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Another Utah Thread...[east coast intermediates]

post #1 of 51
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, long time epicski lurker, now finally turning to the pros for some advice about my trip in January. We're gonna be heading to SLC the week after New Years (Jan. 6th-11th) for a full  four days of skiing. Up at the crack of dawn, hit that first lift, and don't stop till we drop :) 

The crowds should have moved on, and fingers crossed we get good conditions. 

 

Anyway, me and the lady friend are (l)east coast intermediates who occasionally hit single blacks, and we're trying to pick the best resorts to split up our time (wish we had more, but so it goes).  Alta/Snowbird seems like a given, we're thinking at least a day for each, but should we even bother heading out to Canyons, PC, Deer Valley, or anywhere else for a day? I hear mixed things, and just want to know what you guys would recommend given our limited time. We will have a rental car btw, so getting around should be no issue. 

Many thanks in advance for your help!     

post #2 of 51

That is a good time of year to avoid crowds.  As always with skiing it depends on the snowpack and the amount of time since the last snow.  Everything being equal, I think the best resorts for people at the level you describe are (in no particular order): Alta, Solitude, Snowbasin and Deer Valley.  IMO, Snowbird is best for somebody just slightly more advanced than your self-described level but is super cool and certainly worth a day.  If it were me and I wanted to experience a nice cross-section of Utah skiing (and the snow and snowpack is adequate), I would prioritize Alta, Snowbasin and Deer Valley.

 

If you stay in the Salt Lake valley, Alta, Snowbird, Solitude and Deer Valley require a similar drive time.  If you stay close to one of those resorts, it will take at least and hour plus to get to the other (except of course Alta and Snowbird which are right next to each other connected).  Snowbasin will take an hour or a little more from Salt Lake and Park City and an hour and a half from one of the Cottonwood Canyons (Alta, Snowbird, Solitude and Brighton).

post #3 of 51

I dunno, you may want to reverse that thought process and stay at Park city and ski PC and Canyons. At your level you may have more fun with better nightlife and lots of variety with blues. The Utah blues maybe what you consider east coast single blacks...

post #4 of 51

Stay in either downtown SLC or Sandy/Midvale and ski a day at Alta, a day at Park City MR and a day at Snowbasin.  The last day ski Snowbird after you get a feel for western skiing and resorts.  All the other SLC resorts you missed are certainly worth a day of skiing, and it wouldn't be a mistake to ski any of them on this trip, but I would consider those the big 4.  

 

Snowbird is a caution if you are an intermediate w/o a guide.  It's the biggest resort out there with unique big features, and lots of steepness(moguled up too)!  It can be tricky because intermediates can have trouble navigating it finding the easier way down and getting into trouble.   Not everyone gets off with the tram like I do, but for me riding it is always a highlight of my trips to SLC.  A smooth 3,000ft in 7 minutes to the top of the mountain with three huge bowls you choose from to descend.  But if you are an intermediate, you can't just ski blindly and expect you will end up with an easier way down, but the map does work.

 

Read my guide linked below for an overview of Snowbird and SLC in general.

post #5 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccohen322 View Post
 

Hey guys, long time epicski lurker, now finally turning to the pros for some advice about my trip in January. We're gonna be heading to SLC the week after New Years (Jan. 6th-11th) for a full  four days of skiing. Up at the crack of dawn, hit that first lift, and don't stop till we drop :) 

The crowds should have moved on, and fingers crossed we get good conditions. 

 

Anyway, me and the lady friend are (l)east coast intermediates who occasionally hit single blacks, and we're trying to pick the best resorts to split up our time (wish we had more, but so it goes).  Alta/Snowbird seems like a given, we're thinking at least a day for each, but should we even bother heading out to Canyons, PC, Deer Valley, or anywhere else for a day? I hear mixed things, and just want to know what you guys would recommend given our limited time. We will have a rental car btw, so getting around should be no issue. 

Many thanks in advance for your help!     

Welcome!  Have you two skied out west before?  If so, where?  If not, what's your favorite place near home?

 

You've gotten good advice already.  I would say save Snowbird for the next trip to Utah.  When you are at Alta, be sure to find the Supreme lift.  If you stay in SLC and it's clear weather, a drive out to Snowbasin is well worth doing.  Long groomers with great views.  Have lunch up at the John Paul Lodge and watch the experts tackle the chutes above.

post #6 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Welcome!  Have you two skied out west before?  If so, where?  If not, what's your favorite place near home?

