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Mitts with finger liners? - Page 2

post #31 of 51

My wife's hands/fingers get colder than mine, and she has had good luck with BD Mercury Mitts coupled with a hand warmer packet.  I bought a pair of the men's Mercury Mitts for the coldest days.  I just skied a day in 0-5 degree temps with below -10 wind chills using my BD Mercury Mitts and Dakine liner gloves.  The mitts have a separate channel for the index finger, not all fingers, but seem to be a good compromise.  I had no problem at all keeping hands/fingers warm ... can't say the same for my toes!! (and I have Hotronics with custom fitted boots!)

post #32 of 51
post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by deliberate1 View Post
 

I have used my beloved Burton AK mitts with finger liners longer, I believe, than any other ski garment I own. After ten years or so they are, regrettably, getting a bit worn and the down fill is compressed. I like the warmth of mitts combined with the tactile advantage of the finger sleeves. Reviews of the current version suggest some quality control issues. 

Other suggestions - down filled or synthetic.

Tx

D1

 

Here's my view of the issue.  First know that though I love being out skiing and will ski in close to ANY weather, but I detest being cold and my hands and feet get cold easily (big believer in sibhusky's There's no such thing as bad weather, only bad equipment.).  I do so much (and have spent so much) on staying warm, some of the other coaches call me "Princess".  After 20 years in the Marines, I fine with it :D

 

I wear Hestra's Army Leather Expedition Mitt.  You lose some dexterity and have the coordination of someone wearing boxing gloves (it isn't really that bad but it looks like you're wearing boxing gloves) but the warmth is incredible,  Read somewhere on their site this mitt has made it up Mount Everest.

Army Leather Expedition Mitt, Black

There is an inner liner that looks like this (can also be purchased separately):

 

Primaloft Extreme 3-Finger Liner (Black)

 

My hands usually bake in this set up.  The only time they have gotten cold is when I was videoing the kids at races and that's because my hands are out of the gloves for so long.  Often I'll wear a glove liner similar to this one:

Merino Wool Liner (Dark Grey)

I wear the liner only because it makes it easier for my hand to slide in and out if they get a little sweaty.  Also helps with keeping the hands warm when out of the glove. I will some times take my hands out of the mitts on the chair lift so they can "cool" off.  Prevents them from getting sweaty.

 

When coaching, I do take my hands out often, either to fix my own gear or to help one of my young athletes (they range in age from 6- 9) that needs their gear adjusted and I can get my mitts off and back on way faster than they can.

 

I have tried Swaney, BD Mercury Mitts, Reusch, and EMS.  All pale in comparison to the Hestras.  I have also used Hestra's Army Leather Extreme Mitt.  This is my second choice and is what my HS daughter uses.  We modified it with the liner posted above from the Expedition Mitt to make it warmer.  When she races on stupid cold days, she throws in a chemical hand warmer but that is because she's in a race suit and her body is competing with her hands for warmth.  In full gear, she doesn't need chemical warmers.

 

All of that doesn't come cheap but I was able to get good deals and catch sales to do it.  Aside from the times mentioned above out of my gloves, I've never had cold hands.  I use the same gloves for racing too.

 

Maybe you can just get a primaloft liner and keep the current mitts you have.

 

Since these mitts are too much for some days (i.e spring skiing), I also have the BD Guide Glove.

 

I know the cost of good mitts and gloves (like all ski gear) is ridiculous, but if you can subtract the cost of constantly using chemical heaters across ten years ($20/box * 10 years), it starts making the cost of expensive "good" gear more palatable.

 

Have fun,

Ken

post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

I have been REALLY happy with my Swany mitts. All the features you are looking for. Amazing price. and very comfotable.

I second the Swany recommendations. They are awesome on days in the 20s and days in the single digits
post #35 of 51

 

I too am looking for mitts without finger liners. My index finger is injured and has very little blood circulation. As a result I am forced to use hand warmers on most ski days. To complicate things, I am a ski coach. So, I would ideally like a full leather, "race" mitt. The Level Demo Pro Mitt fits the bill, but I can't find them anywhere in XL - 2XL.

post #36 of 51
post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
....

 

I know the cost of good mitts and gloves (like all ski gear) is ridiculous, but if you can subtract the cost of constantly using chemical heaters across ten years ($20/box * 10 years), it starts making the cost of expensive "good" gear more palatable.

 

Have fun,

Ken

 

Where do you get hand warmers that cheap?

Or is that price from 10 years ago?

post #38 of 51
Sounds like Costco, Amazon, or even Walmart.
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Sounds like Costco, Amazon, or even Walmart.

