or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › First day back - what are your "swing thoughts"?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

First day back - what are your "swing thoughts"?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Just got back from first day on snow. I started with thinking about feeling pressure move from foot to foot, then thinking about making some more space between my legs last run or two I was thinking about keeping my inside hand from falling behind. What about you guys?

post #2 of 20

Keeping hands downhill, not letting my hands drop. Overall keeping a sound upper body. And being mindful I'm not A-framing, a habit I broke a while ago, but needs some refreshing at the start of each season.

post #3 of 20
Rotate the knuckles of my left hand down before impact. Oops wrong sport. Seriously, I am almost relieved golf is over and skiing is starting. With my golf swing I'm pretty much to the point I'm suffering from paralysis by analysis.

I believe for me skiing comes a bit easier but many of you are skiing at a much higher technical level than me and have more entailed movement patterns.

I'm heading out Friday for opening day here, maybe Staying Forward, shins on boot tongues will be my "swing "thought". This has been pretty much what I have been trying to do the last 50 years.
post #4 of 20

Today was also my first day back on snow, new skis and reworked boots. I started by catching my tails, a balance issue. After a while I started to feel the front of my boots and was making smoother turns. By the time I finished I felt like I was linking some smooth turns, I was getting a better feel for the edges engaging and releasing. I will be able to put in a few hours of practice tomorrow before my first on snow clinic Wednesday. I like the new skis, Hart Pulse in 170, I think they'll work. The jury is still out on the boots.

post #5 of 20

It depends. I often don't even know what gear I'll be on until the last minute. For the last few years shuffling and tracer turns have been enough to shake the rust (cough) off. If it's the first day of Pro Jam, my swing thought is usually "maybe I should be in a lower group". If it's opening day at my home resort I don't have time to think about my own skiing.

post #6 of 20

Lot's of one ski skiing, falling leaf pivot slips (a hybrid drill of the two)... just getting balance dialed some. Of course if there's a bunch of deep snow, that's all out the window.

post #7 of 20

I was thinking mostly about pole plant position...  I figured if my pole plant was landing where I wanted it to land and I was swinging only from the wrist, then my hands / arms were probably doing things mostly right.

post #8 of 20

@epic, great thread idea.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

And being mindful I'm not A-framing, a habit I broke a while ago, but needs some refreshing at the start of each season.

 

Suggested drills for this? I could use a couple. Thanks in advance.

 

I got out on Saturday for the first time. Shockingly uncrowded at the River, apart from some kids' race camps from the Eastern Townships. (Bromont, Sutton, and Jay were all there.) 

 

Honestly my biggest problem, which I have noticed becoming a huge issue for me as I age, was vision. It's not my prescription; I just do not have the confidence to blast through mystery terrain in flat light anymore, the way I used to. Maybe it's really a combination of vision + fear. Ideas for coping with this?

post #9 of 20

Working with as flat a ski as I can, trying to find the neutral spot on the skis using as little input ( edge, rotary) as I need to make the size and type of turn I want.

post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
....

I got out on Saturday for the first time. Shockingly uncrowded at the River, apart from some kids' race camps from the Eastern Townships. (Bromont, Sutton, and Jay were all there.) 

 

Honestly my biggest problem, which I have noticed becoming a huge issue for me as I age, was vision. It's not my prescription; I just do not have the confidence to blast through mystery terrain in flat light anymore, the way I used to. Maybe it's really a combination of vision + fear. Ideas for coping with this?

Yellow lenses!  Like, really yellow.    


Edited by LiquidFeet - 11/26/13 at 7:52am
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Suggested drills for this? I could use a couple. Thanks in advance.

I got out on Saturday for the first time. Shockingly uncrowded at the River, apart from some kids' race camps from the Eastern Townships. (Bromont, Sutton, and Jay were all there.) 

Honestly my biggest problem, which I have noticed becoming a huge issue for me as I age, was vision. It's not my prescription; I just do not have the confidence to blast through mystery terrain in flat light anymore, the way I used to. Maybe it's really a combination of vision + fear. Ideas for coping with this?
L
For A-framing, I just try to be mindful of where my inside knee is through my turn. I also try to keep positive pressure on my pinky toe edge of the inside ski.
post #12 of 20

Pretty similar, I am on day 3 & actually felt like I did some real skiing today on a few steep off piste runs.  Before I am even on the hill I try to visualize where my focus was at the end of the previous season & what was working.  Then the first few runs are all about the basics:

 

*Balance & pressure against the outside ski

*Skiing from the feet up

*Level shoulders & a quiet upper body

 

I like to start out on a low angle groomer on SL skis & just make some railer type arcs at slow to moderate speed.  Once I get to where I am not loosing it to the inside I will pick up the speed a bit & play with some different movement patterns.  I like to mix the radius up a bit, some turns with no pole action, some doubles etc.  If I am still getting caught inside, my favorite drill is the pole drag.  I play with stance...  Tall & short, narrow & wide.  After my energy wanes a bit I will ski some "slow as you can go turns" & then some tracer turns & 1 ski railers.

