.  Plus since I have Prime it is free shipping.

 

Have fun.  Right after skiing, this is one of my favorite "me" times.  It's great therapy.

 

 

Ken

post #7 of 8

I've gotten tuning supplies from Slidewright, Racewax, and Artech.  All are good but I've gotten the most from Terry.

 

Vise:  Toko wide assed vise.  Works very well.

 

Hand brushes:  I prefer oval.  I like Swix the best but the Toko and Briko Maplus brushes are also very good. I like to use a coarse bronze, a soft bronze, and a soft nylon.  I also use a stiff steel and a boar's bristle sometimes.  The bronze brushes may actually be either brass or copper, I don't remember.

 

Wax:  For the conditions I ski, I prefer Swix CH6, which I buy in bulk from Artech.  I've also had good luck with Terry's bulk glide wax and it is really cheap.

 

Tools:  I like SVST guides and SkiVision's stones.  I ski mostly soft snow so I'm not wound as tightly about tuning as some.  Terry sells a SkiVision's multi-edge tool that's a good place to start.

post #8 of 8
I felt like L&AirC, pissed that even minimal tools added up quick, but I gave in and spent a grundle of money on waxing and tuning supplies. In general I like using the right tool for the job, so I bought dedicated file guides, good quality diamond files, and the like. And after a bunch of borching about vises I've broken down; I was planning on Toko vises, but now I see that Slidewright carries SkiMan, I might pay a little more for them because they look like they have the widest (e.g. most secure) contact point on the center jaw.

You can also expect a lot of websites to run sales this weekend, but here's what I know at present:

20% off on everything but SVST right now, free shipping over $150.
20% off at Racewax tomorrow (Thanksgiving) and Friday, free 2 day Priority mail shipping over $30. Marc has been responsive to questions.
I hadn't looked at Slidewright, but they've got good prices, and it looks like there's free shipping over $100 or so.

I'm a terrible shopper and am too embarrassed to tell you how much time I've spent checking out every website I could find and carefully comparing prices, so I'd advise not getting too obsessive about it. Fact is, unless you're racing, or are particular about tuning because you used to race, most of the tools sold on any of these sites will work for you. Some are easier, some cheaper, some more convenient; the important thing is that you need to able to make sense of how they work.

If you haven't already, you should watch videos to see how the tools are used. I just found this instructional series on Artech; it's kind of slow, but it introduces each kind of tool, including different brands, so you can see how the work is done. I also like Willie Wiltz's videos, which Tognar embed on their tuning tools pages. You can easily spend hours on YouTube that you should probably spend tuning, though. wink.gif
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › New to the site and have some questions about what tools/brands