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whats to much ski for east coast?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I just bought a pair of blizzard bonafides. I am now second guessing my decision with a 98 waist im thinking it might be much for the packedp and crud and ice. I normally see. My main ski for groomers are fire arrow 80s. Lemme hear opinions should I return these?
post #2 of 25

where do you ski at?

 

how many days a week do you ski?

 

do you ski woods?

 

do you tour?

 

how strong are your edging skill?

 

How strong are your rotary skills?

 

me.

 

I ski at stowe

 

everyday all year long, first chair on EVERY powder day

 

almost every freerun

 

yep

 

I am one of the stongest skiers on the hill.

 

 

 

I would not think 130+ would be too much ski for me on certain days and on certain run but I find I get 98 percent of the performance in a rockered 110 ski with some lenght, so that what I use.

 

if your skiing on the east coast and it looks like this. I mean this is the east coast.

 

 

get a surfboard.

 

if your skiing at some area that does nt even get 50 inches of natural a year then why would you even be on bonafides? (I would contend that under a strong skier with sharp edges bones work in any snow out there), if you skiing in southern vermont then probably bonafides are all you need or want. If you skiing in canaan valley, Wv, northern vermont, or sugarloaf/saddleback then sure why not bonafides? if you skiing in the snow belt of northern vermont, or storm chasing around new england, a bigger will not be too much ski.

post #3 of 25

If you are mostly skiing ice 98 may be a bit wide, it is in the all mountain ski range, you may have wanted more of a carving ski. The wider ski will be a little more work to get it on its edges. You may just like that ski, time will tell.

post #4 of 25
As a complement to your fire arrows in a two ski east coast quiver, 98 is not too wide, if that is your question. There's more to it than just width, though. If you filter the "me" out of Josh's post, the questions about when, where, and how you ski are relevant.
post #5 of 25

You're keeping the Fire Arrows?  If so, the 98 is fine and will make a great travel ski.  Unless you're in N VT and/or we have a really good year in the East, you'll probably still spend a lot of days on the Fire Arrows.  The real question in this case is not so much the width, but do the Bonafides fit your style of skiing.  I understand they're a hard charging ski - could be completely wrong on this, read reviews - so make sure you're the right type of skier.

post #6 of 25

They will be nicer for when it snows, mixed conditions, and skiing in the woods.  Everyday they will likely be fine to.  Pesonally I like a ski that's a little easier, and a little shorter for those conditions.  But I also want that nice pair of you skis you have for when I feel like going a little faster, and I'd have them slightly longer than 177.  I switch between a 95mm ski and a pair of 183 volkl six stars, and mostly use the 95mm ski.  Only thing I would like to add is the blizzard bonafides, or the volkl mantra, because they would probably be more stable than what I have.  It's frustrating they don't fit in the gondola racks, but I like them for skiing at places like whiteface and gore.  A lot of times a ski like that will make a big difference.  Anytime there's snow, or things are chopped up, for the woods, so why return them?

post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 
Ty all for the replys. I should hace been more clear. For groomers /early morning I wilk be using my firearrow 80s. Then after lunch or on powder days I would be switching to the bona
post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 
Im just fearful. I got go much ski im a on a 174 firearrow. And went to a 187 rocker ski.
post #9 of 25

It will have advantages, and you can always add a 3rd ski to the mix.

post #10 of 25

I would say you might want to think about what you want from a wider ski. The Bone is a pretty strong skki, and for its width, is a bit groomer-centric.  I think you might find the Bones to be a bit like your Firearrows, but wider, and maybe that's what you want for the fresh days.  BUT... I wonder if you want a complementary ski, one that's not so hard charging.  You might have considered a softer ski if you want to venture into the woods, for instance.  Not all 98's are the same.  Others might chime in with suggestions, but the Line Sick Day 95, for instance, is a ski that is wider, but not so burly.

post #11 of 25

Unless you're spending more than 50% of your ski time out of bounds or at least in the trees anything over 90mm underfoot is "too much ski for the east coast".  Lots of people ski fatter anyway, but it is sub optimal.  They look pretty cool anyway though..

post #12 of 25

 

Force, don't worry. Although you made a big jump in length, the rocker will reduce its effective edge so it won't be unmanageable by any means. As far as width, I'd actually almost recommend a 98mm ski as a second to an 80mm carver: makes for a very versatile two ski quiver for the east coast. It's much more about how the ski is built, and I think the Bona Fides will be a blast on everything but the hardest snow days. And even then, it'd be useable.