 

You've gotten good advice already.  I would say save Snowbird for the next trip to Utah.  When you are at Alta, be sure to find the Supreme lift.  If you stay in SLC and it's clear weather, a drive out to Snowbasin is well worth doing.  Long groomers with great views.  Have lunch up at the John Paul Lodge and watch the experts tackle the chutes above.

 

Hi!

 

We've actually never skied out west before...I know it's embarrassing (although we're both still in college). We're based around NYC, but we've done Killington, Stowe, Okemo, Mt. Snow, and a few others a number of times.

 

The dates worked out for break, so we finally bit the bullet on a good plane ticket. Like I said, we're not pros by any means, but we're competent enough to handle a good chunk of what those mountains offer difficulty-wise (though no icy double blacks atm) . 

 

Anyway, the advice given by the posters thus far seems great. I think we'll definitely do Alta, and now strongly consider Snowbasin as well. SnowbirdDevotee's suggestion seems like it might work well. Despite your admonition about putting off Snowbird, I think we're both dying to see the legend. Doing it on the last day might be worthwhile if we feel our skill level is good enough to handle Utah level blues comfortably. Our schedule would probably then end up being 1) Alta 2) Snowbasin 3) PCMR (or Canyons?) 4) Snowbird. 

 

Lunch at the John Paul Lodge does sound awesome, though we might be on a "sandwich and cliff bar" style budget after splurging for the rest of the trip. 

 

Thank you everyone for your input thus far. I know it's still a ways off, but we're already excited, and you guys are helping!

 

P.S.  if anyone's got an ideas for a cheap local place to rent decent skis for a couple days that would be appreciated as well. 

post #7 of 51

If you are average age college students, then renting a car might be an issue.  Have you checked?  It's no problem to use the ski bus for BCC/LCC but gets more complicated to also cover PCMR and/or Snowbasin.  One reason my nephew used to drive out from Chicago to UT/CO for ski trips.

 

If there is decent visibility and not too much wind at Snowbird, sounds like you would be okay.

 

The prices at Snowbasin are actually not bad compared to other ski resorts.  But I understand budget priorities.

post #8 of 51

I may get flack from others here,  but Powder Mnt is very affordable.  I hear it's going to be turned into an Aspen someday,  but for now it's very affordable and lots of people brown bag there.  Only a few lifts,  but lots of area to ski.

 

Another point is this:  if you can ski in the East,  you can ski in the  west so long as you don't try deep powder.  Back East folks ski on ice.  In Utah they ski on snow.

post #9 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

If you are average age college students, then renting a car might be an issue.  Have you checked?  It's no problem to use the ski bus for BCC/LCC but gets more complicated to also cover PCMR and/or Snowbasin.  One reason my nephew used to drive out from Chicago to UT/CO for ski trips.

 

If there is decent visibility and not too much wind at Snowbird, sounds like you would be okay.

 

The prices at Snowbasin are actually not bad compared to other ski resorts.  But I understand budget priorities.

 

Hertz rents to 20+ years old now. There's also codes floating around the web to waive the under 25 fees ;)

I've got a nice compact reserved for $27 a day, hoping I can even do better with a promotional code.

We really wanted the flexibility of a car, and luckily, it was doable! 

post #10 of 51
Here's my recommendation: Stay in Park City, ski the big blue cruisers at PCMR the first day to get acclimated, drive to Alta day two ( the scenery will blow you away). Drive to Snowbasin day three via the back way - US 84- more gorgeous Utah. Day 4, relax at luxurious Deer Valley, ski hero groomers and eat a great lunch... Have a ski in latte at the St. Regis. Can't go wrong whatever you do. No crowds...


Ps: forget about ice. Ain't no ice in Utah until freeze thaw cycle in late spring.....
post #11 of 51

closest thing to ice in Utah is the  run that goes down to the back gondola at Park City.  I kinda like a little ice from time to time so long as I don't run up it unexpected-like.  Ice makes a man dig them edges in for some grip and think he's skiing in Europe somewhere--or in the Southeast.

post #12 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowalker View Post
 

I may get flack from others here,  but Powder Mnt is very affordable.  I hear it's going to be turned into an Aspen someday,  but for now it's very affordable and lots of people brown bag there.  Only a few lifts,  but lots of area to ski.

 

Another point is this:  if you can ski in the East,  you can ski in the  west so long as you don't try deep powder.  Back East folks ski on ice.  In Utah they ski on snow.

