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What skis can you rcommend to an intermediate looking for All-Mountain Skis? [New Zealand] - Page 2

post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daza152 View Post
 

No that's another mine field, I know they say that boots are more important than skis, and rightly so. I am hoping to score me some skis with bindings for around $700 and boots for $400...so wish me luck.

Reverse the spend - $700 (min) on boots and then you're in business. Boots you will keep for a long time, skis not so much.

post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2meke View Post
 

Reverse the spend - $700 (min) on boots and then you're in business. Boots you will keep for a long time, skis not so much.

This (including going to a good boot-fitter and getting some good ski socks if you haven't already. 

 

I'd also consider investing in some lessons (earlybird and late privates are pretty reasonable) you might be surprised at how helpful skiing with someone who can objectively look at your skiing can be and it might give you some insight into what skis to look for. Skis will help you to an extent, but they aren't really a substitute for technique. Also, buy the ski that suits what you ski, not what you wish you were skiing. If you are going to be skiing mainly North Island NZ, then a fat powder ski might not be what you want. NZ snow isn't the powder that you get in West Coast US or Canada, so a ski optimised for those conditions might disappoint.

 

If you do decide to buy before the season starts then around May/June is usually about the best time, when shops are clearing out their last years stock. If you're going to demo first, bear in mind that you will be demoing 2015 gear - ski gear is about the only thing that is released in NZ before the northern hemisphere.

post #33 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Kiwi View Post
 

This (including going to a good boot-fitter and getting some good ski socks if you haven't already. 

 

I'd also consider investing in some lessons (earlybird and late privates are pretty reasonable) you might be surprised at how helpful skiing with someone who can objectively look at your skiing can be and it might give you some insight into what skis to look for. Skis will help you to an extent, but they aren't really a substitute for technique. Also, buy the ski that suits what you ski, not what you wish you were skiing. If you are going to be skiing mainly North Island NZ, then a fat powder ski might not be what you want. NZ snow isn't the powder that you get in West Coast US or Canada, so a ski optimised for those conditions might disappoint.

 

If you do decide to buy before the season starts then around May/June is usually about the best time, when shops are clearing out their last years stock. If you're going to demo first, bear in mind that you will be demoing 2015 gear - ski gear is about the only thing that is released in NZ before the northern hemisphere.


Hi thanks for advice, I will be skiing mainly the nth Is. at Whakapapa and a bit at Turoa (never been yet). 60% groomers and some off piste too so I will hopefully get a pair of 2014 line prophet 98's I can't see myself going wrong with them? will try not demo some skis and probably will be the 2014 stuff then, which is funny cause that is so 2013 stuff Lol. weird. as for lessons I am too stubborn to take any as I can ski well and get better every day so I like doing that way, that's just me.

post #34 of 50

Ski Kiwi is spot on, new skis will only get you so far, spend the time and $s developing your technique. The Line 98 isn't probably the best ski for you at this time and for where you ski. 

post #35 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2meke View Post
 

Ski Kiwi is spot on, new skis will only get you so far, spend the time and $s developing your technique. The Line 98 isn't probably the best ski for you at this time and for where you ski. 


Thanks maybe I will look into the lesson thing never had any yet, but I guess it couldn't hurt, as for the prophet 98's why do say they probably aren't right for me now? I am a level 6 if that helps. Cheers.

post #36 of 50

Probably too wide for about 90% of the time at Ruapehu. You want a ski that is quicker edge to edge for most of the terrain you will be on for most of the time (groomers+ice). I've made the mistake of getting a too advanced ski, getting ahead of myself because I spent too long on this forum and didn't really appreciate what level I was truly at. Learn to turn first, otherwise you will be heel pushing all over the hill and struggle to advance. 

post #37 of 50
Thread Starter 
Learn to turn first?? I find that a little insulting, I can turn very well already. I do however take the advice of the narrower ski so maybe the rossignol experience 88?
post #38 of 50
Daza, you are a moving target as far as giving advice goes:)

From predominately off trail powder to a60/40 ski. i retract my advice regarding width of ski but still think you should be on 180+ length in a modern ( twin/tip tail ruse, etc.)