So close. BJ's. I believe the last time I bought a box it was $18 for a box of 40. I did get them from amazon once but I don't remember the price. If I bought them, it was probably close to what BJ's was.
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaceCoach View Post




I too am looking for mitts without finger liners. My index finger is injured and has very little blood circulation. As a result I am forced to use hand warmers on most ski days. To complicate things, I am a ski coach. So, I would ideally like a full leather, "race" mitt. The Level Demo Pro Mitt fits the bill, but I can't find them anywhere in XL - 2XL.

RC,
My theory on keeping hands warm is to dress them the same way I do my core; in layers. I've had the best results with a thin finger liner inside the mittens liner. I know with your index finger being injured that can change things, but the only time I've gotten cold was taking my hands out.
post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Sounds like Costco, Amazon, or even Walmart.

So close. BJ's. I believe the last time I bought a box it was $18 for a box of 40. I did get them from amazon once but I don't remember the price. If I bought them, it was probably close to what BJ's was.

Never even heard of BJ's... Gotta say it's not a name I'd pick for my store..
post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post


Never even heard of BJ's... Gotta say it's not a name I'd pick for my store..

 

My wife doesn't care for it either.  My sense of humor and her ability to say something before thinking about how I'll turn it around has caused me to get stink eye several times.  The last time was when she was balancing our accounts and she asked me "What's this $23.48 for BJ's?"  I said "A bargain!"

 

All jokes aside, it is a great place though and along the lines of Costco.   I prefer them over the rest plus I get a membership discount through work.

 

Ken

post #43 of 51

Just as a warning, for people using the chemical handwarmers, they don't seem to work once you get above 8000ft or so in elevation.

I've tried grabbers, and hothands. Only once I get back lower at the lodge at say 6500, then they get enough O2 to finally output heat.

 

So other warming solutions are needed if you're high up.  You could go electric, or a fuel based like the zippo handwarmer (This too will still suffer at altitude, and you need to ensure to be well ventilated as there will be some fumes as compared to it working at lower elevation).

post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post
 

Just as a warning, for people using the chemical handwarmers, they don't seem to work once you get above 8000ft or so in elevation.

I've tried grabbers, and hothands. Only once I get back lower at the lodge at say 6500, then they get enough O2 to finally output heat.

 

So other warming solutions are needed if you're high up.  You could go electric, or a fuel based like the zippo handwarmer (This too will still suffer at altitude, and you need to ensure to be well ventilated as there will be some fumes as compared to it working at lower elevation).

Hmmm. I haven't noticed that, and I rarely ski below 9000 ft.

post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post
 

Just as a warning, for people using the chemical handwarmers, they don't seem to work once you get above 8000ft or so in elevation.

I've tried grabbers, and hothands. Only once I get back lower at the lodge at say 6500, then they get enough O2 to finally output heat.

 

 

 

Our base elevation is at 9,200 ft with the summit at 11,500 ft . I use Hot Hands and Hot Feet all the time at these altitudes. Interesting theory though.  I could imagine that the lack of oxygen might make them less efficient; maybe they don't burn as hot but last longer?

post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

Hmmm. I haven't noticed that, and I rarely ski below 9000 ft.

Agree. And I've had many kids use handwarmers in there mittens over the years. I rarely need them with my Hestra Heli Pro mitts but they have helped when I do.
post #47 of 51
Iguess I got a bum pack or old formulation then. But yea, they do depend on O2. Its well known you can put them in a zip lock bag early to stop the reaction and reuse the remaining heat on another day.
post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post
 

 

 

Our base elevation is at 9,200 ft with the summit at 11,500 ft . I use Hot Hands and Hot Feet all the time at these altitudes. Interesting theory though.  I could imagine that the lack of oxygen might make them less efficient; maybe they don't burn as hot but last longer?

Lack of oxygen does affect it, eg, if there is no room in the gloves, they won't heat up very well. But I'm not sure about the general atmospheric oxygen....

post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Not that model, but a similar style is here in xl.
http://www.skis.com/Level-Race-CF-Ski-Racing-Mittens-2015/290976P,default,pd.html

Those are fantastic mitts, but I believe that model does have finger liners. I am looking for something WITHOUT finger liners. Am I mistaken?

post #50 of 51

Can I ask what you are getting for $160 over something more modest?

 

I have used the Dakine Scout mitten for threes years now in some miserable conditions. They have synthetic shell and a glove style liner. I do use Hot Hands for extra warmth but my hands have never been cold without. They have worn well and should be good for several more seasons. They cost $25.

post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaceCoach View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Not that model, but a similar style is here in xl.
http://www.skis.com/Level-Race-CF-Ski-Racing-Mittens-2015/290976P,default,pd.html
Those are fantastic mitts, but I believe that model does have finger liners. I am looking for something WITHOUT finger liners. Am I mistaken?

It said it had a mitten liner somewhere I read, but of course I can't find that now. Why don't you email the glove company and ask?
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