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Eastern Skier who misses his Rossignol S86's - Advice on Replacement(s) Wanted

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hello All - this is my first post in a forum ever so forgive me if I mess up on protocol.   I'm looking for a replacement or two for my Rossignol S86's which were damaged.   Here's a little about me and where I ski.

 

Ski location - primarily Eastern (northern Vermont/Gore Mountain NY)

 

Height 5' 10" Weight 210.  Age 47 (2 knee surgeries to repair the ACL in left knee)

 

Ability - Advanced (I ski most expert terrain out here but I wouldn't call myself an expert)

 

I ski primarily groomers and play in the woods when I can.  Not a big fan of the bumps.

 

So I'm looking for a replacement for the S86's and would consider also picking up a wider ski for the occasional powder day.

 

Any advice from you folks would be much appreciated!

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 14

There are a lot of choices for you to get that easy feel of your S86 and going a bit wider. 

 

Blizzard Brahma

Nordica Steadfast

Rossi Experience 88

Head Rev 90

 

All these are very good on the groomers and strong enough to hold up your 210 frame. I listed them in the order of power with the top one being the strongest down to easiest. You could go wider for a bit more float for the soft stuff but at the cost of hard snow performance  especially for your ability and physical limitations. 

post #3 of 14

The Rossi Experience 88 was the S86's replacement. Have you demoed it? It is a favorite here in MN, where the conditions would be similar to yours. If you liked the Rossi feel it would be the closest comparison, without trying a dozen other brands in that width. You could take a look at eBay, an unused or lightly used pair of 86's may pop up.

I have the S87 and I really like them. I am going to demo the E88's and E98's this season, just to see for myself the difference.

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks Philbug - can you elaborate on your ranking of strongest to easiest?   Easiest in terms of...?

 

Also, recommendation for a wider ski for the occasional dumping?  It would be a crime to miss a day because of to much snow!

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMAN19 View Post
 

Thanks Philbug - can you elaborate on your ranking of strongest to easiest?   Easiest in terms of...?

 

Also, recommendation for a wider ski for the occasional dumping?  It would be a crime to miss a day because of to much snow!

The top ones are a bit stiffer and will require a bit more input in technique and are less tolerant of poor ability but can be the most rewarding as you improve. As far as going wider, remember, the more things you ask a ski to do, the less things it does well. All of these are competent in some fresh but as you get wider they will be better in deeper snow but at the cost of hard snow performance and at the same time putting more stress on your (already) suspect knees. If soft snow performance IS important to you, get a specific soft snow ski down the road...or just rent that day. But a 88-90mm ski will handle 90% of what you need for the east, don't let the last 10% be the tail that wags the dog. 

post #6 of 14

FWIW.........the Ex 88 is the replacement in the Rossi lineup for the S 86 but it is not remotely the same ski and wouldn't necessarily be a plug and play replacement for you.

 

SJ

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

I hear you.  I was referring a second pair of wider ski's.  I blew my knee out a few years back the morning after a nice dumping.  I only had a pair at <80mm at the time and I was struggling.  So Im thinking of picking up a second pair of skis for those days.

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

SJ - what ski's do you think I should consider?

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMAN19 View Post
 

SJ - what ski's do you think I should consider?


I like Phil's list but might drop the Ex88 due to it having a really wide tail and I might add the Head Rev 85 pro. Then you'd have a nice replacement for what your old ski was and you could seek out an easygoing wide ski for deeper days.

 

SJ

post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 

I ordered last years Rev Pro 85 last night (despite the fugly graphic!) .  So know I think I want to pick up some 70ish skis for the hard snow conditions and an easy going powder ski.

 

For the powder I hear a lot of votes for the Patron.  Any other suggestions to look at?

 

For hard snow/Ice, what skis/brands should I consider in a narrower ski (70/mid 70)? I like damp/forgiving,easy to initiate turns etc.  Not a bump or high speed skier anymore. 

 

Thanks folks

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMAN19 View Post
 

I ordered last years Rev Pro 85 last night (despite the fugly graphic!) .  So know I think I want to pick up some 70ish skis for the hard snow conditions and an easy going powder ski.

 

For hard snow/Ice, what skis/brands should I consider in a narrower ski (70/mid 70)? I like damp/forgiving,easy to initiate turns etc.  Not a bump or high speed skier anymore. 

 

Thanks folks

 

Guessing you made a good call on the Heads.

 

As for adding a narrower ski, I would just say that if you head out on eastern boilerplate on any pair of skis that doesn't have a fresh edge tune then it's a total waste of time, energy, and money to talk about which models have good edge hold. This came up recently in another thread where someone was complaining about poor edge hold on ice and then it emerged that he only sharpens his edges once a year. Well .... duh.

 

With this in mind, I say keep the Heads sharp with a 3 degree side bevel, touching them up every other ski day, and see how they do. I predict you will be pleasantly surprised. If you do that and are STILL looking for more of an ice skate, then start looking at true carvers. If you're not devoted to keeping skis sharp, it doesn't matter how much of an ice ripper it is; it will suck on ice.

post #12 of 14
The Rev 85 is a great ski, congrats on the purchase. Qcanoe is correct in that maintaining a good tune will greatly enhance the hard-snow performance of that ski.

That said, There's more to the narrower ski than just improved edge hold. I think the Supershape line has more energy and pop in the carve than the Rev line, but it does need to be skied more aggressively. I would agree that you should ski the Rev first before ordering a narrower ski. Depending on your style, you may find you want the narrower ski and you may find you don't need it.

Maybe I'm out of touch, but I still think a ski like the Patron at 113 underfoot is too wide for all but a handful of days in the east coast (and even then, probably just a few runs on those days). I feel like there are a number of great new skis in the one-oh-something category that will give you more than enough float for east coast powder and still be able to give you some groomer performance when you need it. Rossi Soul 7, Nordica El Capo, Line Sick Day, Atomic Ritual, Cham 107HM, etc.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Makes sense . So in terms of edge maintenance, are you guys touching them up yourself or bringing them into the shop?
post #14 of 14
Once a year I have the shop do it (usually a base grind, too) and then I maintain the side edges. There's a lot of threads in the Tuning forum and plenty of YouTube videos to get you started. For about $200 you can get a vise, iron, edge guides, files and stones. I'm probably not going to be so diligant about it now that I'm living in the PNW, but when I lived back east it made a big difference. Definitely worth the investment. Plus, it's kind of fun.
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