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New Affordable Frontside Ski - Page 4

post #91 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

Can you guys please help cure my hammeritis.  I'm genuinely curious how you end up at a 74mm ski.   You know... everything looks like an 88 to me, so I just don't see what you gain over a more versatile 88ish ski.  

 

I though it might be an east coast thing, but then I remembered seeing this:

 

 

And the OP seems to agree:

 
 

 

One of the great advancements in skis over the last five years is wide skis can now carve exceptionally well.   Why would you not want to take advantage of the versatility that width provides?

 

Please help, I'm confused.

 

First, 88mm skis can carve well.......no doubt about that. Exceptionally well?......that depends upon what you compare it to. Out here in TahoeLand we are known for soft snow and when the buyer says they want a versatile frontside ski we absolutely start the conversations at 85 or so. However, the snow isn't always soft out here and when the skier says they want a real frontside ski.....we dig a little deeper. We'll ask about angles, moving foot pressure, crossunder and stuff like that. If the skier knows what we are talking about, we'll s'plain the differences. If you are a skier with good technical fundamentals and you take out a Kendo or another of the 88s back to back with say a Head Magnum or somesuch you will feel the difference. If you're not that guy then maybe notsomuch.

 

I always have a versatile 88er in my gear corner but I also always own or have access to the 74ish stuff as well. Last year, I skied on the Steadfast and the Head Magnum a lot more than my Bones and after about Jan 20th or so.....mostly the Magnums. This year, it'll probably be a Brahma and a Course Pro. In any case, which way a skier goes depends upon priorities.

 

SJ

 

 

post #92 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

I'm genuinely curious how you end up at a 74mm ski.   You know... everything looks like an 88 to me, so I just don't see what you gain over a more versatile 88ish ski.  

 

 

LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01

post #93 of 107
Thread Starter 

I've got wider skis and ski them when they are in their element.

 

tball: you're from Denver...I ski in southern Vermont almost exclusively.  Our hard snow is different than yours.

 

I am specifically looking for a ski that excels in skiing hard snow groomers and is skiable in hard moguls. Hence, not looking for full-on race skis.  I think the consensus is that a 70-ish carver will carve better than an 88-ish all-mountain.  If the conditions change and I need a different pair of skis, it's a 5-minute walk to my shed at my home mountain.  I'm very fortunate in that regard.

 

I don't need versatility, I need specificity.

post #94 of 107

Hey Joahnsson , you really made it seem like you loved your old fischers, I would bet that you are a fischer guy ( I'm a rossi guy ) go on to their web site and buy the 74 waisted frontside ripper in the high performance category just below their real race skis.I'm sure the folks at fischer are keen on how to make this very versatile type of frontside ski.Let the grandma and grampas slide around on their clumsy 88's while your zooming around on a real pair of frontside skis!!!!!    ( And forget about the money....just click the button and buy them )

post #95 of 107

I appreciate the education and the view into another world.  Thanks folks.  

post #96 of 107
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking9 View Post
 

Hey Joahnsson , you really made it seem like you loved your old fischers, I would bet that you are a fischer guy ( I'm a rossi guy ) go on to their web site and buy the 74 waisted frontside ripper in the high performance category just below their real race skis.I'm sure the folks at fischer are keen on how to make this very versatile type of frontside ski.Let the grandma and grampas slide around on their clumsy 88's while your zooming around on a real pair of frontside skis!!!!!    ( And forget about the money....just click the button and buy them )

Can't forget about the money because I don't have that much of it...I have lots of skis because I buy them used and generally get screaming good deals.  The few new pairs I've bought in the last 15 years are generally "new old stock" and are all less than half of MSRP.

 

And you are correct...of all of the skis I've owned in the last 20 years, Fischers occupy 2 of the top 3 spots in my favorites list.

post #97 of 107

There is a lot of love for Fischer skis in upstate NY.  Two of the guys I ski with don't own any other brand of ski.  Does Austria have lots of glare ice?

 

STE

post #98 of 107
A little late to the game but I'm very happy with my rev 80 pro (2014 models are all pro but just called rev 80). Last year it held well on frozen corduroy, and I just went to my first day on them and they are very well behaved even though I'm a bit rusty, they'll smear, slide, or carve just as happily. There's a bit of rocker, but very minimum.

You are just half inch shorter and 10 lb lighter than me, I'm on 177 and they feel good. Maybe a little soft if you charge hard all the time, but for everyday ski they are good.
post #99 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohansson View Post
 

Can't forget about the money because I don't have that much of it...I have lots of skis because I buy them used and generally get screaming good deals.  The few new pairs I've bought in the last 15 years are generally "new old stock" and are all less than half of MSRP.

 

And you are correct...of all of the skis I've owned in the last 20 years, Fischers occupy 2 of the top 3 spots in my favorites list.