Based on what I've gleaned from this thread, I would reach in to my cupboard and for a carton of beer would give you my old Head Monster 77's. I would want my bindings back eventually.

I would then send you off to the boot fitter.

I would then sit you down, look you in the eye and say " Daz, youre a keen and enthusiastic lower intermediate. ". You would look a bit shocked:eek and tell me about the level chart that you have read. "I'm a level 6" you would reply.

I would reply " Mate, you have bashed around your local hill without lessons on a pair of 151cm rental skis. I would be scared to be on the same trail"

You would say "Dude, thats harsh" and I would say "Mate, I'm not being critical, I'm being constructive"

Youre ego will be a bit deflated but hopefully this little metaphorical slap around the chops will clear your head.

With your head now cleared you would take all the money you saved by not buying expensive high end skis too early in your development and spend it on some lessons. As mentioned, early bird privates can be had relatively cheaply but I have had some good group lessons back in the day.

Summary
1.0 decent comfortable boots
2.0 lessons. Good oppurtunity to seek advice from your instructor.
3.0 score some decent used skis based on instructors advice for the season and demo whenever you can.
4.0 start skiing st your local club field. Become a member.
5.0 Keep an eye out for end of season deals on whatever dream ski you decide upon

6.0 Maintain that enthusiasm
7.0 grab some mates and do a skifari to the south island clubbies
8.0 Ski the planet
post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2meke View Post

Probably too wide for about 90% of the time at Ruapehu. You want a ski that is quicker edge to edge for most of the terrain you will be on for most of the time (groomers+ice). I've made the mistake of getting a too advanced ski, getting ahead of myself because I spent too long on this forum and didn't really appreciate what level I was truly at. Learn to turn first, otherwise you will be heel pushing all over the hill and struggle to advance. 

Sage advice from somebody who has gone through the process that many have.

Don't be insulted, be enlightened young Jedi
post #40 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigr View Post

Daza, you are a moving target as far as giving advice goes:)

From predominately off trail powder to a60/40 ski. i retract my advice regarding width of ski but still think you should be on 180+ length in a modern ( twin/tip tail ruse, etc.)

Based on what I've gleaned from this thread, I would reach in to my cupboard and for a carton of beer would give you my old Head Monster 77's. I would want my bindings back eventually.

I would then send you off to the boot fitter.

I would then sit you down, look you in the eye and say " Daz, youre a keen and enthusiastic lower intermediate. ". You would look a bit shocked:eek and tell me about the level chart that you have read. "I'm a level 6" you would reply.

I would reply " Mate, you have bashed around your local hill without lessons on a pair of 151cm rental skis. I would be scared to be on the same trail"

You would say "Dude, thats harsh" and I would say "Mate, I'm not being critical, I'm being constructive"

Youre ego will be a bit deflated but hopefully this little metaphorical slap around the chops will clear your head.

With your head now cleared you would take all the money you saved by not buying expensive high end skis too early in your development and spend it on some lessons. As mentioned, early bird privates can be had relatively cheaply but I have had some good group lessons back in the day.

Summary
1.0 decent comfortable boots
2.0 lessons. Good oppurtunity to seek advice from your instructor.
3.0 score some decent used skis based on instructors advice for the season and demo whenever you can.
4.0 start skiing st your local club field. Become a member.
5.0 Keep an eye out for end of season deals on whatever dream ski you decide upon

6.0 Maintain that enthusiasm
7.0 grab some mates and do a skifari to the south island clubbies
8.0 Ski the planet


Dam! I hate hearing the truth cause it hurts so much. Ok you make some very valid points, do intermediates get lessons?  I guess they do, but are you saying unless I do I won't become a very good skier? Your right about the gear, and I know Boots first skis second, the guy up in Whakapapa can sort me out with all the right gear and advice on lessons too. Cheers I needed that.

post #41 of 50
Thread Starter 

Do you want my address? Lol. ~~"would give you my old Head Monster 77's" :bs:(not the "I recommend 180+ cm") but better than the 151 cm rentals....Can I ask you a question will I honestly find skiing on longer than the 151 cm difficult to turn now I skied those last time up the mountain?? Seriously or will I get used to size I am suppose to on pretty quick taking into account I am a super quick learner...:words: 

 

Cheers mate how's the carton going? on your next one yet? Haha.

