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Why do people never talk about the Northwest? - Page 4

post #91 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by gramboh View Post
 

 

It's possible, but Whistler has had several really bad years in the past decade (e.g. dirt patches at Roundhouse in January). Being so close to the coast means extreme variability in weather. 

 

 

I have a hunch Tony's probably aware of this.

post #92 of 118
Quote:
 It's possible, but Whistler has had several really bad years in the past decade (e.g. dirt patches at Roundhouse in January). Being so close to the coast means extreme variability in weather. I think a lot of Americans coming up for Thanksgiving this weekend are going to be sorely disappointed cramming onto mid-mountain lifts to ski a few groomers with a 65cm base.

You can be skunked anywhere and I doubt you're skunked more in Whistler than anywhere else. (Colorado's been very unkind to me; Utah also has not been generous). I think there were a lot of dirt patches in the Rockies last January. 

 

And those of us that come up for American Thanksgiving (which doesn't seem to be very many of us) know that it's November, and it's always a crapshoot. That's why lift tickets and lodging are discounted. We've come up the last 5 years and conditions have been better than nearly anywhere else, so we're due for a not-so-great November.  This time of year most hotels let you cancel with 48 hours notice, so anyone that looks at the stats and doesn't think it's worth it can bail. I'll have my hiking boots and my dog, so if it really sucks, that's okay. But I don't mind groomers for my first days.

post #93 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post
 

 

 

Don't know about others, but in Seattle, you've got K2 corporate/design/HQ, Lib Tech, Evo, REI HQ, OR HQ, etc...  

SLC/UT has a ton, too. 

 

I'd be more interested to know what towns Shredhead thinks are that much better for industry jobs.

post #94 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post
 

SLC/UT has a ton, too. 

 

I'd be more interested to know what towns Shredhead thinks are that much better for industry jobs.

 

 

I never said there weren't any ski industry jobs in big cities.  It depends on what the OP wants to do in the industry and that's why I asked him.

But most of the Reps I know, do come from ski towns.

post #95 of 118

I didn't say you said that, either. But I think there are certain big cities that are much better for industry jobs than most any ski town, Seattle and SLC being two of the best. Unless you want to spin lifts and give ski lessons, in which case Seattle wouldn't be great. 

post #96 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post
 

 

 

I have a hunch Tony's probably aware of this.

 

I think so, but it's part of my job as the Minister of Whistler Reality to help guide the real skiers of Epicski and other online forums to better destinations (did you hear Jackson Hole was #1 in Ski this year?) and avoid the hype trap that is Whistler Blackcomb.

 

post #97 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by gramboh View Post

 

I think so, but it's part of my job as the Minister of Whistler Reality to help guide the real skiers of Epicski and other online forums to better destinations (did you hear Jackson Hole was #1 in Ski this year?) and avoid the hype trap that is Whistler Blackcomb.

 

 



I hear what your saying, but, is that a big dump of powder right behind you? wink.gif
post #98 of 118
post #99 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
 

 

 

I never said there weren't any ski industry jobs in big cities.  It depends on what the OP wants to do in the industry and that's why I asked him.

But most of the Reps I know, do come from ski towns.

 

 

'cept the ones based in Seattle, Bellingham, Portland... ok... Hood River isn't really a ski town, but it's a great place, etc... wait a minute! Maybe they ARE ski towns. :)

post #100 of 118

2004-05 was the only season in recent memory that could be defined as bad by most people's standards.  Can Whistler's weather be difficult? Sure.  But in terms of adequate snow coverage and open terrain it's top tier in reliability.

 

Since 1996-97 Whistler has averaged 75% open mid-December (similar to Snowbird, Steamboat and Vail). At Christmas Whistler has averaged 87% open with only one season below 50% and another 3 below 75%.

 

Jackson during the same time period averages 56% open mid-December and 85% open at Christmas with 2 seasons under 50% and another 2 under 75%.

 

This November has shown a widespread pattern of being distinctly below average in the coastal areas of the West and in many case much above average in interior locations.  If you're making the call now where to ski during the next month, no question Jackson is a very attractive choice and Whistler not so much.  But this is the exception for early season, not the rule.

 

Whistler can be a busy place. Perhaps gramboh would like to make it a bit less so.:rolleyes 

post #101 of 118

IMHO the cascades are the best mountais in the lower 48. I'm not talking inbounds terrain. 

post #102 of 118
They're right up there, but IMHO the Elks and San Juans in CO are the two most incredible ranges in the lower 48 both for skiing and more importantly scenery
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfacehoar View Post

IMHO the cascades are the best mountais in the lower 48. I'm not talking inbounds terrain. 
post #103 of 118

If you really want the most beautiful scenery you have to cross the border to Yoho and Banff where real mountains actually are. 

post #104 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by noncrazycanuck View Post
 

If you really want the most beautiful scenery you have to cross the border to Yoho and Banff where real mountains actually are.

 

Uh oh...........and it begins.....  Here we go.....

post #105 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by noncrazycanuck View Post
 

If you really want the most beautiful scenery you have to cross the border to Yoho and Banff where real mountains actually are. 

ABSOLUTELY!  Everyone should go there instead of the Cascades.  :cool 

 

Canadian Rockies are a very special place.  