Then pick up a pair of Progressors.  I was on a pair of RX8s, then moved to the Progressor 8+ when the were beat.  The P8+ is an overall better ski than the RX8 - more versatile in the bumps and a bit of fresh and with all the hard snow grip of the RX8.  The Progressor 900 would be on my short list if I was replacing the P8+ today.  I understand the older P10+ is very similar so if you can find a pair of those the price should be good.

post #100 of 107
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the recommendations.  This has been like therapy...I probably knew the answer all along but having people ask questions and point out the obvious got me there.

 

Going to go with Fischer Progressors and I've got a pretty good deal working on a pair...

post #101 of 107
Thread Starter 

Wanted to update everyone that had input into this thread...and get it to 101 posts.

 

I bought Fischer Progressor 950 C-lines in 175cm.  I skied them at Killington yesterday (Saturday).  They were everything I wanted and then some.  It was about 5 degrees with light winds when we grabbed the 5th gondola car at Killington.  It took me about 2 turns to get the feeling of these skis.  They are very responsive but still workable in a variety of terrain.  Random thoughts....the skis have great rebound and really make the cross-under move almost automatic; release the edge and the skis want to jump to the other edge.  It's pretty easy to control turn radius depending on whether you drive the tips (short) or the middle of the ski (long).  I didn't really try the adjustable rebound of the plate...maybe next time.  Unlike racing skis, these skis didn't wear me out; in fact, under the conditions, I think they extended my day because I didn't have to put as much energy into maintaining edge control as I would have had to using wider, less capable skis.

 

I took them in some soft moguls on the Superstar headwall. They worked exactly as I had hoped.  There were some scraped off spots between moguls and the skis let me slice right across them.

 

We took a run down SkyeLark which was mostly (OK, almost completely) scraped off hardpack.  I had no trouble holding an edge and maintaining control while those all around me flailed.  Same experience on East Fall.

 

After about 2 hours, Live4ski begged me to let him try them.  I ski with him a lot and he commented that I was skiing faster and more aggressively than he had seen me ski before.  We adjusted bindings (he has Atomic Blackeye Ti) and took a run down Bittersweet which was getting scraped off.  I really didn't like the dead feeling of the Atomics.  Live4ski wanted to permanently trade  I said no.

 

Many thanks to the folks at StartHaus and in particular, Philpug for getting me exactly what I wanted at a price I could afford.

post #102 of 107

Happy for you! Thanks for the infos and have a great season!

post #103 of 107

Some older skis that I really like:

 

Waveflex 14 from Elan

SLX Waveflex from Elan

Fischer Progressor 900, 950

Head Magnum or Supershape

 

Plenty of others too: I bet you can get a deal on any of the above

post #104 of 107
I couldn't resist and bought the Head TT 80 from Level Nine and skied them this past weekend .Conditions were packed powder here in Pa.believe it or not. I was very pleased with the skis. Sure, there are better more versatile choices but for $ 237 these skis are superb on groomed snow and an excellent value if you want a ski specific to carving turns on groomed snow.

I ' d probably rather have this year's Head Rally or probably for that matter maybe the Rev but I have a pair of Head SS Speeds , sold my Titans and Atomic D2 GS, and like the TT 80 better than these skis. Again I am skiing here at home on man made typically pretty "scratchy" snow so the lack of versatility of the TT 80 in broken snow crud etc. really is not an issue.

I also like the clean cosmetics of the TT 80 . They resemble the Kastle in that manner. I'll get to compare them to my friend's 70 waisted Kastle when we ski together and switch skis. I am very curious to see how they compare.

But in summary if you want a very responsive hard snow ski with an approx 15 meter turn radius and don't want to spend an arm and a leg I think you will be very pleased with the TT 80. It delivers a superb value proposition.

Just my 2 cents.
post #105 of 107

^^^ +1.  

 

TT60's or 80s are superb value carving skis.  There are better slicers on the market, but not anywhere near these prices.  Don't expect to venture off the groomed though, you'll likely regret it.  But if you want cheap carving machines, these are VERY good.

 

Roundturns: PLEASE report back after comparing with the Kastle sticks.  No doubt excellent skis, but worth the extra $1K?

post #106 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post
 

^^^ +1.

 

TT60's or 80s are superb value carving skis.  There are better slicers on the market, but not anywhere near these prices.  Don't expect to venture off the groomed though, you'll likely regret it.  But if you want cheap carving machines, these are VERY good.

 

Roundturns: PLEASE report back after comparing with the Kastle sticks.  No doubt excellent skis, but worth the extra $1K?

TT 80 is an excellent Hard snow ski. My brother got a pair from level nine as well and here in the east, They have become his main stick. good carver and good bump ski for an unbelievable price. TT80 retailed for $800.00+ back in 2011! He has some Head peaks for off trail and powder, but usually stays on his carver. Big favorite with the PMTS folks as well back a couple of years ago.

post #107 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post
 

Some older skis that I really like:

 

Waveflex 14 from Elan

SLX Waveflex from Elan

Fischer Progressor 900, 950

Head Magnum or Supershape

 

Plenty of others too: I bet you can get a deal on any of the above

 I just got the SLX Waveflex in a 170cm and the ski just plain rips on groomers and hard snow. Couldn't be happier with it.

 I like your list. all good east coast rippers.

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