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Alpina 2014 R4 Rear Entry Ski Boots

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Could you see yourself in these under some circumstance?

 

Hold on, just a sec...

 

 

OK, lemme have it.

post #2 of 19

NO.

 

SJ

post #3 of 19

:'D

post #4 of 19

Donno...They seem to have a market in rental. Other than that, I did see a person wearing a pair of rear entry boots last weekend.

post #5 of 19

Hell, no!   But a lot of similar boots were sold in the 80s, and there are a lot of casual skiers who still swear by them, because they found them to be very convenient.  My guess is that Alpina will sell a lot of them, because they probably are the only ones offering such boots at the present time, and there is a market niche for them, even though it is likely an inferior product from a performance standpoint.  For many people, convenience trumps performance!

post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 

I looked yesterday and couldn't find the R4 anywhere on the Alpina web site. Thought maybe they were ashamed to be offering rear entry, but looked again today and they're up there now.

 

In any event Alpina may be the only ones offering new new stock, but there's apparently some new old stock floating around...

 

NEW HEAD RR8 REAR ENTRY SKIBOOT   ( on EBay as well )

 

 

Although recent reports indicate that seller can be a little, er, challenging - caveat emptor.


Edited by jc-ski - 11/8/13 at 9:58am
post #7 of 19

Oh dear. 

I'd rather wear  Kneissl's old soft boot.     That's if, like, you put a gun to my head and forced me to choose between the two or something. 

post #8 of 19

The fact is there is a real need for a decent rear entry boot. If not rear entry, then something else that is easy to get into. I know of people who are either older,  75+, or who have ankle issues or both that have a terrible time getting into a ski boot. They are not hardcore rippers, never were, but like to ski and would ski more if not for the incredible hassle of getting boots on and off. Makes it not worth it for them to go out for 3 hours.

 

Has the industry has totally given up on easy to get into boots? People dropping cliffs or skiing at 60mph have little to do with 90%, (I should use 97 for historical purposes, but that's pushing it), of the skiiing public.

Instead of making 10 different versions of basically the same thing, with idiotic "new" gizmos having yet another acronym, why not make something different?

Sorry, but the ski industry is just retarded idiotic. Then "it" complains as people leave.

 

Don't shops want a boot that's easy to get into yet offers decent performance?

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

The fact is there is a real need for a decent rear entry boot. If not rear entry, then something else that is easy to get into. I know of people who are either older,  75+, or who have ankle issues or both that have a terrible time getting into a ski boot. They are not hardcore rippers, never were, but like to ski and would ski more if not for the incredible hassle of getting boots on and off. Makes it not worth it for them to go out for 3 hours.

 

Has the industry has totally given up on easy to get into boots? People dropping cliffs or skiing at 60mph have little to do with 90%, (I should use 97 for historical purposes, but that's pushing it), of the skiiing public.

Instead of making 10 different versions of basically the same thing, with idiotic "new" gizmos having yet another acronym, why not make something different?

Sorry, but the ski industry is just retarded idiotic. Then "it" complains as people leave.

 

Don't shops want a boot that's easy to get into yet offers decent performance?

I agree. My mother is in a pair of Rossi's old Soft boots, and they have kept her skiing into her 70s whereas she was ready to quit due to the boots. 

 

Just having had a second foot operation, I myself am a little more sensitive to the difficulties of getting in and out right now. Luckily all is well, I think, but all summer I was wondering if moving from overlap to 3-piece would be necessary. 

 

There is that Apex thing, of course... 

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

I agree. My mother is in a pair of Rossi's old Soft boots, and they have kept her skiing into her 70s whereas she was ready to quit due to the boots. 

 

Just having had a second foot operation, I myself am a little more sensitive to the difficulties of getting in and out right now. Luckily all is well, I think, but all summer I was wondering if moving from overlap to 3-piece would be necessary. 

 

There is that Apex thing, of course... 

 

That happened to me once with a pretty mangled foot due a gnarly wreck @ Mt Hood one summer. I chose to ski in a really soft conventional boot the following winter (Lange XR 75 IIRC) and did just fine. Truth be told, it was probably good for my skiing since I couldn't hammer the front of the boot very hard. I'm sure that is the source of my dainty touch on skis these days............:o

 

SJ

post #11 of 19

A couple of years back I had to travel to Nizhny Novgorod Russia on business for three weeks in February. I found out there was a ski resort (?) about 40 km from there. A colleague took me out there to ski with her. I rented some worn out rear entry boots and some old Elans with edges that were dull. Did I care? Hell No! I was skiing in Russia and would never get another opportunity. Not many could say the same. Would I do it again? You bet, rear entry boots and all!!