 

If you have the opportunity in WA to ever travel over The North Cascade Highway, do it.  There is a nearly ignored North Cascade National Park that has scenery that rivals Glacier.  It is closed in the winter though so summer trip.  Well worth a couple days of your life.

 

Okay, back to the fights.  :duel:

post #106 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post
 

 

 

Whistler as a comparison: 

 

 

I'd also add that Whistler gets badmouthed something rotten by Brits who've splurged on the long haul dream vacation and then got skunked by a week of rain from mid mountain down and a closed alpine.  In the long run it balances out but as a one-off "big trip" it can still be bit a lottery.

post #107 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

 

If you have the opportunity in WA to ever travel over The North Cascade Highway, do it.  There is a nearly ignored North Cascade National Park that has scenery that rivals Glacier.  It is closed in the winter though so summer trip.  Well worth a couple days of your life.

Unfortunately, the Highway is closed in the winter, but if you have a clear day, head to Mt. Baker and you'll see enough of the North Cascades NP to make your jaw drop and your eyes bug out.  It is serious competition for the Canadian Rockies, different, but breathtaking as well.

post #108 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by wasatchwarrior View Post

They're right up there, but IMHO the Elks and San Juans in CO are the two most incredible ranges in the lower 48 both for skiing and more importantly scenery

The Elks and the San Juan's are amazing, but the amount of snow and especially the stability of that snow can be shit. I think there is a lot to be said for mountains that get a ton of nice wet snow to make a (generally) more stable snowpack than CO.
post #109 of 118

North Cascades Highway is certainly the prettiest route thru the Cascades. It is also a great cycling road in spring before it opens.    

post #110 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

 

If you have the opportunity in WA to ever travel over The North Cascade Highway, do it.  There is a nearly ignored North Cascade National Park that has scenery that rivals Glacier.  It is closed in the winter though so summer trip.  Well worth a couple days of your life.

Unfortunately, the Highway is closed in the winter, but if you have a clear day, head to Mt. Baker and you'll see enough of the North Cascades NP to make your jaw drop and your eyes bug out.  It is serious competition for the Canadian Rockies, different, but breathtaking as well.


Baker is pretty - back when Whistler was an ugly clear cut valley we always liked going to Baker for the better views

post #111 of 118

Last year we went to Utah for a trip and they had way less snow than we did on Hood. A friend ripped up his skis in Colorado last year, and Tahoe had a bad year, on Hood we had a decent year with some good powder days. If I was rich I would just follow the snow.

post #112 of 118
Quote:
The Elks and the San Juan's are amazing, but the amount of snow and especially the stability of that snow can be shit. I think there is a lot to be said for mountains that get a ton of nice wet snow to make a (generally) more stable snowpack than CO. 

For those who emphasize the backcountry this is very true.  I have heard of skiers who moved from Colorado to the Sierra for that reason.

post #113 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 

The Cascades are a great place to live and ski.  They are not a great place to visit and ski.

 

That is a pretty good summary. If, as I do, you use PNW skiing in the US roughly to mean skiing the WA Cascade Crest, there is no really convenient way to do anything resembling resort skiing ala CO, UT, or California. Everything is, for all practical purposes, day use hills. And that is why PNW is so little talked about. Why spend tens of millions marketing to hundreds of thousands or millions of out of town, or out of country, skiers when you have no beds or services for them?

 

As for the skiing, I'll only post this because the local lack of lodging is - at least for the moment - the PNW's best defense from being overrun with too many visitors. I know there is the whole "Cascade Concrete" thing in the public mind. But I don't get it. Most years, that seems a now and again thing - and as far as I can tell, most years the PNW's number of "really good days" snow-wise crushes most places other than the cottonwoods.

 

The main thing missing here in WA is lift served vert - nothing like JH or the Bird which certainly rock.  We have to take our vertical in smaller bites. OTOH, for my .02, the terrain quality and snow are tough to beat.  IMO nice maritime snow is vastly superior to insubstantial continental fluff that sticks to nothing and blows off everything with the lightest of breezes. I'm not saying that fluff is all you can get in the Rockies - but there are lots of places that see lots of that kind of snow. So to Tony's comments - based on my experience, you have lots of access from SLC, but only a small number of UT areas are really up there with the PNW in terms of snow quantity/quality (again, to my tastes). Though, as noted, we do have to drive a bit more.

 

Somehow, though, we manage to make do with only a couple dozen lift served days a year like this...

 

 

 

 

 

DSCN0615 (1).jpg

 

 

 

Yeah, there's a skier in that white room if you look hard enough....

 

1000

 

(OK, I admit it, one of those required a few minutes of boot packing - but except for being lazy, I could dredge up a bunch more similar shots right off the lifts... Oh, and you may have noticed that most of our best skiing is not exactly on bluebird days....)

post #114 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
 

 

 

 

 

 

Ummmm.

 

Yeah.

post #115 of 118

post #116 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
 

At the base you may be here :D

2006768976

Some things don't change all that much over time.

post #117 of 118

HAHAHAHAHAHA........

post #118 of 118

Check the dates!
 

 

 

Top to bottom.  It don't rain much in the high desert!

 

100_5867.JPG

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