 

Daz.

post #42 of 50
Thread Starter 

and I think those 151 cm long skis were 76 cm underfoot too.

post #43 of 50
Daz, your a good sport. smile.gif

Your local club field http://www.tukino.co.nz

Private lessons, $60- group lessons $35.

NZ clubbies are awesome

Having a browse through trademe and found this setup
http://www.trademe.co.nz/sports/ski-board/skis/171-180cm/auction-662729157.htm

I would be all over this like a rash.
Legend 8800 was/is a great ski. 178 in length but its a fully cambered ski so similiar running length as a longer ski with rocker/rise.
You could use the fritschis for downhill or sell them and the skins to fund some one way bindings.
Edited by craigr - 11/23/13 at 6:10pm
post #44 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daza152 View Post
 


Dam! I hate hearing the truth cause it hurts so much. Ok you make some very valid points, do intermediates get lessons?  I guess they do, but are you saying unless I do I won't become a very good skier? Your right about the gear, and I know Boots first skis second, the guy up in Whakapapa can sort me out with all the right gear and advice on lessons too. Cheers I needed that.

 

Daza, just tossing it out there, but I can't think of one single exception in the professional ski world of an athlete that hasn't had a good deal of coaching at some point in their life, and probably much more than you'd ever imagine. So yes, as an intermediate, you could benefit hugely from some coaching. Do you have to? No. Will you get better without? Sure. Will you be anywhere near as good over the long haul without it? No. Pick your goal, do what you need to get there (maybe lessons, maybe not as appropriate), and call it good.

post #45 of 50
Mileage helps a lot as well.
post #46 of 50
Thread Starter 

Hmmmm. plenty to contemplate as in what I want to get out of it.....Hey sure do we want to be like Shane McConkey Hell Yeah!! but will we really? ah na. probably not. So where does that leave me?? well realistically what I would love to get out of skiing is eventually skiing deep powder snow and small jumps with 100% confidence, that is what I would love to do sure. How do I get there? Here is an analogy guys like Eric Clapton probably never had guitar lessons!!! think about that one.......:cool

post #47 of 50
Thread Starter 

How do you decide where you want your skiing to take you? I am just guessing but surely everyone would want to be as good as you can be? maybe goals change maybe you should set smaller realistic obtainable goals, then move the goal post each time as you improve? Can you do jumps small or big? did you ever think you could? Just a thought

post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daza152 View Post
 

Do you want my address? Lol. ~~"would give you my old Head Monster 77's" :bs:(not the "I recommend 180+ cm") but better than the 151 cm rentals....Can I ask you a question will I honestly find skiing on longer than the 151 cm difficult to turn now I skied those last time up the mountain?? Seriously or will I get used to size I am suppose to on pretty quick taking into account I am a super quick learner...:words: 

 

Cheers mate how's the carton going? on your next one yet? Haha.

 

Daz.

 

Hell yeah you will find longer skis that are not rentals harder to turn, and they'll be faster. Most rentals are noodles; soft and designed to turn and I would hazard a guess that the edges are pretty dull too (can't speak from experience, I've never skied on standard rentals). But 151 is ridiculously short for someone of your size. Rentals are like a 1000cc automatic shopping trolley for nanas, and you're stepping up to a high powered and speced SUV - some adaptation is required.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daza152 View Post
 

Hmmmm. plenty to contemplate as in what I want to get out of it.....Hey sure do we want to be like Shane McConkey Hell Yeah!! but will we really? ah na. probably not. So where does that leave me?? well realistically what I would love to get out of skiing is eventually skiing deep powder snow and small jumps with 100% confidence, that is what I would love to do sure. How do I get there? Here is an analogy guys like Eric Clapton probably never had guitar lessons!!! think about that one.......:cool

