or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Drill for Roto Brushes

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

What drill are you all using for roto brushing?  I have three cordless drills (DeWalt & Milwaukee,) but they don't spin fast enough (about 1,400 rpms.) and the batteries die quickly.  It's my understanding that the finishing brush (nylon) should rotate at 2,500 rpms.  I'm looking for something that is compact enough for traveling.  Any suggestions?

post #2 of 16
Are you into racing? I ask because you mention travel.

I use a DeWalt 12 volt that goes up to 1800 rpms which is more than adequate for most roto applications. Which brushes do you have besides the nylon?

zenny
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

Zentune………I'm too old for racing, but my son is captain of his high school ski team and we do travel for his meets (we'll be in Loveland over Thanksgiving.}

 

I bought a roto brush kit from Terry which includes a brass, horse hair, and nylon brush.  I know that the brass brush should be used at a low rpm (600 rpm,) but aren't the horse hair and nylon brush suppose to be used at about 2,500 rpms?

post #4 of 16
I recently purchased a Ryobi compact cordless drill. I believe it goes up to 1660 rpms. It works very well. So well I've been using only a horse hair brush and a nylon brush.

One thing I notice is that some folks use the drill in reverse because the start at the tip. Start at the tail with the drill on the other side of the ski and you can use it in forward and it spins faster.
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TOMT

 

I bought a roto brush kit from Terry which includes a brass, horse hair, and nylon brush.  I know that the brass brush should be used at a low rpm (600 rpm,) but aren't the horse hair and nylon brush suppose to be used at about 2,500 rpms?

 

   Nah. You'll be just fine at 1400-1800 rpm's on the hh and nylon. Keep in mind these are general guidelines and that 1000 or lower is for steel and brass (due to the aggressiveness). 

 

   Technically yes though, 2000-2500 for nylon, 1800 for hh....

 

    zenny

post #6 of 16

You can also consider a corded drill.  Harbor Freight do a nice light 3/8in variable speed drill that with one of their coupons you can usually pick up for about $14.  It has a variable limit stop on the trigger that you can preset (not that precise but near enough! ) and will give you the higher speed as well.

 

as the others have said, cordless also works well and some of the newer ones do go up to 1800ish.

 

Apologize for slight thread deviation but @zentune @L&AirC  are you guys using a Lithium one?  I am still on older NiCads and was looking Li but heard from a few people that the Li batteries tended to have a short life.  Given that my old craftsman 15V is still going strong (2 batteries) after 9 years, I didn't go for one.  

post #7 of 16

   Corded is OK, but then you will have to contend with the cord possibly catching on things on your bench...I hate that :hopmad: 

 

   @ScotsSkier, I use an older NiCad---damn thing just won't die :D

 

   zenny

post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post
 

   Corded is OK, but then you will have to contend with the cord possibly catching on things on your bench...I hate that :hopmad: 

 

   @ScotsSkier, I use an older NiCad---damn thing just won't die :D

 

   zenny

 

Yup!  I hear you!  Tried various positions for the cord outlet.  (Same issue with the iron of course!)  Best I have found, other than a drop down from the top, is to put the outlet juts below the bench top, in the middle, or my latest attempt , using one of these extended outlet strips at the back of the bench

post #9 of 16
I started out using a cordless and swapping batteries. It was a pain. Tried the corded drill and never went back. The outlets in our workshop are at chest level and I just use hooks to keep it out of the way. I have pegboard behind the bench, so it's easy.

I make sure the bristles are moving toward the tail the same as they would be if I were handbrushing.
post #10 of 16
I was using the NiCad on my older Ryobi. Had it for years. Did have to replace the batteries. It is still ok but noticed the performance was starting to slip and the clutch was starting to slip. Keep in mind I used this tool a lot. I do my own stunts around the house and it almost always include this tool. I had the larger capacity batteries too.

I now have a compact Ryobi with lithium + batteries and it is powerful and the batteries last forever. I finally got one to run out the other day. The performance last right to the end and then it just pretty much stops. On the NiCad it would start slowing down.

I also like the compact design. It's only about an inch or so shorter but make a huge difference when doing chores around the house. They state it is the same power as the full size. According to the box, they are both the same rpm.

I'm very happy with it.

Sibhusky found a way to deal with the cord. They way I set up my bench isn't conducive to that.

Can't wait until there is a cordless iron.

Ken
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 

L&AirC…………I never noticed it before, but you are right - the drill does spin faster in the forward position.  From the research I've done, going from tip to tail or tail to tip shouldn't make any difference.  The important thing is to make sure the brush is rotating such that the "dust" is forward of the brush.  A cordless iron???  If it can be engineered, I bet you'd sell a ton of them.

