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Toe Bang...

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Ok, so I've had a set of Nordica Speedmachine boots- this is their 5th season and about 180 days of skiing.  Coming into this year, I knew the liners were well past packed out, and at the beginning of this year bought a new takeout pair of Tecnica Demon liners to replace. Shell fit in the boots, I have about an index finger of room at the heel.

 

The liners did their job and made the boots feel like new again, and after the 1-2 days, the fit was spot on. DEFINITELY less space- with the original liners I could lift my heel and I could wiggle my toes a lot more.

 

However, I'm 7 days in and have some pretty good toe bang going on- deep bruises under the toenail and a blister on the front of one foot. I have NEVER had this before with these boots.

 

I am 99.9% sure these boots have less space in them with the liners, including in the toebox.

 

My understanding is that toe bang is usually caused by loose boots, but I don't think that is what is going on...

 

Could too little space coupled with impacts be causing the issue? I've been having some great powder days early season, but part of the caveat is that gullies and steep-to-flat stuff isn't filled in or packed to moderate the transition. I've had plenty of encounters with crossing surprise stream gullies where I am cranking back and getting slammed a bit coming back up the opposite bank, as well as steep-to flat transitions. I suspect I am slamming my toes a bit from this.

 

I don't feel any pain while skiing, which makes it tough to figure out when the problem is happening.

post #2 of 12

It sounds to me that your boot does not have the toe room you need, or the boot does not snug up enough around the 2nd and 3rd buckle and you are getting some float in them. Most people bang their toes from sitting back too much, but from your post I would say that is not your case.

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomfifield View Post

It sounds to me that your boot does not have the toe room you need, or the boot does not snug up enough around the 2nd and 3rd buckle and you are getting some float in them. Most people bang their toes from sitting back too much, but from your post I would say that is not your case.

A lot of the impacts I mentioned involve me cranking back on the heels to get the tips up far enough to clear the surprise obstacle. I don't try to ski backseat, but I think the toe bang could be explained by that.

Snow conditions have been so good this year that I have been skiing mostly off piste in the early season.
post #4 of 12

Cut those toe nails short and lean into the shins.  Beyond that, I guess you could get the toe punched out a bit.

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post

Cut those toe nails short and lean into the shins.  Beyond that, I guess you could get the toe punched out a bit.

Nails are short. I do get into the shins, but when you find a fallen tree just in front of you that you need to hop, leaning into the shins is going to end ugly.
post #6 of 12

Maybe wait until you have 5 more feet of snow;)

post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post
 

Maybe wait until you have 5 more feet of snow;)

 

Hey, I want to get this squared away now, not next week. ;)

post #8 of 12
what about width? Volume over instep?
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

what about width? Volume over instep?

 

The boot's tightest fit is at the instep. The instep buckle (2nd closest to toes just to be clear) I just snug instead of clamp as my feet tend to go asleep if I click it in with even enough force to hold the buckle- this is the same with the new liner as the old.

 

The boots were punched a few mm at the 1st knuckle/widest area of the foot. I have very wide feet. It occurs to me that getting punched there could allow the feet to move forward when thumped.

post #10 of 12

I have the same boot, same problem.  All I have done to prevent it is make a mental note to keep my toes relaxed and down.  It works for me.  I noticed when I was having problems that my toes were high and tensed regardless of stance.

post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowfan View Post
 

I have the same boot, same problem.  All I have done to prevent it is make a mental note to keep my toes relaxed and down.  It works for me.  I noticed when I was having problems that my toes were high and tensed regardless of stance.

 

Good advice. I bet I'm lifting my toes trying to close up the ankle in the moment right before impact.

post #12 of 12

Haven't looked in a speedmachine shell, but most (not all) of their current boots have a pretty cavernous heel pocket... more like a heel divot. I'd imagine for anyone with a narrow'ish heel and well defined ankle might have trouble with things sliding around after a while.

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