 

Mostly it is just about finding my moving/dynamic balance.  I try not to over think things till after I find my natural swing.

 

JF

post #13 of 20
My first day out, 25 ski days ago, my focus was on moving the inside knee to start turns and feeling the outside arch.
post #14 of 20

   3 days in so far. Tried to touch upon a bit of everything. Did some side slipping, pivot slips, javelins, short/medium radius brushed carves, arc to arc edge locked carves of varying radius, and a handful of lower speed stivots. Worked on extending out with no up, flexing/tipping LTE, and keeping where the pressure underfoot was in the forefront of my mind as much as possible--all on really beat up (and dull) SL rock skis :eek!

 

   Oh, and having fun!!! :)

 

 

   zenny

post #15 of 20

qcanoe get some smith sensor mirror or some oakley high persimmion yellow, both work great in low /flat light areas. I have never had the confindence to blast though flat light so i just use goggles to make it visiable.

 

I usually think about stabilizing my pelvis though core tension.

post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

qcanoe get some smith sensor mirror or some oakley high persimmion yellow, both work great in low /flat light areas. I have never had the confindence to blast though flat light so i just use goggles to make it visiable.

 

I usually think about stabilizing my pelvis though core tension.

While I used to like the Oakley High Yellow, the Smith Sensor has become my flat light lens of choice. I like the fact that I can wear it even if the sun pops through where as the High Yellow felt like to was brining my retinas.

 

As far as what I worked on yesterday, first day out, was trying to keep my left and right turns equal. 

post #17 of 20
Yeah, brined retinas would definitely be bad. Or is that just saline solution? In any case, it works on turkey, in moderation.
post #18 of 20

If you are A-framing, that may be related to alignment, so it may be worth a visit to a trusted boot guru to have your alignment checked and adjusted as needed.  I got new boots this year, and ended up having the gentlemen make some adjustments inside the boot to get me into alignment, along with 1 degree of canting on my left boot (by planing one side of the boot)

 

A cool drill that I use with my students to get them to time their movements together and move each leg more equally is this:

 

Put headlights on your knees.  Visualize that you are driving down a dark and winding country road at night.  You are the only car and headlights on the road, and as you turn in one direction and then in the other, you see both headlights moving in the direction slowly and continuously, and together.  Then they slowly start in the other direction.  Focus on keeping the distance between the knees throughout the turns the same. 

 

This will help with the A-framing, and also make your turns more fluid, as you are not rushing the beginning of the turn.

 

Surfdog

post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

qcanoe get some smith sensor mirror or some oakley high persimmion yellow, both work great in low /flat light areas. I have never had the confindence to blast though flat light so i just use goggles to make it visiable.

 

I usually think about stabilizing my pelvis though core tension.

 

@Josh Matta turned me onto Smith Sensor's a few seasons back...  They work great in the seemingly typically cloudy conditions of the north-east.  The only time I don't like them is on a perfect blue-sky day out west above treeline...  I feel like I'm getting my eyeballs burned off in those conditions.

post #20 of 20

First day work included:

 

- Basic fore-aft balance drills

- Step drills

- Even turns

- Different weight bias on the skis: some turns 100 percent on the outside ski, some 100 percent on the inside, and mixing it up

- Different turn radii (was on my Head SS Magnums, so they worked well for tight GS to fairly tight SL turns)

- Maintaining enough relaxation to not get thrown on chop

- Keeping my shoulders rounded (tougher to do since my shoulder injuries - they go into reflexive "self-preservation" mode)

- Working high edge angles are higher speeds and on the steeps in medium-to-long radius turns

 

...and above all:

 

- having FUN!

- knowing when to call it a day (quality over quantity)

 

I'm recovering from an Achilles injury, so I didn't want to overdo it. I want to keep my dorsiflexion! ;)

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › First day back - what are your "swing thoughts"?