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Roto Brushes

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Was looking into roto brushes.  Anyone have any experience with them?  Besides a bit pricey, how do they work?  And brand/brush you can reccomend over another?  Was looking at Toko, Swix, and I think the last one is Red Mountain or (horse)  or something like that.  Was thinking about a horse hair, brass, nylon and the handle.  I have 8 pair that I regularly ski, and wax them either right after I ski or I will ski on them no more than two days then wax.  So this looks like it would save some time and do a great job.  Any reccomendations on where you would get them?  Have looked at Reliable Racing, and Tognar, any others?   Thanks,   Mike

post #2 of 11
I was having a bad hair day myself.
post #3 of 11

http://www.slidewright.com/ski-and-snowboard/waxing/roto-brushes-corks-felts-and-handles/

 

I am totally pleased with my roto brush.  Saves time and works extremely well.  The one thing I mention is that they create a little dust.  Not enough to get you kicked out of your hotel room but enough that a mask would be wise.  I use scotchbrite, brass, horsehair and nylon.

 

Good investment especially for someone with several pair.  Saves a ton of time.

post #4 of 11
post #5 of 11

If you're shorter on time than money, I'd encourage you to get one.  You can probably get by with just a horse hair.  I've recently added a steel for deep base work.  Unless you're a racer, the nylon and horse hair are probably redundant.  If you have more than one brush, you have to decide if you need more than one handle.

post #6 of 11

personally, for a first time purchase, i would say in order of importance - (if you can only buy three, and finish with hand horsehair.) 

 

1 hard nylon

2 soft nylon

3 brass/bronze/copper med to soft

4 horsehair

5 scotchbrite

6 brass/bronze/copper med to stiff

7 steel

8 cork

9 fibrelene

 

nice pricing on the slidewright link btw!

 

but the king of handles is this one

 

quick release shaft and replaceable bearings !!


Edited by Chenzo - 11/8/13 at 4:51pm
post #7 of 11

One of my favorite Christmas presents was my roto set up from RaceWax.  Since I broke both wrists slamming into a tree, anything which cuts down on the strenuous part of tuning I'm in favor of.  Both brushes are horsehair, one soft, one firm.  There is a shield and a handle.  Love the results.

post #8 of 11

  I use the SVST hard, medium, and soft nylon, horsehair, brass, fibertex w/velcro drum, and cork (not necessarily in that order). Then I have a Red Creek fine steel drum and handle (kind of spendy, but worth every penny Thumbs Up). Red Creek makes great brushes in general......

 

  My choices if starting out on rotos would be medium nylon, brass, and horsehair-- I will say that I still use hand brushes a fair amount though...

 

   zenny

post #9 of 11
Yeah, I alternate passes with the rotobrushes with a series of hand brushes.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by RenoSkiGuy View Post
 

Was looking into roto brushes.  Anyone have any experience with them?  Besides a bit pricey, how do they work?  And brand/brush you can reccomend over another?  Was looking at Toko, Swix, and I think the last one is Red Mountain or (horse)  or something like that.  Was thinking about a horse hair, brass, nylon and the handle.  I have 8 pair that I regularly ski, and wax them either right after I ski or I will ski on them no more than two days then wax.  So this looks like it would save some time and do a great job.  Any reccomendations on where you would get them?  Have looked at Reliable Racing, and Tognar, any others?   Thanks,   Mike


I love my roto brushes.  I love my oval hand brushes.  I really like my rectangular brush.  I get done with a roto brush in (guessing) 1/4 the time using a hand brush.  Some times I just like using the hand brushes but when you have many skis to do, it gets tiring and takes a while.

 

There are plenty of threads here on how to use them correctly and it is important.  Also is making sure you have a good drill.  I had been using an old Ryobi cordless.  I didn't notice the performance was degrading on the drill until about two weeks ago it started slipping.  Since I'm spoiled, I went and bought a new one.  WOW! Big difference.  I had actually been using my oval hand brushes more because the rotos weren't that impressive anymore. 

 

I've been prepping skis for the season.  Lots of hot cycling wax, scraping and brushing.  I've gotten my skis show room ready using the roto stiff horse hair and soft nylon.  Even with the "cold" wax I put on my race skis.  I really try to not put metal on the base.  I have used the brass but my choice this year is to wax more frequently so I don't need to use the brass one.  Having a sharp scraper helps too.  I just paid lots of money for stone grind work and I want to make it last.

 

A lot of people (I used to too) put the drill in reverse, start at the tip and work their way to the tail.  Picture yourself standing at the tip of the ski, facing the tail and the ski is on your left.  With the drill in your right hand and roto brush handle in your left, if the drill is in reverse, you're brushing in the same direction as using hand brushes and going tip to tail.

 

Now stand at the tail of the ski facing the tip.  Put the drill in your right hand and roto brush handle in your left.  If the drill is in the FORWARD rotating position, if you start at the tail and work towards the tip, you are again brushing tip to tail BUT, you have the added bonus of faster rpm because you are in forward AND you aren't brushing over the wax dust that was just removed by brushing.  The wax dust goes towards the tail you you go towards the tip.

 

WEAR SAFETY GLASSES.  The wax dust is coming at you.

 

When it comes to purchasing them, there are some models that don't work with others.  There is a list on this site somewhere but I think there are two basic styles; hex and oval shafts.  I have hex and have Maplus, Toko and I think Swix roto brushes.  My advice it to shop around and buy what and from whom is having the best sale.  Thanksgiving time there are usually some good ones.  I've had great success and help from Alpinord (SlideWright) and Dr D (Racewax.com) and they frequent here too.  Top notch customer service.

 

You'll be happy you got them.

 

Have fun,

 

Ken

post #11 of 11
Get one horse hair rotobrush per season. If you use high floro waxes, get another one for those. I Have the swix handle from racewax and it's great.

Add one oval brass brush for cleaning before waxing

And it is also good to have one soft steel brush before the brass. Sometimes a stiff nylon oval brush comes in handy, to remove bulk left by the horse hair.

Spend the rest on beer, skis and diamond stones!

Cheers
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