While PowMow is certainly affordable, not sure the extra driving time would be worth it for a short first trip out west given the options available closer to SLC.  Plus the road could be a bit tricky if snow covered.  They could use the ski bus for LCC/BCC if staying in a SLC motel in Sandy/Midvale.

 

So far, the new owners of PowMow are focusing on building away from the ski slopes.  They have a rather different agenda than most buyers of ski resorts.

post #13 of 51

I like Mr. Crab's idea. If you've nev er been out west, might be nice to stay in a ski town as opposed to SLC. That is a relatively slow time, and if you look for a 1 BR condo on VRBO, I bet you can get a pretty good deal. Check out Bear Hollow in Kimball Junction area. And to be honest, for someone who just occasionally does east coast blacks, you would find plenty to challenge you at PC areas. But, the scenery is better at Alta. And Snowbasin would be awesome at your level. If visibility is good, the Strawberry side has the best blue cruisers anywhere. 

post #14 of 51

As an intermediate East coast skier who's been to UT a few times, here are a few thoughts. SLC is a city and doesn't have a ski resort feel. If you stay out near the roads to Alta/Bird or Solitude/Brighton it's mostly like staying in a suburb. Lots of strip malls, chain restaurants, car dealerships, etc. Certainly lots of dining options and you can find inexpensive lodging. It just doesn't feel like a resort, because it isn't. Downtown Park City feels like a real resort town. We loved Alta as low intermediates. There are groomed blues off every lift. It's not a great cruiser mountain but it's certainly fun for a few days and you can find some easy introductory ungroomed areas to play in. Very nice restaurant at the Collins mid station. I've only skied the Bird one day. It was near white out conditions and I thought it was a challenge. I've really liked Solitude as well. IMO the Cottonwoods Canyons areas are prettier than the PC areas. Given usual conditions, I'd say the blues at places like Stowe, Cannon, Sugarbush, Jay are generally at least as challenging as those I've skied out West. It seems to get very mixed reviews but we've really had a great time at The Canyons. It's huge and can be hard to find your way around. They have a free tour that you might consider if you go there. Never skied at PCMR. No reason, we've jjust never gone there over The Canyons or Deer Valley. Deer Valley is groomer heaven and has great food. It's all really good and you'll have a great time. It's about an hour drive from PC to the Cottonwoods Canyons resorts. It's not a hard drive but the roads can be a challenge if the weather is bad. And the road to Alta/Bird says it requires you to have chains or 4wd. If I stayed in SLC area I'd probably just ski at the Cottonwoods Canyons areas. If you stay in PC I'd probably do a day at DV, a day at PCMR or The Canyons, and at least give one of Alta/Bird/Solitude/Brighton a try.

post #15 of 51

So many people recommending PC area resorts due to the ski town feel and dining... These are college kids on a college budget! And they want to ski til they drop! 

 

Stay at the SLC resorts... and if you want a diversion, the only place worth the drive (from a skiing perspective) would be Snowbasin.  Snowbasin has probably the best/most intermediate friendly terrain in Utah as most runs are an "interesting" 2000-2500ft vert in length (vs 1000-1500ft at PC), but its a bit out there, and often doesn't get as good snow.  If the snow is good, you should go for it.  

 

I'd also potentially recommend Brighton over Solitude.  Solitude has more steep groomers, but Brighton has intermediate friendly trees which hold good snow/powder for days after a storm.  Either one is good for a day, especially on a day where the legs might want a bit of a rest from 2000ft+ vertical runs.  It just comes down to whether groomers or trees are your thing (you're young... go for the trees!!!! ;)).

post #16 of 51

I forgot to mention... look at the Crystal Inn Midvale for lodging.  Its a good clean hotel that serves a full buffet breakfast and even a light snack at dinner time (think soup and plain sandwiches).  Usually they run a deal where the 4th night is free.  Also, when we were last there, they had a service where they'd drive you and pick you up to/from any local restaurants for free.  That worked out when we wanted to have a few beers and not worry about driving.

 

Also, for lift tickets/ski rentals, Ski N See is nearby.  If you pre-book online you get some good deals on rentals.  

 

Another lift ticket option is ordering the Salt Lake Superpass online.  Its good for the 4 SLC based resorts.  I believe expedia has a promotion where you get one day free.  The good news with the Superpass is that includes a ride on the bus, so if its storming out, and your compact car isn't allowed up the canyon, you can take the bus for free.

post #17 of 51
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all this input everyone. It turns out we'll actually have about an extra half a day to ski due to a schedule change (We looked into making our Saturday flight later and it was doable for free. We'll be able to ski until about 1pm instead of heading to the airport in the morning - score!) It looks like it's gonna be a total of five mountains then, with the last one being slightly shortened. Taking JoeSchmoe's advice, we might make Solitude or Brighton that final one. 