 

ScotSkier………….Is this the drill you are suggesting: http://www.harborfreight.com/variable-speed-reversible-drill-60614-9152.html

 

zentune…………I agree - I can see the cord catching on everything and turning my work bench into a "yard sale."  A cordless drill would, obviously, solve that problem.  However, the fastest cordless drill I've found spins at about 1800 rpms.  I'm sure 1800 rpms is fast enough, but I'm one of those very anal individuals (I use a torque wrench on spark plugs, oil drain plugs, and lug nuts.)  

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TOMT View Post

 

zentune…………I agree - I can see the cord catching on everything and turning my work bench into a "yard sale."  A cordless drill would, obviously, solve that problem.  However, the fastest cordless drill I've found spins at about 1800 rpms.  I'm sure 1800 rpms is fast enough, but I'm one of those very anal individuals (I use a torque wrench on spark plugs, oil drain plugs, and lug nuts.)  

 

    I've prepped skis for racers with 1800 rpm's and have gotten very good feedback in terms of glide. I would also like to mention that I do not consider roto brushes a "standalone" deal--I use hand brushes during the brushing process as well....

 

   ....I hear ya on the anal-ness though! How about getting a corded drill and one of those retractable extension cord thingys that you can hang from your ceiling? Presto, less issues with cord    management :) BTW, are you into filing and polishing edges yet? That's where I get real anal :rules:              

 

 

   zenny

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TOMT View Post
 

L&AirC…………I never noticed it before, but you are right - the drill does spin faster in the forward position.  From the research I've done, going from tip to tail or tail to tip shouldn't make any difference.  The important thing is to make sure the brush is rotating such that the "dust" is forward of the brush.  A cordless iron???  If it can be engineered, I bet you'd sell a ton of them.

 

ScotSkier………….Is this the drill you are suggesting: http://www.harborfreight.com/variable-speed-reversible-drill-60614-9152.html

 

zentune…………I agree - I can see the cord catching on everything and turning my work bench into a "yard sale."  A cordless drill would, obviously, solve that problem.  However, the fastest cordless drill I've found spins at about 1800 rpms.  I'm sure 1800 rpms is fast enough, but I'm one of those very anal individuals (I use a torque wrench on spark plugs, oil drain plugs, and lug nuts.)  

 

You can get the exact same results with a hand brush.  It just takes longer.  What's your rpm with this in your hand?:

 

 

I'm guessing not 1800.  I also think you should think of the 2500 rpm you're seeing as a speed limit and not a required speed like a torque setting.  I'm the same way by the way.  Always use torque wrenches.

 

Like Zenny mentioned above, with metal bristles, you need to go slower.  I've heard it is so you don't damage the base and it is also so the bristles don't come flying out at you.  Whatever the reason, even 800 rpm is way faster than you can move your arm.

 

Ken

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TOMT View Post

L&AirC…………I never noticed it before, but you are right - the drill does spin faster in the forward position.  From the research I've done, going from tip to tail or tail to tip shouldn't make any difference.  The important thing is to make sure the brush is rotating such that the "dust" is forward of the brush.  A cordless iron???  If it can be engineered, I bet you'd sell a ton of them.

ScotSkier………….Is this the drill you are suggesting: http://www.harborfreight.com/variable-speed-reversible-drill-60614-9152.html

zentune…………I agree - I can see the cord catching on everything and turning my work bench into a "yard sale."  A cordless drill would, obviously, solve that problem.  However, the fastest cordless drill I've found spins at about 1800 rpms.  I'm sure 1800 rpms is fast enough, but I'm one of those very anal individuals (I use a torque wrench on spark plugs, oil drain plugs, and lug nuts.)  

Yep, that's the one Tomt. Also you cam find discount coupons in all the mags and Sunday papers that will give you another 25% off. I've been running mine for about 4 years now without issues. It is due a set of brushes I think but might be cheaper just buying a new one,!
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 

ScotSkier………….Thanks.  At $16.00, how can you go wrong.  I ordered one today.

 

L&AirC…………..I like your analogy of a speed limit verses a torque setting.  I know hand brushing works, but, in my endless purse of perfection and to save time, I bought the root brushes

 

zentune…………..Don't even get me started on edge and base tuning.  Between, jigs, files, and diamond stones, I bet I have at least $300. invested. 

post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

Can't wait until there is a cordless iron.
 

 

There's your retirement fund, right there.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs