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No Matter What The Disablity You Can Ski! Adaptive Skiing and Boarding Thread

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

As ski season approaches and has already started in some areas I thought it a good idea to remind everyone about all the wonderful adaptive skiing programs all over the world.

I work with OAS (Oregon Adaptive Sports).  They have programs at Mt. Bachelor and Hoodoo Mt. Resort in Central Oregon. 

 

I will start by posting a short video and leave their contact information.  Then I hope others will do a similar thing for an adaptive program that they know about anywhere.

 

The idea is to bring a bunch of info to the thread for potential new adaptive skiers and boarders, and to bring more awareness to the rest of us who may wish to become involved in an adaptive program near them.

 

You don't need to work with a program to post.  Sure one can poke around the web and find them, but this might be a nice thing for folks to do for an adaptive program near them and maybe get more people to think about being a volunteer with a program near them as well

 

 

Website:  http://oregonadaptivesports.org/

.Office phone: 541-306-4774
Operations cell phone: 541-848-9390

post #2 of 14

Good deal Jacques!

 

I'm a sitskier, a C7 paraplegic, and have skied at a few programs: Breckenridge, Alpine Meadows, Jackson Hole, and Perfect North (Indiana).  I'm not independent on the snow, so always have to ski in an adaptive program.  There are a few forums that address this adaptive sport, my favorite is:

 

http://www.adaptivesportsforums.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?5-Winter-Sports&

 

I have heard from friends of *very* good programs at several ski areas: (EAST) Loon Mountain, Sunday River, Wintergreen (VA), Snowshoe (WV), (WEST) Northstar, Crested Butte, Park City, Winter Park, Mammoth, and Big Bear (SoCal).  Some of these outfits, like yours, such as Northstar and Loon Mountain, travel to various areas to serve the needs of local skiers.  Nearly all big areas now have adaptive programs, a great improvement from years past.  Below are links to the ones I skied with and some others.  Thank you Jacques for posting this, and thank you for your work!

 

This is a *small sampling* of the programs out there...search "adaptive ski" at any given area or region, or call the ski schools at the area you are looking at.  Nothing in Canada is listed here because of prejudice.

 

Just kidding.  Canadian programs are awesome and plentiful.

 

WEST:

 

Breckenridge (excellent and the biggest for paraplegic/quadriplegic skiers):

http://dev.boec.org/adaptive-ski-ride-school/

 

Park City (supposed to be huge):

http://www.discovernac.org/

 

Jackson Hole (small program but *awesome* instructors):

http://www.jacksonhole.com/adaptive.html

 

Snowbird (+Alta?):

http://wasatchadaptivesports.org/

 

Crested Butte:

http://www.adaptivesports.org/

 

Tahoe areas (the great Bill Boness teaches at Northstar):

http://www.dsusafw.org/winter.shtml

 

Southern California (Big Bear has an awesome program):

http://usarc.org/

 

EAST and MIDWEST:

 

Perfect North (Southern Indiana):

http://www.perfectnorth.com/daily_lessons.php

 

Wintergreen (closest to Washington DC):

http://wintergreenadaptivesports.org/

 

Snowshoe:

http://www.snowshoemtn.com/en/plan-your-trip/ski-and-snowboard-school/adaptive-sports-program.aspx

 

Loon Mountain (REALLY impressed with this outfit):

http://www.nedisabledsports.org/default.aspx

post #3 of 14

I have heard very good things about Adaptive Sports Association that operates out of Durango Mountain Resort.  I've considered volunteering with their autism program but have a lot on my plate at the moment.

 

http://www.asadurango.com/winter/overview.html

post #4 of 14

Just want to add a heads up to any Canadian Epic ski members to check out the CADS (Canadian Association for Disabled Skiers) program in your area. http://disabledskiing.ca/

My wife and I volunteer for the CADS Alberta program at Castle Mountain and it is one of the most rewarding experiences I have ever had skiing. To see the enjoyment and sense of accomplishment in the eyes of the people we work with is amazing and constantly recharges our own excitement for the sport we love.

Volunteer - you won't regret it. 

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

^ Very nice people!  Hope we can get some more.

post #6 of 14
Cool thread. I'm always impressed/inspired when I see the adaptive skiing folks out there having a blast.
That something I'd like to work with, if I can become a good enough skier.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post

Cool thread. I'm always impressed/inspired when I see the adaptive skiing folks out there having a blast.
That something I'd like to work with, if I can become a good enough skier.