 

About the rental car though - we only have it reserved (not paid yet), and while we would love it, if the public transportation is really good enough to get us there early in the AM then we might be able to settle for the busses. Plus, RISkier mentioned the possibility of needing snow chains or AWD for the road, which would make things much more complicated. As mentioned, it is free with the SuperPass (which looks to be the best deal). What do you say, is it good enough?

post #18 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccohen322 View Post
 

Thanks for all this input everyone. It turns out we'll actually have about an extra half a day to ski due to a schedule change (We looked into making our Saturday flight later and it was doable for free. We'll be able to ski until about 1pm instead of heading to the airport in the morning - score!) It looks like it's gonna be a total of five mountains then, with the last one being slightly shortened. Taking JoeSchmoe's advice, we might make Solitude or Brighton that final one. 

 

About the rental car though - we only have it reserved (not paid yet), and while we would love it, if the public transportation is really good enough to get us there early in the AM then we might be able to settle for the busses. Plus, RISkier mentioned the possibility of needing snow chains or AWD for the road, which would make things much more complicated. As mentioned, it is free with the SuperPass (which looks to be the best deal). What do you say, is it good enough?

If you pick a motel near a bus stop, certainly possible to ski LCC/BCC without a rental car.  That said, there is more flexibility with a car.  Might be best to wait until closer to the date to decide.  If it's likely to be snowing, then ditch the car and enjoy the powder close at hand.  If it's going to be clear, then keep the car and go explore Park City one evening and Snowbasin for a day.

 

Do some research about how to handle the ski bus and getting from the airport to a motel.

 

Another motel possibility in Midvale is the La Quinta.

post #19 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccohen322 View Post
 

 

Hi!

 

We've actually never skied out west before...I know it's embarrassing (although we're both still in college). We're based around NYC, but we've done Killington, Stowe, Okemo, Mt. Snow, and a few others a number of times.

 

The dates worked out for break, so we finally bit the bullet on a good plane ticket. Like I said, we're not pros by any means, but we're competent enough to handle a good chunk of what those mountains offer difficulty-wise (though no icy double blacks atm) . 

 

Anyway, the advice given by the posters thus far seems great. I think we'll definitely do Alta, and now strongly consider Snowbasin as well. SnowbirdDevotee's suggestion seems like it might work well. Despite your admonition about putting off Snowbird, I think we're both dying to see the legend. Doing it on the last day might be worthwhile if we feel our skill level is good enough to handle Utah level blues comfortably. Our schedule would probably then end up being 1) Alta 2) Snowbasin 3) PCMR (or Canyons?) 4) Snowbird. 

 

Lunch at the John Paul Lodge does sound awesome, though we might be on a "sandwich and cliff bar" style budget after splurging for the rest of the trip. 

 

Thank you everyone for your input thus far. I know it's still a ways off, but we're already excited, and you guys are helping!

 

P.S.  if anyone's got an ideas for a cheap local place to rent decent skis for a couple days that would be appreciated as well. 

 

what slopes at stowe do you ski? what do you actually like?

 

I have worked as an instructor at both and can recommend where to ski at Snowbird...and Alta based on where you ski at stowe.

also why is this coast least?

post #20 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

what slopes at stowe do you ski? what do you actually like?

 

I have worked as an instructor at both and can recommend where to ski at Snowbird...and Alta based on where you ski at stowe.

also why is this coast least?

 

Haha, you're absolutely right. I've had some killer powder days in VT. I guess I just play into the online ski community stereotype of skiing on the east coast being "less than". What can I say, I'm young and easily influenced? ;)

 

Anyway, Stowe is a great mountain. It's been at least three years now though, so my memory of individual slopes is a little hazy. In general I enjoy a mix of everything, from easy groomers to moguls. I can do steep, but, I think I'll need a day to get adjusted. Honestly though, I don't think I ever tried anything that would qualify as real "expert" level terrain. For all intents and purposes, consider me an intermediate skier, who has done enough single blacks not to wipe out every time, but does not feel ready to take on more difficult runs...yet. 

post #21 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccohen322 View Post
 

 

Haha, you're absolutely right. I've had some killer powder days in VT. I guess I just play into the online ski community stereotype of skiing on the east coast being "less than". What can I say, I'm young and easily influenced? ;)

 

Anyway, Stowe is a great mountain. It's been at least three years now though, so my memory of individual slopes is a little hazy. In general I enjoy a mix of everything, from easy groomers to moguls. I can do steep, but, I think I'll need a day to get adjusted. Honestly though, I don't think I ever tried anything that would qualify as real "expert" level terrain. For all intents and purposes, consider me an intermediate skier, who has done enough single blacks not to wipe out every time, but does not feel ready to take on more difficult runs...yet. 