 

    To put this in perspective, I skied an entire season in PA on 115mm waist Dynastar 6th sense huges, and had a blast. Width isn't that big of a deal once you learn how to manage it.

post #13 of 25

No, 98 underfoot isn't too much ski for the East. I have a pair of 99 underfoot as my daily driver for the East, and they are just fine. I have 78 underfoot carvers for hard days, and I have 117 underfoot for the deep and the soft. 98 is just fine.

post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
Ladies and gents. Thanks so much for the feedback!! Now to look for a pair of bindings to complement my bones
post #15 of 25
It's all about lateral stiffness & I think, you'd be fine!
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

No, 98 underfoot isn't too much ski for the East. I have a pair of 99 underfoot as my daily driver for the East, and they are just fine. I have 78 underfoot carvers for hard days, and I have 117 underfoot for the deep and the soft. 98 is just fine.

 

You also ski at one of the snowiest places in the East and are somewhat more skilled than most people are...    Just sayin'

post #17 of 25

you bought a 187 bonafide? How big are you? 'cause that might not be the optimal size for someone 'questioning' a 98mm ski and currently skiing a 172 frontside ski.

post #18 of 25

If you have a chance,,read in 2014 Buyers Guide ( last page ) a short text on K2 President Tim Petrick .

He offers some pearls of wisdom in regards to ski select. I quote, "Too many people buy their gear from the standpoint of the snow they would like to be skiing on, rather than the reality of where they'll be skiing.

 

Selection of skis is such a "personal" choice,,,,persons should do their personal homework.

 

Too many experts on net.

post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

you bought a 187 bonafide? How big are you? 'cause that might not be the optimal size for someone 'questioning' a 98mm ski and currently skiing a 172 frontside ski.
For sure. And since you will be likely using the 98's in snowier conditions, where you ski in the East is mucho importante' for sizing purposes as things tend to bump up and get mixed real fast....& never mind the glades and trees (if that is in your eastern mix) where you want to be quick....quick....quick....
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
 

you bought a 187 bonafide? How big are you? 'cause that might not be the optimal size for someone 'questioning' a 98mm ski and currently skiing a 172 frontside ski.

A lot of sense in this post.  Within the realm of the "right" length, longer is usually good for charging and hucking.  Doesn't sound like the OP.  If the 174 FAs are right for you, 187 sounds like a big step up even accounting for the rocker.  Are you 135 lbs or 235 lbs?  Are you skiing Camelback or Stowe?  Big differences.

post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Voila View Post

If you have a chance,,read in 2014 Buyers Guide ( last page ) a short text on K2 President Tim Petrick .



He offers some pearls of wisdom in regards to ski select. I quote, "Too many people buy their gear from the standpoint of the snow they would like to be skiing on, rather than the reality of where they'll be skiing.



 



Selection of skis is such a "personal" choice,,,,persons should do their personal homework.



 



Too many experts on net.


 



+1 Good advice here. When I give advice either here or at the shop I work at, I try to determine where they will be doing most of their skiing and suggest skis accordingly. This is also the reasoning that went into me selecting the new RTM 81 for my all mountain mid atlantic ski.

Rick G
post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 

one last question, im 6ft 250 int advanced skier. is a 187 to much ski or should i go with the 180? 

post #23 of 25
187, for sure.
post #24 of 25

Search for the Bonafide sizing threads.......a quick glance was 187 for someone of your size.

post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldsbar View Post

A lot of sense in this post.  Within the realm of the "right" length, longer is usually good for charging and hucking.  Doesn't sound like the OP.  If the 174 FAs are right for you, 187 sounds like a big step up even accounting for the rocker.  Are you 135 lbs or 235 lbs?  Are you skiing Camelback or Stowe?  Big differences.

Love the Camelback reference!
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