or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Wax buildup on tips and tails

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

So I've started doing my own tuning, and haven't had any problems with base repair or edges, but when waxing and scraping, I'm having a difficult time getting a good finish across the tips and tails. When I scrape I get wax buildup that doesn't come off smoothly... it seems the scraper skips or jumps when I get to those sections.I initially thought it was the scraper, so I jury rigged a sharpener with some right-angle steel and drywall screens and tried it again. Same thing. New scraper? Same thing.

 

So I guess the real question is how good do the tips/tails have to be? Is there a trick to getting a good finish across the entire length of the ski?

post #2 of 20
Is it that they are not supported firmly? Just slow down when you get there, sounds like either a support or technique issue, but unless you're using a metal scraper, the only thing that matters is to get the excess wax off so you can brush it.

Not that those areas are really crucial, depending on the terrain, wax could be there all season.

I expended a LOT of elbow grease brushing before I had rotobrushes.
post #3 of 20
Sounds like you may be experiencing pretty common--concavities at the tip and tail (the center portion(s) are lower than the edges). So when you scrape as normal with a flat scraper it leaves wax behind in these areas. Does this sound familiar?

zenny
post #4 of 20
I have a thinner scraper that I can bend more than my normal one. That might work for you.
post #5 of 20

Was thinking about this thread as I tuned today, using CH4 (sort of a protective layer I put on after all the hot scraping and before the stuff I expect to need).  Maybe it's that the OP is using a hard wax, which has not been quite as evenly ironed in on the tips and tails and there are lumps?  The only skipping I get is with hard wax if the application is uneven.  It doesn't bother me, I just scrape more in that area, but I didn't see anything like this with the warmer wax, not even on the tips or tails.  

post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

Sounds like you may be experiencing pretty common--concavities at the tip and tail (the center portion(s) are lower than the edges). So when you scrape as normal with a flat scraper it leaves wax behind in these areas. Does this sound familiar?

zenny

 

Interesting - I didn't even think about that. I'll need to get a true bar and see how they look.

post #7 of 20

Agree with everyone.  Scraping tips and tails is a stability problem of that part of the ski,  a thinner scraper/plastic you can flex helps AND  no big deal/not important part of wax job.  BUT by all means do it right and just work with a more supported tip or tail, work slower with scrape moves and a slighly flexible plastic scraper will also make the job easier.

post #8 of 20

i use an old credit card to work the tips and tails, especially since some have metal tipguards.  I switch to the wood chiseling technique rather than the butter-the-toast ski scraping technique.

post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
 

Agree with everyone.  Scraping tips and tails is a stability problem of that part of the ski,  a thinner scraper/plastic you can flex helps AND  no big deal/not important part of wax job.  BUT by all means do it right and just work with a more supported tip or tail, work slower with scrape moves and a slighly flexible plastic scraper will also make the job easier.

 

Thanks all for the suggestions. I wonder if I have my vises in too far from the ends to support the tip and tail. There's probably a foot of space between the ends of the skis and where the vise is. I'll try pushing it out a bit and see if that makes a difference.

post #10 of 20

if you have a rectangular scraper... flip it to the shorter end and carefully scrape in the areas that need more scraping.

post #11 of 20

Reminds me of what happens when I forget to scrape my skis altogether:eek  They're really squirrely for a run or two then ski fine.  But, at the end of the day there is that channel of gunk down the middle of the skis with smooth, nicely honed p-tex about an inch in from each edge.  That stuff on your tips and tails also doesn't much matter unless you are skiing deep, wet snow.  I just leave it most of the time..

post #12 of 20

It's either a problem with proper support for the tips/tails (as stated previously) or I have the sneakin' suspicion that the OP isn't scraping properly.  What clued me into this train of thought is the comment about "getting a good finish across the tips and tails".  The goals isn't to get a good finish when scraping wax - it's to get all the wax off the base - every last stinkin' bit. :rolleyes:)

post #13 of 20

Another trick, which I now do routinely for all scraping due to cranky neck and shoulders, is to pre-soften the wax just before scraping with a few quick passes of the iron. Warm wax=easy scrap

post #14 of 20

I'm betting dollars to donuts that there was a misunderstanding of what waxing a ski is about.  It's about getting the wax IN the base, not ON the base. :rolleyes:)

 

< please don't take this as a personal attack OP - we all have to learn somehow ;)>

post #15 of 20

I had a pair of "Beta" construction Atomics 10 years ago where the base at the tips (a little) and the tails (a LOT) was noticeably concave and difficult to scrape, even when bending the scraper. I asked my then-shop about it and they said that was "normal" for those skis and that it didn't matter because "they flatten out when we put them through the machine." :rolleyes  Thanks so much. That is a big help, guys. Not sure whether they were full of it or not, but it did put me off Atomic for a while.

post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post
 

I'm betting dollars to donuts that there was a misunderstanding of what waxing a ski is about.  It's about getting the wax IN the base, not ON the base. :rolleyes:)

 

< please don't take this as a personal attack OP - we all have to learn somehow ;)>

 

No offense taken. I am new to this and still learning. Yes, I'm working to remove all the wax and then following up with a thorough brushing. I just found it odd that I'm spending the majority of my time removing the wax from such a small area. The rest of the ski is a breeze to scrape. Thanks again all for the help.

post #17 of 20

This might be a stupid suggestion-- but how about putting one hand under the tip for support while you scrape that section? 

post #18 of 20

Another suggestion is use a horsehair roto brush after you've scrapped the skis.  After years of brushing by hand, this year I bought a roto brush kit from Terry at SlidWright.  Now, I just scrape the skis with light pressure and let the roto brush take off the remaining wax.  Roto brushes really cut down on the waxing time and they do an excellent job.

post #19 of 20
This is an inconsequential issue, particularly at the tips, but i suppose if the extra bits offend your aesthetic sensibilities, i have a suggestion. Scrape your bases and edges as normal, do your brushing if you brush. Once finished take hair dryer and soften the offending excess tip/tail wax with it. Soften, i mean, not melt to liquid. Then whip your scraper across gently and there ya go. Or a rag would probably work fine too.
post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks all for the suggestions. I think it was a combination of skis being slightly concave at the tips and the vise placement. I widened the vises a bit to support more at the ends, and that helped. Spent a little more time and got all the wax off, and things look pretty good. I did my wife's skis over the weekend, which aren't concave at all, and didn't have any problems. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs