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How to get better as a DC / Mid-Atlantic skier? - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

tongue in cheek post as someone who has spent a ton of time on small hill, this all assuming your fundamentals are good, video could show us if that is true or not.

 

I just want to tell go to Blue Knob make extrovert your proverbially bitch and juptier(which is laughable to even be consider hard terrain) will be the easiest stuff ever.

 

ski bumps, shun others who do not share your desire

 

 

short turn all the time in many different way understand the difference between flex to release and extend to release

 

learn to pivot slip straight down the fall line first on steep terrain , then on the gentlish terrain on the hill

 

learn to hop turn, do it top to bottom on steep pitches at your local hill when you can do it top to bottom on steep pitches start finding easier pitches. I use to do this a couple hours each night at HIdden Valley every year I spent there, I can now basically hop turn down 1000 feet of vertical at time if I need/want to. its my get out of jail free card while sking.

 

learn every stupid human skiing trick in the book.

 

thousands steps, shuffle turns, one footed skiing, outside foot only skiing, inside foot only skiing, white pass turns, and up and over turns

 

learn to ski backwards, learn to do it better than 90 percent of you lame hill can ski forwards, my cousin can literally ski bumps backward

 

do all those stupid human tricks you have learned to do forward now try them backwards, once you can ski bumps one footed backwards I think its  safe to say you have pretty damn good balance. I can personally link turns on on foot backward down green terrain, I have a long way to go before I can do bumps this seems out there but all balance improvement will help your normal skiing

 

go find the small terrain park and learn to at least straight air small to medium tables.

 

learn what transitions are and start to find every single one of them at every hill you ski on. Learn to pop them, absorb them and pump them

 

nobody sane ever gets to be truly spectacular at this sport, ski icey bumps and ski lots of them, learn to do it slowly and in control.

 

 

I like Q recommendation short radius carvers BUT learn to ski on other skis as well. People who only ski on short radius carvers get way to use to the ski making the turn for them and when the going gets tough you want a ski that you turn and not one that turns you.

 

by the way as your Sensie I am taken back by the comment "its feels odd to be doing falling leaf by yourself" do you want to get better or do you want to be normal? they are not one in the same. I would take it one step further and not just do a falling leaf but learn to pivot and switch sides with out changing speed or flow.

 

 

This is all good advice. Josh, fantastic examples of getting the most out of your terrain.  

 

OP, the motivator for improving your balance is that you will be able to go down steeper slopes and manage bumpier or irregular terrain--you'll start enjoying all terrain rather than just the easy stuff.

 

Josh, I love your demo. Are you also able to do it without extending through the transition? 

post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Make a list of the drills Josh mentions.  Read here to figure out what each one is all about, or visit youtube, vimeo, or buy books, or better yet do all of those.  Get out there on easy runs at your local ski area and do the drills with the purpose of mastering each one.  It's "work."  Don't worry how you look.  Which of those other people watching you cares about how you ski?  It's you who cares.   From your first post it's evident you are interested in thinking your way through this.  Thinking about how to get your body to master each drill will lead to better skiing.  Figuring out the difference between flex to release and extend to release will lead you to know more about skiing than most on the hill.  Repetitively doing drills to master "stupid human tricks" is the only way to speed up the learning curve.  Take your joy from each skill development you make, not from adrenaline rushes.  

 

Good advice. Rather than just doing drills for the sake of drills, ask yourself: what is the outcome I'm trying to achieve with the drill? How will achieving this outcome improve my overall skiing? 

post #33 of 46

honestly metaphor I was trying to show independent leg steering being done at the same time in sync with clean edging moves. I was not thinking of extentsion or retraction at all. My guess the extension is my mind playing safe to not catch edges..

post #34 of 46

Oh, it wasn't a criticism, I'm just curious if you're able to. I can't even come close! 

post #35 of 46

I'll make a comment about the falling leaf, nice drillThumbs Up, teaches edge feel, balance fore and aft along with side to side all in one drill (same as 360's maybe a little more refined which is what I was taught 33 years ago on 210's and still practice it today as a warm up for the day of skiing).

 

You learn that, you are already light years ahead of a lot of skiers.  These skills will be part of the main foundation that allow you to ski anything (not pretty, but good enough when required and that's what always counts).  The rest comes a lot quicker when these skill are second nature.

 

As funny as it sounds, certain difficult mile stones must be reached, once they are, the seemingly impossible ones all of a sudden become relatively easy and quickly achieved.

 

BTW I think the extensions are natural as JM seems very relaxed and comfortable (second nature).

post #36 of 46

A flat run out is never a place to just cruise.  It's a place to practice one-footed carving drills (both the hard - inside - and easy - outside - way).  Look for ice, it won't be hard to find, and carve as best you can while making frequent turns.  If there are bumps, ski them.  Etc.  Have this sort of attitude and you'll be fine.  All of the groomer carver and bump stuff transfers 100% to off piste.  They'll both teach balance.  Carving will teach proper body position.  Bumps will teach side slipping, scarving, etc.

post #37 of 46

I'm slightly confused by what people mean by inside/outside one foot carving. Don't you go back and forth between inside and outside as you go between turns? Am I just imagining something completely different than what is being described.

post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post
 

I'm slightly confused by what people mean by inside/outside one foot carving. Don't you go back and forth between inside and outside as you go between turns? Am I just imagining something completely different than what is being described.

 

 

outside foot carving would be right turn left foot switch to left turn right foot

 

inside foot carving would be right turn right foot switch to left foot for your left turn

 

left footed one footed carving is doing both right and left turns on your left foot

 

right footed carving is doing both right and left turns on your right foot.

 

now you want to talk about confusing keep reading.

 

 

white pass turn is this

 

in the fall line start on your left foot while turning right transition from inside edge left foot tt outside edge left foot start turn left on left foot, in the fall line set right foot down pick left up. You are now turning left on your right foot. you will then transition from your inside edge on your right foot to your outside edge on your right foot as you then start turning right. Put your left foot back down in the fall line and start over again.


Edited by Josh Matta - 11/18/13 at 9:16am
post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

 

outside foot carving would be right turn left foot switch to left turn right foot

 

inside foot carving would be right turn right foot switch to left foot for your left turn

 

left footed one footed carving is doing both right and left turns on your left foot

 

right footed carving is doing both right and left turns on your left foot.

 

now you want to talk about confusing keep reading.

 

 

white pass turn is this

 

in the fall line start on your left foot while turning right transition from inside edge left foot tt outside edge left foot start turn left on left foot, in the fall line set right foot down pick left up. You are now turning left on your right foot. you will then transition from your inside edge on your right foot to your outside edge on your right foot as you then start turning right. Put your left foot back down in the fall line and start over again.

Thanks a lot for the explanation. i was imagining the bolded, not what came before it. I'll have to try out the white pass turn on some run outs/small mountain days this year.

post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

 

outside foot carving would be right turn left foot switch to left turn right foot

 

inside foot carving would be right turn right foot switch to left foot for your left turn

 

left footed one footed carving is doing both right and left turns on your left foot

 

right footed carving is doing both right and left turns on your right foot.

 

now you want to talk about confusing keep reading.

 

 

white pass turn is this

 

in the fall line start on your left foot while turning right transition from inside edge left foot tt outside edge left foot start turn left on left foot, in the fall line set right foot down pick left up. You are now turning left on your right foot. you will then transition from your inside edge on your right foot to your outside edge on your right foot as you then start turning right. Put your left foot back down in the fall line and start over again.

 

That's not it.  I thought you were a DCL?

post #41 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
 

 

That's not it.  I thought you were a DCL?

 

 

i am, and I am right on the white pass turn, I am sure your doing it wrong.  if your doing something else its not white pass turn. explain to me what a white pass turn is then?

post #42 of 46

this is up and over, or what i call reverse a pass turn, despite his labeling, I wish they would take it down because its misleading people.

 

 

this is a white pass turn being done fairly well as well. its exactly what how I said to do it.

 

 

this is a correctly labeled Up and over being done my Mikela.

 

 

more white pass turns

 

 

 

there is a clear difference...

post #43 of 46

White pass turns are more difficult than the "up and overs."

"Up and over" is a new label for me.  I've never heard that phrase.

post #44 of 46

How did I beat Rusty to this discussion??  Liberty Mountain has a great adult development series..... junior too if you've got kids.

 

http://www.libertymountainresort.com/learn-to-ski-ride/multi-week-programs/adult-development-programs.aspx

 

 

Most of the instructors for this program are L3 certified( or on the edge of getting it).........many of the customers are repeat because they have so much fun with it.

post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by EasternSkiBum View Post
 

How did I beat Rusty to this discussion??  Liberty Mountain has a great adult development series..... junior too if you've got kids.

 

http://www.libertymountainresort.com/learn-to-ski-ride/multi-week-programs/adult-development-programs.aspx

 

 

Most of the instructors for this program are L3 certified( or on the edge of getting it).........many of the customers are repeat because they have so much fun with it.

 

I may have to make that Liberty program part of my Christmas present for this year.  

post #46 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EasternSkiBum View Post
 

How did I beat Rusty to this discussion??  Liberty Mountain has a great adult development series..... junior too if you've got kids.

 

http://www.libertymountainresort.com/learn-to-ski-ride/multi-week-programs/adult-development-programs.aspx

 

 

Most of the instructors for this program are L3 certified( or on the edge of getting it).........many of the customers are repeat because they have so much fun with it.

 

Thanks for this -- it's exactly what I want and I'm not sure how I missed it.  I'm already booked coaching kids' basketball Saturday (and Sunday) mornings this year but I may try to make it work in 2014/15. 

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