Your expectations are realistic, and with coaching/lessons combined with some mileage you will get there sooner than you think (small jumps, confident in powder next season)- BUT, you will have to go off-shore (Japan, North America) to really experience powder. The good news about that is that it is surprisingly cost effective (you can get a weeks skiing in the US, Canada or Japan, including airfares and transfers for under $3k depending on how basic you want to go on accomodation, but it is addictive), and if you learn to ski NZ "powder" certainly North American powder is like skiing on air.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daza152 View Post
 

How do you decide where you want your skiing to take you? I am just guessing but surely everyone would want to be as good as you can be? maybe goals change maybe you should set smaller realistic obtainable goals, then move the goal post each time as you improve? Can you do jumps small or big? did you ever think you could? Just a thought

 

 

It changes as you go. Surprisingly not everyone wants to be as good as they can be, (not the camp I fall into). Once you start the goal posts will move continuously, but it is a great feeling when you nail something. Yes I can do jumps, but it is not something that I chose to do, and no I didn't ever think that I couldn't but I learnt to ski as a child.

post #49 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Kiwi View Post
 

 

Your expectations are realistic, and with coaching/lessons combined with some mileage you will get there sooner than you think (small jumps, confident in powder next season)- BUT, you will have to go off-shore (Japan, North America) to really experience powder. The good news about that is that it is surprisingly cost effective (you can get a weeks skiing in the US, Canada or Japan, including airfares and transfers for under $3k depending on how basic you want to go on accomodation, but it is addictive), and if you learn to ski NZ "powder" certainly North American powder is like skiing on air.

 

 

It changes as you go. Surprisingly not everyone wants to be as good as they can be, (not the camp I fall into). Once you start the goal posts will move continuously, but it is a great feeling when you nail something. Yes I can do jumps, but it is not something that I chose to do, and no I didn't ever think that I couldn't but I learnt to ski as a child.


I am honestly a little concerned about the new length I'll be on and will post how that goes, and with that in mind if I were to try "~~ high powered and speced SUV" go for a demo on a 177-179 cm rather than the 186's? (or stuff grab as much gear to try as possible) I would love to ski Japan looks incredible! but being a family man with young children don't see that happening for me anytime soon. I will just have to find great Kiwi Powder somewhere.....I have relies I will stay with in 2015 that live next to Queenstown:) may I ask how old you are now?

post #50 of 50

If we're being realistic, unless you live in the snowfields (or snow towns) you'll have to ski whatever conditions you find on the day, and powder days are the exception rather than the rule.  If you can time your trips to coincide with snowfalls more power to you; I'm jealous.

 

Was I you I would look for a versatile ski with some early rise and a waist in the high-80s.  I would want it to be entertaining on piste, to be able to hold an edge on a refrozen morning groomer, and to deal reasonably well with heavy crud.  That ski is certainly not a deep powder ski.  Still, a ski with those traits would be fine with most realistic depths of new powder.  At your size the high-170s would be fine for a flat tailed ski, and you could go longer again for a twin tip.  Yes, the extra length will feel different at first, but you'll quickly get used to it and be a better skier for the change.  I'm 6'4" and 210lbs and, with a ski like the Rossi E88, I'm sort of in between the 178 and 186.  I'm happy skiing both lengths, but would opt for the shorter ski on our crowded local hill, and the longer ski overseas.  I would happily put you on the 178; it's a great ski that will work in a lot of conditions.

 

I'm sure it's been mentioned, but boots are the most important thing.  It's worth spending good money to get properly-fitted boots, even if you have to cut into your ski budget.  Lessons are the best way to improve your skiing.  One of the best skiers I know swears by at least one private lesson each season.  Bad habits tend to creep into your skiing, and he finds himself removing those habits to get back to his A game.

 

Best of luck.

 

[edit - just thinking about this a bit more ... if you're only ever looking to ski when there's new snow, and are looking to get off piste at the NZ club fields, you could/should target a versatile powder-oriented ski.  Under those circumstances you could do a lot worse than looking at Rossi's Soul 7.  Also, if you're prepared to hike for some powder turns it's a whole new discussion.  I'm talking about lift-accessed terrain here.]


Edited by sinbad7 - 11/24/13 at 4:23pm
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