 

 

when you ski bumps can you link turns? with a pole touch? if your answer is yes then I would say snowbird should be no problem even the steeper ungroomed stuff.

 

snowbird is visually more intimidating than stowe but far far easier to ski on a average day.  alta by comparision is even easier to ski. both are fun with tons of adventous fun tree runs all over the place.

 

For eats at snowbird bring your our stuff to really save money, or go to general grits grits is thecheapest place on the hill to eat and is located in the bottom of the snowbird center. Snowbird IMO has the best apres in the nation with the tram deck when its a nice not to cold day.

post #22 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccohen322 View Post
 

Thanks for all this input everyone. It turns out we'll actually have about an extra half a day to ski due to a schedule change (We looked into making our Saturday flight later and it was doable for free. We'll be able to ski until about 1pm instead of heading to the airport in the morning - score!) It looks like it's gonna be a total of five mountains then, with the last one being slightly shortened. Taking JoeSchmoe's advice, we might make Solitude or Brighton that final one. 

 

 

 

With the extra day, don't be afraid to do them both.  Like I said, they make for a great "rest" day as the terrain is really interesting, but just short enough that your legs don't get the same burn as at the bigger resorts.  As has been said many times over, the snow stays better longer there due to less skier traffic than the LCC resorts.

 

My opinion is that if your willing to do some trees do your full day at Brighton and your 2/3 day at Solitude.  

 

If it were me, I'd go:

 

Alta

Snowbasin

Brighton ("rest day")

Snowbird

Solitude.  

 

If snow conditions or canyon restrictions were to dictate otherwise, I'd readjust as necessary.

post #23 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccohen322 View Post
 

About the rental car though - we only have it reserved (not paid yet), and while we would love it, if the public transportation is really good enough to get us there early in the AM then we might be able to settle for the busses. Plus, RISkier mentioned the possibility of needing snow chains or AWD for the road, which would make things much more complicated. As mentioned, it is free with the SuperPass (which looks to be the best deal). What do you say, is it good enough?

 

Forget about skiing on your last day if you don't rent a car... The bus system isn't the greatest mid-day.

 

I'm not sure how many days/season chain/4WD drive rules are in effect, but in 13 ski days in Utah, I've never been "lucky" enough to experience them. Most days you can drive to the mountain in your 2WD.

 

The bus on a non-powder day would be a super hassle IMO over the car.  On a powder day, it wouldn't bother me at all!

post #24 of 51

I will add that if you do decide to ski Snowbasin, try to hit a clear sky day for your first time.  The views are too good to not be seen & visibility for skiing can suck in the fog if you don't know where you are going.

 

JF


Edited by 4ster - 11/15/13 at 6:38am
post #25 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSchmoe View Post
 

 

With the extra day, don't be afraid to do them both.  Like I said, they make for a great "rest" day as the terrain is really interesting, but just short enough that your legs don't get the same burn as at the bigger resorts.  As has been said many times over, the snow stays better longer there due to less skier traffic than the LCC resorts.

 

My opinion is that if your willing to do some trees do your full day at Brighton and your 2/3 day at Solitude.  

 

If it were me, I'd go:

 

Alta

Snowbasin

Brighton ("rest day")

Snowbird

Solitude.  

 

If snow conditions or canyon restrictions were to dictate otherwise, I'd readjust as necessary.

 

This sounds like a good plan. Playing it by ear with regards to the weather seems like the best call. 

Great advice on the Expedia free day as well. Eases the lift ticket price considerably. 

 

We also decide to go with the rental car, as it's a really competitive rate. (Maybe obvious?) tip to anyone who might ever be looking for rental cars in SLC - if you can avoid avoid the airport, do so! Our rate was nearly $100 lower at the Hertz city location (which is a short tram ride from the airport). We're getting an economy for about $21 a day. 

You can also return it at SLC airport for no extra charge. 

 

I didn't have a chance to respond to some of the other posters, but I really do thank everyone for their input. This community really makes the planning process manageable and helpful, and we're both grateful for everyone's time and assistance. 