Depending on your function you don't need to be an expert skier to help out.  There are many ways one can help.

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 


Depending on your function you don't need to be an expert skier to help out.  There are many ways one can help.

 

Just to add to what Jacques said you only need to be an intermediate skier. We have volunteers who help load, who act as uphill traffic control, who work with blind skiers and other functions that don'r require outstanding skill but just need a positive, patient attitude. With the exception of some of our paraskiers we are on easy beginner/intermediate slopes.  

post #9 of 14

The National Sports Center for the Disabled (NSCD) out of Winter Park (www.nscd.org) is one of the largest and oldest "therapeutic recreation agencies" in the world. It operates year round. It is not limited to skiing. The winter skiing and riding program at Winter Park used over 800 volunteers when I was there last; I don't know if the number has changed significantly since then. Very few of the volunteers are expert skiers, and very few of the clients require expert skiers to assist/teach them. Certain assignments require very strong skers, as might be expected. Most do not.

 

Quote:

We have volunteers who help load, who act as uphill traffic control, who work with blind skiers and other functions that don'r require outstanding skill but just need a positive, patient attitude.

 

I have guided visually impaired skiers who were fast, strong skiers and required a solid skill set in their guides. If you volunteer for a program, you won't ski with someone like that until you have adequate skill and training.

 

If you're interested, by all means find a program in your region and volunteer. It will require commitment on your part. Percs include training, personal ski instruction and excellent support, assuming it's a good program.

post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 

^ More great information!  Thanks to all.  BTW, OAS (Oregon Adaptive Sports) also has year around programs!  Central Oregon is an awesome place in the off ski season.

post #11 of 14

Cool thread! I always love seeing these guys and gals out on the hill.

 

I've heard about the program in Park City mentioned above, and since I don't know of any others, I'll try to add to the thread with a couple of relevant equipment projects I've run into this year. 

 

This one is an adaptive "sit snowboard" that I saw at ISPO Munich in February: http://www.prodaptive.nl/wordpress/?page_id=2

 

There are other adaptive snowboard designs, but I've never actually seen these guys on the mountain, though I see sit skiers fairly regularly. 

 

This one is a Kickstarter project for a snowboard kneeler conversion. It wasn't specifically designed as an adaptive device, but they've talked with some adaptive groups in Colorado and are exploring its potential for certain groups: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/kneeflyer/the-kneeflyer-a-binding-system-for-kneeboarding

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post
 

Cool thread! I always love seeing these guys and gals out on the hill.

 

I've heard about the program in Park City mentioned above, and since I don't know of any others, I'll try to add to the thread with a couple of relevant equipment projects I've run into this year. 

 

This one is an adaptive "sit snowboard" that I saw at ISPO Munich in February: http://www.prodaptive.nl/wordpress/?page_id=2

 

There are other adaptive snowboard designs, but I've never actually seen these guys on the mountain, though I see sit skiers fairly regularly. 

 

This one is a Kickstarter project for a snowboard kneeler conversion. It wasn't specifically designed as an adaptive device, but they've talked with some adaptive groups in Colorado and are exploring its potential for certain groups: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/kneeflyer/the-kneeflyer-a-binding-system-for-kneeboarding


Nice info.  The second link is a bit spammy though, as it is a fund raising site.  That being said, I guess it could possibly fit into adaptive sports in some way.  Thanks!

post #13 of 14
Spammy? It's got nothing to with me, just happened to find it b/c I follow ski/outdoor gear. You can look at my post totals and see I'm not a one-timer scouring Google for forum posts to spam. Just an FYI on some things going on in the segment. Not every link to a product or project is spam.
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post

Spammy? It's got nothing to with me, just happened to find it b/c I follow ski/outdoor gear. You can look at my post totals and see I'm not a one-timer scouring Google for forum posts to spam. Just an FYI on some things going on in the segment. Not every link to a product or project is spam.


Oh no!  Don't get me wrong.  I think it's great you put it out there.  I am not saying you are a spammer at all!  I did finish with a thank you.  Sorry if it came across the wrong way.  As a matter of fact some folks need venture capital, so it's all good!   Hope this squares it away for anyone else here too!  

 

People, please post whatever you can as long as it is about adaptive skiing programs or gear.  Epic Ski has a high search ranking it seems to me, so threads here are a fantastic resource for all searchers.   Thanks again JoeUT !

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