 

Karl

post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

 

Truth be told, it was probably good for my skiing since I couldn't hammer the front of the boot very hard. I'm sure that is the source of my dainty touch on skis these days............:o

 

In addition to possibly being a good alternative for certain older or injured/recovering skiers I wonder if the Alpina's might serve a useful purpose for the higher skilled, along the same line described above. If you were to ski well in them I'm guessing you'd have to develop a pretty good ability to stay centered without depending on the boot to help you so much with that, fore-aft anyway. With a flex rating of 40 the Alpina's are pretty soft, but I wonder how laterally stiff they are? Stiff enough that they could be an interesting drill boot?

 

I also wonder if they might be a serviceable boot for mellow alpine touring, say with fish-scaled skis and Fritschi's?

 

For those who might know, I'm curious: What kind of rating would a leather ski boot from the 60's get on today's flex scale?


Edited by jc-ski - 11/8/13 at 7:06pm
post #13 of 19

Maybe Jim will answer the flex thing. The "scale" is not very scientific, that's for sure. Leather boots were very low, so even if they were somehow made 130 flex, they'd feel like junior boots except when your leg snapped at the top in a bad fall.

 

Let's face it, these Alpina's look like total turds, so probably no to the other questions.

post #14 of 19

Rental market,

 

works real well with beginning skiers with large calves,

 

Helped out at a resort one winter and I began to appreciate why these were in stock in the rental department.

 

I never tried em though, my boots fit great 

post #15 of 19

The best rear entry ski boots were made by Salomon in the 80's.  Originally, Salomon was known for bindings.  Then they introduced the SX-90 and the higher performance SX-91 Equipe and similar models.  The ski racers never bought into the rear-entry, and Salomon dropped the line after a very successful run.  Everyone I know who had them, skied on them as long as they could, typically 15 years or so.  They were the best boots I have ever skied on before or since.  I now have Salomon top entry (4-buckle) boots and they are not nearly as comfortable nor as full control as my SX-91 Equipes were.  For that reason, I just started a petition on Change.org and hope that everyone will sign the petition.  There is a huge market for rear entry ski boots.  This model by Alpina is a start, but we need some higher performance rear entry boots.  Once you get a good fit in a rear entry, you will never want a top entry (3 or 4 buckle) boot ever again.  One of the best features of the SX-90 etc was the hold down system.  A plastic shaped plate fit between the shell and the inner boot.  This plate was shaped to fit your instep, just below the ankle.  A cable behind the plate pulled your instep at a perfect angle right into the heal of the boot (at a 45 degree angle from your leg).  This cable tightened by pressing a single lever on the outside back of the boot.  The cable was infinitely adjustable.  You could tighten up a tad for a run through some steep moguls or loosen up for a cruised through powder.  You could take all the pressure off while you rode on the ski lift just by flicking the lever.  For people with bad circulation or people skiing in especially cold areas, this meant a lot more blood got to your toes and your feet stayed warm.  The boots took 1/4 the time and 1/10 the effort of putting on and taking off of other boots.   There were models for all levels of skiers, from beginners to advanced.

 

Here is a link to the petition.  Please consider signing: 

https://www.change.org/p/salomon-heikki-takala-president-and-ceo-of-amer-sports-salomon-bring-back-rear-entry-ski-boots?recruiter=105419565&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink

post #16 of 19

:ROTF 

 

Oh, and welcome to Epic. 

post #17 of 19

Well I am one who skied on my 90 equipes till they broke. Spent money and time on 4 clip boots but they hurt a lot any time I had them tight enough to give me control and was ready to quit skiing when I found a pr of used 92 equipes. 

 

I have happy feet again. Comfort and Control.

 

As I am aware that I am on borrowed time with the 92s I will certainly look to try on a pair of these Alpinas when I visit SLC next year. 

 

BTW If anyone has a spare cover for the rear lever I would love to buy it off you.

 

post #18 of 19
There's at least one person on here who has a pair of Solly rear entries waiting in a dark closet for when the current pair wears out.
post #19 of 19
I used to have a pair of slime green rear entry Hanson's in the late 70s, which I loved at the time.

Today I hzve a pair of Dalbello alpine boots and a pair of Scarpa AT boots.

Both are based on a "cabrio" design which features a hinged tongue.

Super easy to get on and off but with buckles over the foot for really great heel retention.
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