 

I think we're gonna be AirBNB'ing a place to stay, leaving the only thing left the skis, which I think we'll do at either Canyon Sports or SkiNSee depending on the rate. 

post #26 of 51

the thing is unless the rental 4wd has snow  tires it can be useless on a big snow day anyways . I will offer this advice though.

 

if there is any chance of a road closure in Little Cottonwood Canyon(LCC), the only sane course of action is to beat the closure somehow and then hope the road stays closed. If the road stays closed you have the cheapest powder skiing ever. I have had snowbird to my self and a couple dozen other people 7 times now, and honestly nothing in the world compares to 3k vertical shot of untrack and unrushed powder. it worth the chance of getting up at 4:30 AM to beat the closure.

post #27 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

the thing is unless the rental 4wd has snow  tires it can be useless on a big snow day anyways . I will offer this advice though.

 

if there is any chance of a road closure in Little Cottonwood Canyon(LCC), the only sane course of action is to beat the closure somehow and then hope the road stays closed. If the road stays closed you have the cheapest powder skiing ever. I have had snowbird to my self and a couple dozen other people 7 times now, and honestly nothing in the world compares to 3k vertical shot of untrack and unrushed powder. it worth the chance of getting up at 4:30 AM to beat the closure.

That sounds incredible. Will definitely keep an eye on the weather. 4:30am is small price to pay for an experience like that. 

I read that January is technically the snowiest month in Utah (according to some historical weather) though I know people swear by February-March/April skiing. 

post #28 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

the thing is unless the rental 4wd has snow  tires it can be useless on a big snow day anyways . I will offer this advice though.

 

if there is any chance of a road closure in Little Cottonwood Canyon(LCC), the only sane course of action is to beat the closure somehow and then hope the road stays closed. If the road stays closed you have the cheapest powder skiing ever. I have had snowbird to my self and a couple dozen other people 7 times now, and honestly nothing in the world compares to 3k vertical shot of untrack and unrushed powder. it worth the chance of getting up at 4:30 AM to beat the closure.

 

Josh, you know the roads better than me for sure, but wouldn't there be a risk of getting caught in an avalanche?  It almost seems if it got you at the right (er... wrong) time, you'd end up down at the bottom of LCC if the snow didn't bury you first.  Isn't that why they close the roads in the first place?

post #29 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSchmoe View Post
 

 

Josh, you know the roads better than me for sure, but wouldn't there be a risk of getting caught in an avalanche?  It almost seems if it got you at the right (er... wrong) time, you'd end up down at the bottom of LCC if the snow didn't bury you first.  Isn't that why they close the roads in the first place?

 

He's talking about planned morning closures so UDOT can do avalanche control on the slide paths above the road.  They typically close around 6:30am, shoot the slides and try to open the road by 8:30am.  If you drive up early and they open the road at 8:30, the crowd will be like most other powder days.  But...  if it keeps snowing, and they can't keep the road safe to open... what he said.

 

They can close the road anytime during the day if they figure it's not safe.  Cars are hardly ever caught in slides.

 

http://trib.com/news/state-and-regional/avalanche-catches-vehicle-in-little-cottonwood-canyon/article_288ad7c0-d214-53e1-b565-891fdd3fe75d.html

post #30 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSchmoe View Post
 

 

Josh, you know the roads better than me for sure, but wouldn't there be a risk of getting caught in an avalanche?  It almost seems if it got you at the right (er... wrong) time, you'd end up down at the bottom of LCC if the snow didn't bury you first.  Isn't that why they close the roads in the first place?

 

 

you are always at rishk of being caught in avalanche, and you could say the risk is greater during a day they are going close the road.

 

They are closing the road to shoot the road with their guns to try cause avalanches, they normally close it early usually about 5:30 am. before that time the avalanche would have to be naturally caused at the exact moment your car was below the chute that was currently sliding. Its a pretty slim chance of actually being taken off the road by a natural avalanche. I always have my beacons before I hit the road driving up LCC......

 

I can only remember on instance of a natural slide causing a unschedule road closure that shut me out of the canyon. I have beat every other road closure schedule on any day I have been looking to ski in LCC. You can not win the lottery unless you play.

 

I use to do this in a FWD hatchback with a Limiedtslip Differential studs and sometimes chains. I have since wised up got a car with 3 Limited slip differentials and 4 burly snow tires, as like the hatchback 5 speed.  this is the reason why I drive from vermont to utah.

 

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